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NEWS
October 27, 1995 | Inquirer photos by Tom Gralish
About 2,800 fifth graders (and some fourth graders, too) came to the Academy of Music yesterday for a special concert of new and old music. Among the players was one almost as young as the students: Violinist Karen Sinclair, 15.
NEWS
February 16, 2005 | By Christopher Paslay
For students and staff at schools around the state, February means more than groundhogs or dead presidents' birthdays: It marks the start of the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment exams. The PSSA is a series of state-mandated tests that measure student performance in the basics - reading, writing and mathematics. The tests also serve as the major tool for documenting a district's academic achievement. Schools not meeting predetermined standards are subject to public criticism and sometimes are overhauled.
NEWS
June 20, 1986 | By Jan Hefler, Special to The Inquirer
The Pennsauken Board of Education, by a 7-1 vote, last night rejected a proposal to lengthen the school day at the high school and middle school, a plan that was aimed at improving scores in the state-mandated proficiency test. Instead, the board approved another plan that will offer extra math instruction to middle school students in need of remedial help. John Ritchie, prinicipal of the middle school, said board members opted for the second plan partly because they felt it would be more effective in improving basic skills.
NEWS
May 5, 1994 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Saturday classes for high school students had a short but successful run last weekend at Octorara Senior High School. Seventy percent of the students in grades nine through 11 braved the fog to make it to school by 8 a.m. Saturday, school officials said this week. Classes ran until 12:15 p.m., with one 15-minute break. The students had to make up four hours of instructional time after the district fell short of the 990 hours for secondary students required to get state financing.
NEWS
April 9, 2004 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the late 1970s, when inflation was rampant and memories of Watergate and the Vietnam War were still raw, Pat Toomey spent part of each school day in a high school history classroom quietly seething. It was the teacher who got under his skin. Too many lectures were about capitalism's failings, corruption in Washington, or how America was no better than the Soviet Union. None of it squared with Toomey's patriotic take on U.S. history or his budding conservative ideology. "I felt we were a great, great country, a great civilization," said Toomey, 42, who has represented the Lehigh Valley and parts of Montgomery County in the House of Representatives since 1999.
NEWS
November 23, 2012
The Cherry Hill Board of Education and its teachers agreed to a new contract this week that extends the school day for middle and high school students. To better understand why, simply do the math. Beginning in September, the school day will begin 30 minutes earlier for secondary students. Elementary teachers will also report a half-hour earlier to prepare before their students arrive. The additional time adds up. Thirty minutes more every day for 180 days is the equivalent of about 14 days in additional classroom or preparation time.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
ANOTHER severe snowstorm, another day of missed instruction. Repeat. The pattern this winter has been unbearable, especially for school administrators. Officials at Monsignor Bonner-Archbishop Prendergast Catholic High School, however, found a way to break the cycle. Principal Bill Brannick and the school's academic board yesterday rolled out Cyber Snow Days, a pilot program aimed at offsetting missed instruction days by having students complete assignments electronically at home.
NEWS
January 5, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Children returned to classes yesterday for the first time since four classmates and 12 other people died in a Christmastime massacre, and one school official described the day as "so close to normal it's scary. " "Just super" was the way high school principal Lloyd Herrick said the 1,150 pupils in the district seemed to be coping in the wake of the slayings of 16 people, all but two from one family. Ronald Gene Simmons Sr., 47, has been charged with two of the slayings. He is expected to be charged with the other 14, all members of his family.
NEWS
May 29, 1988 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Here's the bad thing for 10-year-old Tamara Weiner: Her friend Katy attends the Upper Merion Area School District Extended Day Program only twice weekly. "I wish she would go there the other days," Tamara said. "But now I'm starting to go there less, because I'm kind of capable of staying by myself. " Now, maybe. Four years ago, no way. The after-school extended-day program began when Tamara was a first grader. Before school, she went to a neighbor's house. Now that there is a morning program as well, Tamara arrives at school at 7:30 a.m. "I like the idea of dropping her at school and knowing that she is in good hands," said Judy Weiner, an associate professor of computer science at Temple University.
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NEWS
April 21, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
EXAMS ARE around the corner for city students, and nearly every teacher is squeezing in as much instructional time as humanly possible. Not so much at Olney Charter High School, whose charter operator, ASPIRA Inc. of Pennsylvania, has pared back instruction and parent-teacher conferences so staff can attend mandatory meetings to hear what a union would mean for the North Philadelphia school. It's unclear what the cost would be to taxpayers. Unidentified outside consultants will run the informational meetings - some union advocates describe them as an "anti-union" tactic - today, Wednesday and April 28. The aim is "to assist you in making an informed decision on this matter," school board president Frederick Ramirez wrote in an email.
