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NEWS
October 27, 1995 | Inquirer photos by Tom Gralish
About 2,800 fifth graders (and some fourth graders, too) came to the Academy of Music yesterday for a special concert of new and old music. Among the players was one almost as young as the students: Violinist Karen Sinclair, 15.
NEWS
February 16, 2005 | By Christopher Paslay
For students and staff at schools around the state, February means more than groundhogs or dead presidents' birthdays: It marks the start of the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment exams. The PSSA is a series of state-mandated tests that measure student performance in the basics - reading, writing and mathematics. The tests also serve as the major tool for documenting a district's academic achievement. Schools not meeting predetermined standards are subject to public criticism and sometimes are overhauled.
NEWS
June 20, 1986 | By Jan Hefler, Special to The Inquirer
The Pennsauken Board of Education, by a 7-1 vote, last night rejected a proposal to lengthen the school day at the high school and middle school, a plan that was aimed at improving scores in the state-mandated proficiency test. Instead, the board approved another plan that will offer extra math instruction to middle school students in need of remedial help. John Ritchie, prinicipal of the middle school, said board members opted for the second plan partly because they felt it would be more effective in improving basic skills.
NEWS
May 5, 1994 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Saturday classes for high school students had a short but successful run last weekend at Octorara Senior High School. Seventy percent of the students in grades nine through 11 braved the fog to make it to school by 8 a.m. Saturday, school officials said this week. Classes ran until 12:15 p.m., with one 15-minute break. The students had to make up four hours of instructional time after the district fell short of the 990 hours for secondary students required to get state financing.
NEWS
April 9, 2004 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the late 1970s, when inflation was rampant and memories of Watergate and the Vietnam War were still raw, Pat Toomey spent part of each school day in a high school history classroom quietly seething. It was the teacher who got under his skin. Too many lectures were about capitalism's failings, corruption in Washington, or how America was no better than the Soviet Union. None of it squared with Toomey's patriotic take on U.S. history or his budding conservative ideology. "I felt we were a great, great country, a great civilization," said Toomey, 42, who has represented the Lehigh Valley and parts of Montgomery County in the House of Representatives since 1999.
NEWS
November 23, 2012
The Cherry Hill Board of Education and its teachers agreed to a new contract this week that extends the school day for middle and high school students. To better understand why, simply do the math. Beginning in September, the school day will begin 30 minutes earlier for secondary students. Elementary teachers will also report a half-hour earlier to prepare before their students arrive. The additional time adds up. Thirty minutes more every day for 180 days is the equivalent of about 14 days in additional classroom or preparation time.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
ANOTHER severe snowstorm, another day of missed instruction. Repeat. The pattern this winter has been unbearable, especially for school administrators. Officials at Monsignor Bonner-Archbishop Prendergast Catholic High School, however, found a way to break the cycle. Principal Bill Brannick and the school's academic board yesterday rolled out Cyber Snow Days, a pilot program aimed at offsetting missed instruction days by having students complete assignments electronically at home.
NEWS
January 5, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Children returned to classes yesterday for the first time since four classmates and 12 other people died in a Christmastime massacre, and one school official described the day as "so close to normal it's scary. " "Just super" was the way high school principal Lloyd Herrick said the 1,150 pupils in the district seemed to be coping in the wake of the slayings of 16 people, all but two from one family. Ronald Gene Simmons Sr., 47, has been charged with two of the slayings. He is expected to be charged with the other 14, all members of his family.
NEWS
May 29, 1988 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Here's the bad thing for 10-year-old Tamara Weiner: Her friend Katy attends the Upper Merion Area School District Extended Day Program only twice weekly. "I wish she would go there the other days," Tamara said. "But now I'm starting to go there less, because I'm kind of capable of staying by myself. " Now, maybe. Four years ago, no way. The after-school extended-day program began when Tamara was a first grader. Before school, she went to a neighbor's house. Now that there is a morning program as well, Tamara arrives at school at 7:30 a.m. "I like the idea of dropping her at school and knowing that she is in good hands," said Judy Weiner, an associate professor of computer science at Temple University.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 23, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Mayor Kenney's administration will select from five to seven schools this summer to become community schools, with the city and private sector providing health, social, emotional, and after-school services. Kenney wants to establish 25 such schools citywide in the next four years. They would be funded with $40 million, paid for by Kenney's proposed sugary-drinks tax as well as contributions from nonprofits and the business community. Schools would not be selected until after City Council approves a budget by June 30, said Susan Gobreski, Kenney's director for community schools.
