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NEWS
April 20, 1995 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A committee has been convened to review two novels that parents in the West Chester School District have complained contain sexually charged and foul language. A nine-member committee will evaluate The Bluest Eye, by Pulitzer Prize- winner Toni Morrison, and In Country, by Bobbie Ann Mason. In February, a similar committee, made up of faculty, administration, parents and students, recommended that the novel Lucy by Jamaica Kincaid be taken off the required-reading list for high school seniors and placed on the optional list - meaning that teachers may choose to use the book if they want to, but that it cannot be a part of mid-term or final exams.
NEWS
February 11, 1999 | By Lewis Kamb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Responding to allegations of irregular billing by a firm the school district hired last year, a special committee of the Morrisville school board said last night it had found no evidence of "illegal activity" or "malice. " But the committee said that the company was "opportunist" and that the business practices of the district "have been sloppy. " The committee recommended that the board review the way it handles work contracts and how it tracks work being done, and that the board consider hiring an independent certified public accountant to audit the district's finances.
NEWS
January 18, 2011 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Plymouth Meeting Friends School, a small elementary school, has chosen a veteran Quaker educator as its next head. The school committee Monday announced that Deborah Kost will succeed Anne Javsicas on July 1. Javsicas is retiring after 22 years as head of school. Kost, who spent 12 years as a teacher and administrator at Friends Select School in Center City, is a former head of Haddonfield Friends School. She now heads the Janus School, a private K-12 school for students with learning differences in Mount Joy, Lancaster County.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An administrator of a private school in Brooklyn, N.Y., with a background in science and philosophy will become the next head of Germantown Friends School and the first female to lead the school in more than 140 years. Dana J. Okeson, 48, will assume the post at the Quaker school July 15. The last time Germantown Friends had a woman in charge was in 1869. Okeson, who grew up in Overbrook and is a graduate of Merion Mercy Academy, will succeed Richard L. Wade, who announced a year ago he would retire in June 2013 after leading GFS for 20 years.
NEWS
November 10, 2012 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
An administrator of a private school in Brooklyn, N.Y., with a background in science and philosophy will become the next head of Germantown Friends School and the first female to lead the school in more than 140 years. Dana J. Okeson, 48, will assume the post at the Quaker school July 15. The last time Germantown Friends had a woman in charge was in 1869. Okeson, who grew up in Overbrook and is a graduate of Merion Mercy Academy, will succeed Richard L. Wade, who announced a year ago he would retire in June 2013 after leading GFS for 20 years.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writer
John B. "Jack" Hagner, 83, of Bala Cynwyd, a longtime public accountant, died Monday, Oct. 20, of dementia at Symphony Square Assisted Living & Memory Care. His wife of 27 years, Mary Ellen Yuhas Hagner, said Mr. Hagner started suffering memory loss in 2011 and was diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia. In 2013, he was admitted to Symphony Square. Mr. Hagner worked as a public accountant for 41 years at Ratke, Miller, Hagner & Co. in Philadelphia. It was formerly known as Hagner & Co. after his grandfather and father, who founded the company during the 1930s.
NEWS
July 9, 1997 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Public school students here won't have to pack up their jeans, T-shirts, and sneakers - their self-imposed dress code - when classes resume in September. A school committee has shelved plans to require students to wear uniform dress styles - for now, anyway. After a year of study and debate, two community surveys, and two public hearings in the last two months, the Dress Code Committee discovered a nightmare in the closet when the issue was raised. "People were actually yelling at the meetings," said Bonita Marchetti-Rocco, the committee chairwoman.
NEWS
November 24, 1992 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The ad hoc school committee, after studying ways to relieve overcrowding in the district, has recommended the construction of a middle school. The proposal was released last night by the school board. The building, which would be the district's third school, should cost no more than $6 million to build, the committee report said. Last year, voters rejected a bond issue that would have provided for a $9.5 million school. The building would have 15 classrooms, a multipurpose room, a media center, two science labs and other non-instructional areas.
NEWS
November 1, 1992 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Southampton's ad hoc school committee, studying alternatives to relieve overcrowding in the district, will hand in its report Nov. 9, but the public won't be able to see it until the middle of the month. Michael Black, the panel's chairman, said the report was in its "final draft stage" but would not say what recommendations his committee had made. Black told the school board at its Oct. 26 meeting that the report will be given to the school board's Long Range Planning and Facilities Committee on Nov. 9. After board members have had a chance to look at it, the report will be released to the public on or about Nov. 16. The school board formed the committee in April, after a $9.5 million proposal to build the township's first middle school was defeated in December.
