CollectionsSchool Choice
IN THE NEWS

School Choice

NEWS
October 6, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Six of 27 school districts that sought state funding to receive students from other communities learned this week that their applications for a so-called choice designation had been rejected by the New Jersey Department of Education. They "were not approved because their applications didn't sufficiently address the questions in the application forms," department spokesman Michael Yaple said. "We didn't have enough information or the applications weren't complete. " Yaple said some responses to questions contradicted state law for admissions and lottery processes.
NEWS
October 2, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
ABOUT 20 PROTESTERS chanted outside a North Philadelphia charter school yesterday afternoon, claiming a group of visiting philanthropists were "deciding what education looks like in America, not the parents, not the students. " The activists from Fight for Philly and the Philadelphia Coalition Advocating for Public Schools protested outside Grover Cleveland Mastery Charter School on 19th Street near Erie Avenue, where attendees of a conference, "All of the Above: How Donors Can Expand a City's Great Schools," were taking a tour.
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was AP English, not government, but House Majority Leader Eric Cantor was familiar with the topic of instruction Monday morning in the writing center at Freire Charter School. "We're studying point of view," a student told the congressional visitor, and Cantor chuckled. Through the window of the third-floor classroom, Cantor and the students could hear about a dozen protesters outside chanting, "Hey, hey, ho, ho, Eric Cantor's got to go. " "You look out the window," Cantor told the class.
SPORTS
September 5, 2013 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Kahleil Chisolm carries the football, he breaks tackles and new ground. The Audubon High senior didn't set out to be a trail blazer, to establish a precedent in South Jersey sports, to become one of the first athletes to take advantage of a seismic change in the state's educational system. But it's kind of worked out that way. "I bleed green now," Chisolm said with a smile the other day after a scrimmage against Highland. The 5-foot-9, 175-pound Chisolm is one of the toughest running backs in South Jersey.
NEWS
June 27, 2013 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie accepted a citizen of the year award in Philadelphia on Tuesday from a group that funds scholarships for poor children to go to private schools - but his appearance came with a touch of irony. Christie had just reached a budget deal with the Democratic-controlled legislature that eliminated a $2 million school-choice pilot program. It was one of the few concessions he made in the $33 billion budget, and it continued 31/2 years of his failing in attempts to bring school choice to New Jersey.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two Camden charter schools and a third in Atlantic County have been added to the list of schools put on probation by the state Department of Education. The D.U.E. Season Charter School and Environment Community Opportunity (ECO) Charter School, both in Camden, and the Galloway Community Charter School have been put on probation after recent enhanced performance reviews found they were "not providing high-quality education" and warranted "immediate action," according to letters to the schools from Evo Popoff, the department's chief innovation officer.
NEWS
May 10, 2013
By Robert Maranto The best book about public schools is not about schools at all. Jeffrey Race's War Comes to Long An tells the tale of a province viewed in completely different ways by the North and South in the long Vietnamese civil war. The communists and government forces had different names for the same towns, had safe havens and danger zones that were mirror images of each other, and had completely distinct views of what the war was...
NEWS
March 18, 2013 | Matt Katz, Inquirer Staff Writer
Meeting with African American leaders at the governor's mansion last year, Gov. Christie told a story from his student days at the University of Delaware. An African American friend, hoping to give the young Christie a sense of being black on a largely white campus, took the future governor to the historically black Delaware State University. Christie stood out. He got stares. And so, the boy from the white North Jersey suburbs got a small sense of his friend's daily existence. Michael Blunt, the African American mayor of tiny Chesilhurst borough in Camden County, recalls being moved when hearing the story.
NEWS
March 11, 2013
THE DEED is done. Amid some of the most well-orchestrated and well-attended protests from parents and activists in recent history, the School Reform Commission last week voted to close down nearly two-dozen schools and consolidate a dozen others. The next question: What can the SRC and Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. do to prevent more closings in the future? More to the point, what can parents, teachers and public-education advocates do to prevent them? Before we get to answers, we have to look at the problem.
NEWS
January 31, 2013
By Michael Moroney It is no secret that our education system needs reform, but what direction to take and how to get there present a formidable challenge. Countless studies have shown that our children's math and science skills are dangerously below average. Test scores for eighth-grade Pennsylvania students have remained stagnant since 2005, and in 2011, about 61 percent of students scored basic or below basic on standardized tests. Schools continuously report failing test scores while our federal government pours unprecedented amounts of taxpayer money into an ineffective system.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|