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School Choice

NEWS
December 26, 1991 | By Wendy Greenberg, Special to The Inquirer
Although the school choice bill seems like a ghost of Christmas past, area educators warn that it's too soon for a eulogy. "I don't think there is any question it will come up again," said Colonial School Superintendent Stanley Durtan. "The question is, in what form?" The bill that passed in the state Senate and failed in a different form in the House earlier this month would have given parents vouchers of $900 to be used for school tuition. Proponents said the boost to private and parochial schools would have bettered public schools through competition; opponents said the voucher system could dismantle public education, especially in cities.
NEWS
May 25, 2007 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State Rep. Dwight Evans called the Philadelphia School District's top official yesterday with a stern warning: Don't eliminate or severely reduce funding for private groups managing 41 public schools, or else face a loss of state funding. The state has earmarked $25 million in annual funding for outside groups that manage city schools, $18 million of which has gone to the six groups called Educational Management Organizations (EMOs). Evans and several other legislators had indicated in recent months that funding could be in jeopardy if the district fired the groups, but Evans decided Philadelphia School Reform Commission Chairman James Nevels needed to hear the message again and directly.
NEWS
January 12, 2012 | By Phil Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
ROBBINSVILLE, N.J. - Students who transfer under the school-choice program will not have to sit out 30 days to participate in varsity sports, the NJSIAA says. The decision, announced Wednesday, was a reversal of a rule the state association instituted in November, when it said that school-choice transfers would be held to the same standards as other transfers - requiring varsity athletes who do not change residence to sit out 30 days before playing for their new school. But NJSIAA officials said the state Department of Education doesn't want any impediments on students who transfer under the school-choice program.
SPORTS
January 13, 2012 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
ROBBINSVILLE, N.J. - Students who transfer under the school-choice program will not have to sit out 30 days to participate in varsity sports, the NJSIAA says. The decision, announced Wednesday, was a reversal of a rule the state association instituted in November, when it said that school-choice transfers would be held to the same standards as other transfers - requiring varsity athletes who do not change residence to sit out 30 days before playing for their new school. But NJSIAA officials said the state Department of Education doesn't want any impediments on students who transfer under the school-choice program.
SPORTS
September 18, 2011 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
It took one game for the new school-choice program to make an impact on Colonial Conference football. One game. What happens in a month? A season? A couple of years of "recruiting" - oops, I meant to say "attracting" - student-athletes to schools outside their home district? The summer buzz in the Colonial Conference was about Sterling, since the Silver Knights had "attracted" several student-athletes from other districts through its school-choice option, which is linked to its Junior Naval ROTC program.
NEWS
March 17, 2000 | By David Boldt
This column could be hazardous to the health of Ellen Brennan, and she should stop reading right now. She wrote after Tuesday's column to say she was sick and tired of my columns promoting school choice, and that if I wrote one more she was "going to have a heart attack. " Ms. Brennan, I fear, may speak for many, and so let me try to explain my compulsion on this issue. It is simply this: Here we have this strategy that shows more promise than any other for improving the education of low-income urban students, yet it's caught in a peculiar political logjam.
NEWS
December 9, 1991 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
The answer to any question about the doings in Harrisburg is almost always the same - raw politics. And that is why "school choice" faces a state House vote, possibly as soon as tomorrow. A plan for the state to give $900 vouchers to parents wishing to send their kids to a different school is on a fast track. It's not a new plan. Even if enacted it likely won't give anyone money for years because it's certain to be tied up in the courts. But it exploded onto the political scene.
NEWS
June 14, 1995 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The $16.2 billion general-fund budget negotiated privately by Gov. Ridge and legislative leaders and released for the first time yesterday contains money for school choice, but there are still no guarantees that the controversial plan will pass the General Assembly. House Republican leaders said lawmakers would vote on the budget today and would possibly take up the separate empowering legislation to enable low- income families to send children to private, public or parochial schools of their choice.
NEWS
November 15, 1996
Legislation to set up charter schools in Pennsylvania is struggling in the state Senate, caught in a political and philosophical debate over, essentially, how much freedom these alternative public schools should have. Some senators are so anxious to pass something that they seem willing to gloss over the hard questions. That's a mistake. While it's important to get the state moving on charter schools, it's better to do it right. Charter schools are a modest form of school choice.
NEWS
July 31, 1998 | by Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
Sam Katz, the brainy finance expert and onetime political maverick who is endorsed for mayor by Republican leaders, intends to make school choice a major campaign issue. "Giving parents the right to choose which school their children will go to is something I've advocated since 1991," said Katz, a member of the Board of Education from 1981-85. Despite a history of friction with the party's hierarchy, Katz received the nod of the leaders two days ago because he was viewed as the candidate most likely to defeat the Democrats, said state House Majority Leader John M. Perzel.
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