NEWS
May 11, 1986 | By Marc Narducci, Special to The Inquirer
Alex MacColl began his 17-year tenure as headmaster of Moorestown Friends School in the turbulent late '60s. The country's mood has changed drastically since then, as has Moorestown Friends. Many associates credit MacColl with bringing about positive changes, including the introduction of innovative educational methods. The Moorestown resident, 59, recently announced his resignation from the independent school of 610 students from pre-grade school through 12th grade. He lives at the headmaster's quarters on the 44-acre campus, where there are 60 teachers and six other administrators.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writer
John B. "Jack" Hagner, 83, of Bala Cynwyd, a longtime public accountant, died Monday, Oct. 20, of dementia at Symphony Square Assisted Living & Memory Care. His wife of 27 years, Mary Ellen Yuhas Hagner, said Mr. Hagner started suffering memory loss in 2011 and was diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia. In 2013, he was admitted to Symphony Square. Mr. Hagner worked as a public accountant for 41 years at Ratke, Miller, Hagner & Co. in Philadelphia. It was formerly known as Hagner & Co. after his grandfather and father, who founded the company during the 1930s.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
After 225 years, Westfield Friends School is willing to toot its own horn. Mind you, just a bit. "Our profile is very low," headmaster William C. Probsting says approvingly. "But with big anniversaries like this, we need to move more into the public eye. " Parent Kate Wilson volunteered to publicize the school in advance of its anniversary celebration March 9. She invited me to visit and sent along a chatty e-mail description of academic rigors and student achievements, as well as history.
NEWS
November 10, 2012 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
An administrator of a private school in Brooklyn, N.Y., with a background in science and philosophy will become the next head of Germantown Friends School and the first female to lead the school in more than 140 years. Dana J. Okeson, 48, will assume the post at the Quaker school July 15. The last time Germantown Friends had a woman in charge was in 1869. Okeson, who grew up in Overbrook and is a graduate of Merion Mercy Academy, will succeed Richard L. Wade, who announced a year ago he would retire in June 2013 after leading GFS for 20 years.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An administrator of a private school in Brooklyn, N.Y., with a background in science and philosophy will become the next head of Germantown Friends School and the first female to lead the school in more than 140 years. Dana J. Okeson, 48, will assume the post at the Quaker school July 15. The last time Germantown Friends had a woman in charge was in 1869. Okeson, who grew up in Overbrook and is a graduate of Merion Mercy Academy, will succeed Richard L. Wade, who announced a year ago he would retire in June 2013 after leading GFS for 20 years.
NEWS
May 5, 2011 | By Martha Woodall
INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Martin Luther King High School, one of the city's chronically underachieving schools, will become a Promise Academy in the fall and receive extra funding to launch immediate academic improvements. King's advisory committee of parents, staff, students, and community representatives voted, 8-1, Tuesday for that option, the Philadelphia School District announced Wednesday evening. The decision brings stability to the East Germantown school of 1,100 students, which has been buffeted for weeks by political controversy involving Robert L. Archie Jr., chairman of the School Reform Commission, and State Rep. Dwight Evans (D., Phila.)
NEWS
January 25, 2011 | By Adrienne Lu, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - New Jersey's 15-year-old charter school law should be updated to improve accountability and transparency, according to many of those who testified before the Assembly Education Committee on Monday. The afternoon hearing began what is likely to be months of discussion about charter schools after Gov. Christie this month called for broad changes to the state charter school law. Christie, who also supports a bill that would allow what are essentially school vouchers, wants to increase the number of entities that would be allowed to authorize charter schools, encourage more and different kinds of charter schools, and allow the schools greater flexibility.
NEWS
January 18, 2011 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Plymouth Meeting Friends School, a small elementary school, has chosen a veteran Quaker educator as its next head. The school committee Monday announced that Deborah Kost will succeed Anne Javsicas on July 1. Javsicas is retiring after 22 years as head of school. Kost, who spent 12 years as a teacher and administrator at Friends Select School in Center City, is a former head of Haddonfield Friends School. She now heads the Janus School, a private K-12 school for students with learning differences in Mount Joy, Lancaster County.
NEWS
January 16, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eleanor Kratz Denoon, 94, a former teacher and public relations writer who in 1999 helped set up the Kratz Center for Creative Writing at Goucher College near Baltimore, died of heart disease Jan. 7 at Pennswood Village in Newtown Township, Bucks County. The center, whose director is the novelist Madison Smartt Bell, brings nationally recognized authors to the campus, where each is writer-in-residence for a semester. The writers have included Louise Erdrich, W.S. Merwin, and Robert Stone.
NEWS
December 16, 2005 | By Toni Callas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two Catholic schools in Burlington County, targeted for closure by the Trenton Diocese, met yesterday's deadline for submitting plans to stay open. The diocese recommended last month that St. Peter School in Riverside and Holy Assumption School in Florence, along with Corpus Christi School in Willingboro and All Saints School in Burlington City, face consolidation because of low enrollment and high operating costs. The plan calls for Corpus Christi to be closed and reopen as a regional school.
NEWS
October 8, 2004 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an effort to bring equity to its busing policy, the Downingtown Area School District may just let everyone ride the bus. When the board meets Wednesday, it will vote on a recommendation by its policy committee that the 643 students in the district who now must walk be bused instead. That could add as much as $373,500 a year to the district's $2.9 million transportation budget, though officials said they might be able to reduce that by combining routes. Passage of the measure by the full board is far from certain.
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