CollectionsSchool Dances
IN THE NEWS

School Dances

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 17, 1990 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau The Associated Press contributed to this article
The Supreme Court yesterday left intact a ban on school dances in a small Missouri Bible Belt town, where fundamentalist Christians complained that dancing is sinful, even "satanic. " By refusing to hear the case, the court rejected arguments that the ban imposed by public school officials in rural Purdy, Mo., - and later upheld by a federal appeals court - is religiously motivated and, therefore, violates the constitutionally required separation of church and state. The Supreme Court ruling, which was made without comment, does not mean the justices agreed with the lower court's support of the ban, but was an indication that the court thought the issue not worthy of its time.
NEWS
July 7, 1992 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer correspondent Peter Finn contributed to this story
Henry M. Rowan is a quiet, low-key, downright neighborly kind of guy who lives on a farm, chops his own wood, and doesn't like people to know that he's rich. Yesterday, he announced he was giving $100 million to a New Jersey college that offered to change its name to his. So much for modesty. Here's a guy who dislikes "high society" so much he says he doesn't even know what it is, who bought his wife a Cadillac for the airbag though he thinks the car is too flashy, who says he's not a big philanthropist and who won't come close to revealing how much he's worth.
NEWS
April 30, 2004 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stung by students being drunk at school dances, the West Chester Area School District announced yesterday that it would require junior- and senior-prom-goers to be screened by alcohol-detection devices. "The goal here is to prevent underage drinking; the goal isn't to catch kids," Michael DiBartolomeo, the district's director of secondary education, said yesterday at a news briefing. "We want them to come to the prom and have a great time, without the use of alcohol. " DiBartolomeo said the district bought five devices that detect the presence of alcohol on the breath, but they don't measure blood-alcohol content.
NEWS
January 6, 1986 | By Ginny Wiegand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fights and party-crashers at two recent dances at Cheltenham High School have prompted township commissioners to call for stricter controls by school authorities. "If there are guidelines, they are just not being enforced. There is not proper supervision. I think that's outrageous," said Commissioner Allan H. Reuben last week. Reuben said he was angered at reports of trouble at a Dec. 21 dance sponsored by the high school's Afro-American Students League. One teenager received what police described as a superficial back wound from a screwdriver, a second complained of a sprained finger and a third was arrested at the dance and later charged with underage drinking and disorderly conduct.
NEWS
May 21, 2001 | By Felicity Paxton
Ask a school principal or prom moderator to explain the meaning of prom night and you'll likely hear: "It's about school spirit" or "It celebrates graduation. " There's nothing inherently wrong with such replies, but there is something missing. What no one seems willing to talk about is that prom night is also a mating ritual. Consider how proms are constructed, beginning with the schools. In Philadelphia Catholic schools, students are forbidden to attend proms without a date. Danielle Shegda tried to challenge this back in 1997 and got nowhere fast: Her dad ended up escorting her. In the public schools no such entry rules apply, but the pressure to find a date is often just as fierce.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Darien Seidman, aka "DJ D-Seid," is spinning, mixing, and beat-matching in his father's footsteps. The Shawnee Regional High School senior plays records professionally, like his dad, Daryle, did when he was a student - and still does. And Darien's paternal grandfather, the late Don "DJ Duke" Seidman, kept South Philly school dances hopping. "To be a DJ, you have to feel the music and really be a part of it," explains Darien, 17, who regularly spins at the H2O Beach Club in Berlin Township as well as at Coffee Talk, a java joint in Stone Harbor.
NEWS
March 18, 1996 | By Angela Paik, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They are, of sorts, a people without a homeland. Still, they managed quite a homecoming over the weekend, in a reunion of graduates of a school that has not existed for more than 40 years. About 650 proud graduates of Glen-Nor High School in Delaware County lingered over breakfast and memories at a Malvern hotel yesterday. "This whole thing's been special. Nothing like it," said Tom Tillett, a 1942 graduate and a retired Church of God minister. Tillett was quarterback on a famed football squad at the school: For two seasons it was undefeated, and in one year, no team scored against it. Yesterday, he offered morning church services for his former schoolmates before heading home to Lancaster County.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2012
AT OUR HOUSE, "Soul Train" was must-see TV because it was one of the only TV shows where you could count on seeing brown faces. Negroes, as we were called back then, would be dressed to the nines, wearing the hottest street fashions, huge afros, hot pants, wide-brimmed hats, platform shoes and maxi coats. Good thing fire never broke out in the "Soul Train" studio, because there would have been a polyester meltdown. For me, a black girl with practically no rhythm, "Soul Train" was my classroom, helping me navigate the social minefield of high school dances.
NEWS
May 19, 1996 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The transition from sixth grade to middle school may not be as glamorous as moving on to high school. But for some, the perilous and sometimes scary journey into adolescence can be worse. Students suddenly grapple with several teachers at once. Homework multiplies. Voices crack. Complexions erupt. And, of course, the "girl-boy thing" begins. That's exactly why 400 sixth-grade students came to Mount Laurel's Thomas E. Harrington Middle School for a brief and entertaining orientation last week.