NEWS
December 19, 2015
TRENTON A bill that would require grade school students to get at least 20 minutes of recess a day was approved by the Assembly on Thursday. If it wins full legislative approval, the law would apply to students in kindergarten through fifth grade. If possible, recess would be held outdoors. "In addition to giving children time to recharge during the school day, recess allows students to develop their social skills and get some physical activity," said Assemblyman Joseph A. Lagana (D., Bergen)
NEWS
November 18, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cheltenham High School was in a "lockout" with increased security Monday after learning that a former student now attending a Maryland college might have retrieved a gun from his parents' home. However, officials at Washington College in Chestertown said the student, Jacob Marberger, had made "no direct threat" against the campus. Police in Maryland and Pennsylvania identified Marberger as a missing person and had no warrants for his arrest. "We received notification early this morning from the parents of sophomore Jacob Marberger that he had returned home and retrieved a firearm," the college said in a notice to students posted early Monday.
FOOD
November 6, 2015 | By Joy Manning, For The Inquirer
Most American 8-year-olds are intimately acquainted with chicken fingers. That breaded-and-fried staple is "kid-friendly" at least in part because of its detachment from the actual chicken - there're no bones or skin or anything that calls a bird to mind. Some people believe bringing farm animals to the kids will actually make them better eaters and more informed food shoppers down the line. And the third graders at Friends School Haverford are more connected to chickens than most kids.
NEWS
October 31, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The firm that has struggled to fill Philadelphia's substitute-teaching vacancies said Thursday that it will pay more in an effort to attract more workers. Source4Teachers will now pay certified teachers who previously worked for the school system $160 per day, up from $110. Long-term certified subs will make $200 per day, up from $140. For those new to the system, the rates jump to $140, $160, or $180 per day, depending on subject area taught, from $110, $125, and $140. The Cherry Hill-based firm was awarded a two-year, $34 million contract to manage substitute services beginning in September.
NEWS
October 15, 2015
EVERY SO OFTEN, my husband and I review our finances and revise our goals. We dig deep into the numbers, often resulting in a reduction in our spending, an increase in our savings or both. Sometimes things are going so well that no changes are needed. With our current work schedules, the start of a new school year and volunteer ministry work, we haven't been able to complete our budget re-examination process, which takes several hours. As we live in this incomplete state of analysis, I've been uneasy because I always like to have a current bird's-eye view of our finances.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
James, 9, loves showing off his artistic skills, in particular drawing, his specialty. He also enjoys almost any physical game, but his favorite is hide-and-seek, which he plays with his 8-year-old sister, Emily. Outgoing and friendly, James is becoming more expressive in communicating. He likes going to school, especially art class. Emily is carefree, with an easy laugh. Playing dress-up, painting her nails, and creating crafts are just a few of her favorite activities. Animals, particularly dogs, are important to her; she is very fond of Buddy, the poodle in her foster home.
NEWS
September 22, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the second day of school, the superintendent was welcoming students back to their classrooms when he was taken aback by one boy's greeting. "My parents want you fired," the boy said. James Wigo, head of the Rose Tree Media School District, tall and with a shaved head, pointed his finger at the student and "aggressively and loudly" told him to sit down and be quiet, according to his mother. Wigo threatened to send the boy to the principal's office and promised he would be back at the school day after day to keep an eye on him. The pupil who drew Wigo's wrath is 6. He is starting first grade at Indian Lane Elementary School.
NEWS
August 30, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Waffiyyah Murray doesn't often come across a kid who doesn't want to ride a bike. But parents are often concerned about safety, especially in congested parts of Philadelphia. Nationwide, the number of students walking and biking to school has steadily declined, from 41 percent in 1969 to 13 percent in 2001, according to the National Center for Safe Routes to School. Meanwhile, the number of children who go to school by car nearly tripled, from 20 to 55 percent. Murray, 30, has a psychology degree from Temple University and was born and raised in Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 21, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
EXAMS ARE around the corner for city students, and nearly every teacher is squeezing in as much instructional time as humanly possible. Not so much at Olney Charter High School, whose charter operator, ASPIRA Inc. of Pennsylvania, has pared back instruction and parent-teacher conferences so staff can attend mandatory meetings to hear what a union would mean for the North Philadelphia school. It's unclear what the cost would be to taxpayers. Unidentified outside consultants will run the informational meetings - some union advocates describe them as an "anti-union" tactic - today, Wednesday and April 28. The aim is "to assist you in making an informed decision on this matter," school board president Frederick Ramirez wrote in an email.
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