NEWS
April 1, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THERE WAS A PLAN. And then there was real life. An expected walkout of students yesterday at North Penn High School was thwarted by principal Burt Hynes, who pointed out to students that such an action would violate school rules. A group of students had planned the walkout to support the female students involved in a nude-photo scandal that has rocked the Lansdale, Montgomery County, school. North Penn officials confirmed Friday that they were investigating allegations that some North Penn students had shared nude or suggestive photos and videos on the file-sharing site Dropbox.
NEWS
March 11, 2015 | BY BOB STEWART, Daily News Staff Writer stewarr@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
SHOTS RANG OUT next to a North Philly school and a day-care center yesterday, and police said one man was killed. The crime scene just north of Lehigh Avenue stretched from George Clymer Elementary School at 12th and Rush streets to 12th and Somerset, a half-block away. Two men were shot just before 5 p.m., police said. Cops took both victims to Temple University Hospital, where one, a 25-year-old man, was pronounced dead about 30 minutes after the shooting. The other man, in his 20s, was fighting for his life after being shot twice in the head, according to Lt. John Stanford, a police spokesman.
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a frantic six-week fund-raising campaign, students and staff at St. Paul School breathed a huge sigh of relief Thursday. Faced with a do-or-die, they rallied to raise more than the $250,000 needed to save the parish school in Burlington City. Principal William Robbins called it a miracle. "We did it," Robbins said. "We raised a quarter of a million dollars. Who would have thought it?" Students and staff heard the news during morning prayer at the start of the school day. "They all gave a standing ovation and cheered," the principal said.
NEWS
December 20, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Behold, the jawnament! Delicate, wooden - and singularly Philly - the holiday handcraft is the latest offering from student entrepreneurs at the Workshop School, a project-based public school whose innovations have won national recognition. The school's teens are best known for building a fuel-efficient fast car that made its way to the White House. The jawnament may not get a nod from the president, but it's clever enough to be the top seller of Workshop Industries, the after-school club where students create items to sell to the public using the tools at their disposal: laser cutters, 3-D printers, sophisticated computer-assisted design software.
NEWS
November 13, 2014 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police are investigating how a bag of bullets ended up in the common area of a Main Line Hebrew school Wednesday, prompting a major law enforcement response and an early end to the school day. "There was never a threat or any type of imminent threat," Lt. Andy Block, a Radnor police spokesman, said of the discovery before noon of the ammunition at the Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy on South Bryn Mawr Avenue. He said officers and dogs from the Radnor and Haverford police departments did a security check of the school and, because of the hour of the day, students were dismissed early.
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Rita Giordano and Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writers
Sleep-deprived teenagers of New Jersey, take heart. One state senator thinks you deserve a break. Sen. Richard J. Codey (D., Essex) introduced a bill this week that would require the state Department of Education to study the issues, benefits, and options involved in instituting a later school-day start time for middle and high schoolers. He said an impetus for the legislation was a recent report by the American Academy of Pediatrics that calls insufficient sleep among the nation's adolescents an "epidemic" and "an important public health issue" with far-reaching impacts on physical and mental health, safety, and school performance.
NEWS
October 1, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
ONE UPPER DARBY mother took her parenting cues from LL Cool J's "Mama Said Knock You Out," when she urged her daughter to fight another girl in the parking lot of a gas station on Friday afternoon, police said. "She flunked Parenting 101," said Upper Darby Police Superintendent Michael Chitwood. "Kids are kids but parents that push them to have a fight, that makes no sense whatsoever. " This month's contender for mother of the year, Nicole Holton, 36, was shameless when police broke up the fight and tried to get to the bottom of how it started, Chitwood said.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
The estate of a 12-year-old girl who died after suffering an asthma attack at a West Philadelphia elementary school - that at the time did not have a nurse on duty - has lodged a wrongful-death suit against the School District. The lawsuit, filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court, seeks damages in the Sept. 25, 2013, death of Laporshia Massey. Also named as defendants were the school, its principal, and Laporshia's teacher. According to the suit, Laporshia was attending classes at Bryant Elementary School, at 6001 Cedar Ave., when she began having difficulty breathing.
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