SPORTS
April 2, 1998 | By Marcia C. Smith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sometimes, she takes a break. Rashana Barnes unfolds her long legs and arms, massages the back of her neck touched by her limply lying short braids, and exhales all the tension of her last month. Her eyes want to close. Her body craves the stillness, the silence of unscheduled time. But it's almost midnight. To stop and think about her accomplishments - her 4.0 grade-point average, her student council presidency, her stardom on as the 6-foot-2 center for Catholic League champion West Catholic - might delay her in writing her English paper, the topic: the Laws of Life.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 29, 2013 | Associated Press
READINGTON, N.J. - A school district in Hunterdon County canceled a middle-school dance after the embattled principal received a threatening e-mail. Authorities did not disclose specific details about the threat made against Readington Middle School principal Sharon Moffat. But they said the threat received Friday morning apparently came "from overseas" and was not considered credible. A dance scheduled for Friday night was canceled after the threat was received. District Superintendent Barbara Sargent said township police offered to have an officer at the school, but she said it seemed "more sensible" not to hold the dance.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Darien Seidman, aka "DJ D-Seid," is spinning, mixing, and beat-matching in his father's footsteps. The Shawnee Regional High School senior plays records professionally, like his dad, Daryle, did when he was a student - and still does. And Darien's paternal grandfather, the late Don "DJ Duke" Seidman, kept South Philly school dances hopping. "To be a DJ, you have to feel the music and really be a part of it," explains Darien, 17, who regularly spins at the H2O Beach Club in Berlin Township as well as at Coffee Talk, a java joint in Stone Harbor.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2012
AT OUR HOUSE, "Soul Train" was must-see TV because it was one of the only TV shows where you could count on seeing brown faces. Negroes, as we were called back then, would be dressed to the nines, wearing the hottest street fashions, huge afros, hot pants, wide-brimmed hats, platform shoes and maxi coats. Good thing fire never broke out in the "Soul Train" studio, because there would have been a polyester meltdown. For me, a black girl with practically no rhythm, "Soul Train" was my classroom, helping me navigate the social minefield of high school dances.
NEWS
June 17, 2011 | Associated Press
BIG BEAR LAKE, Calif. - Students at a California high school were asked to turn in their yearbooks after a photo was discovered inside the memory book of two students possibly engaged in a sex act, authorities said yesterday. San Bernardino County investigators were notified Tuesday and Big Bear High School employees and detectives began collecting the yearbooks in the mountain community at Big Bear Lake, 70 miles east of Los Angeles. The background of a school-dance photo shows a 17-year-old boy's hand inside the clothing of a 15-year-old girl in a way that suggests sexual penetration.
SPORTS
October 26, 2008 | By Rick O'Brien INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Over the years, the number of high school mascots seems to have gradually dwindled. One has to search high and low for a decent cartwheeling bear or a push-up-savvy jaguar. However, there are still some schools that hold the tradition of the mascot sacred. One is St. Joseph's Prep. Each year at 1733 Girard Ave., a raucous competition is held in a packed gymnasium to crown a new mascot. To earn the privilege of wearing the eye-catching Hawk costume and continuously flapping the wings through every game, even during time-outs and halftime, three Prep seniors recently battled on the hardwood in front of classmates and teachers.
NEWS
April 30, 2004 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stung by students being drunk at school dances, the West Chester Area School District announced yesterday that it would require junior- and senior-prom-goers to be screened by alcohol-detection devices. "The goal here is to prevent underage drinking; the goal isn't to catch kids," Michael DiBartolomeo, the district's director of secondary education, said yesterday at a news briefing. "We want them to come to the prom and have a great time, without the use of alcohol. " DiBartolomeo said the district bought five devices that detect the presence of alcohol on the breath, but they don't measure blood-alcohol content.
NEWS
May 21, 2001 | By Felicity Paxton
Ask a school principal or prom moderator to explain the meaning of prom night and you'll likely hear: "It's about school spirit" or "It celebrates graduation. " There's nothing inherently wrong with such replies, but there is something missing. What no one seems willing to talk about is that prom night is also a mating ritual. Consider how proms are constructed, beginning with the schools. In Philadelphia Catholic schools, students are forbidden to attend proms without a date. Danielle Shegda tried to challenge this back in 1997 and got nowhere fast: Her dad ended up escorting her. In the public schools no such entry rules apply, but the pressure to find a date is often just as fierce.
NEWS
January 16, 2001 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state is prepared to include what it says is "an extraordinary" funding increase for Philadelphia schools in its next fiscal budget. But the increase by itself is not likely to eliminate the district's chronic deficits. Tim Reeves, Gov. Ridge's spokesman, said that he considered last year's funding increase for Philadelphia - more than $50 million - to have been "extraordinary" and that Ridge would propose at least an equivalent increase, possibly more. Final budget decisions are to be made this week as state officials factor in projections of an economic slowdown, according to Reeves.
NEWS
September 23, 2000 | By Melanie Burney, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Woodrow Wilson High School's senior class is feeling Footloose. They want to hold a dance in their school gym after the annual homecoming game next month. But first, like the characters in the 1984 film, they must persuade the town elders (in this case, the school board) to revoke a longstanding, unwritten policy banning school dances. Accompanied by their class adviser, Nick Timpanelli, senior class president Chantal Williams and class treasurer Asenith Whye, both 17, appeared before the school board Thursday night to make their appeal.
NEWS
January 2, 2000 | By Erin Carroll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Children who were not her own called her "Mom D. " Friends and relatives say they know of no one else who meant so much to so many. Lori Dippolito was the mother, the friend, the community volunteer who never seemed to quit. She had lasagna ready to celebrate a friend's every success; a pick-me-up to counter any tragedy; boundless energy to ensure that her 12-year-old son, Christopher, who is wheelchair-bound with spina bifida, led as normal a life as possible. On Dec. 11, Dippolito, 40, was killed when a car swept across a median and hit her van at the Valley Forge interchange of the Pennsylvania Turnpike.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|