CollectionsSchool Day
IN THE NEWS

School Day

NEWS
December 6, 1998 | By Jane R. Eisner, Editor of the Editorial Page
Darkness hugs the streets outside the Pennypacker Elementary School in East Mount Airy on this late autumn afternoon, so that the large and looming building looks even more imposing. The grilled doors are shut tight. Inside, hallways accustomed to the shouts and sizzle of students are keeping their secrets. But down in the basement, the school has a voice. Many voices, actually. The first graders are excitedly showing off their bubble gum inventions. The second and third graders are learning about Alexander Graham Bell on new computers, with the gentle encouragement of a roving aide.
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | By Nancy Lawson and Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
This is not a leap year, but the Tredyffrin/Easttown School District plans to add days to February nonetheless. At a special meeting scheduled for Monday at 5 p.m. at the Educational Services Center in Berwyn, the board will consider eliminating this month's previously scheduled holidays. The goal is to make up for some of the 10 days missed in January because of inclement weather. The district had four days allotted in its calendar. The board will consider making Feb. 18 and 21 full days of instruction.
NEWS
June 20, 1993 | By Judy Baehr, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The day was billed as "Past Meets Present. " Students at Haddon Heights' Seventh Avenue Elementary School last week invited their grandparents, great-grandparents, elderly neighbors and members of the borough's Forever Young Club to share a day at school with them. "The interaction between the generations is really wonderful to see," said principal Linda Steenrod. "It's great for the kids to meet older people doing all kinds of different things, and it's good for the seniors to get out and meet some great kids.
NEWS
January 28, 1998 | By Russell J. Rickford, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Its foes said it constituted weird classroom science, plugged from a petri dish of experimental teaching techniques. Its friends called it right-headed classroom engineering, an elixir for the daily drone of assembly-line learning. The school board last night fell in with the friends, giving "the Glassboro Plan" its nod and ensuring that the high school will shift to a block schedule in the 1998-99 academic year. In a 6-2 vote last night, the board adopted the format. Under block scheduling, the traditional eight-period school day will be repackaged to four periods with the time span for each course swelling from 42 to 85 minutes.
NEWS
February 19, 1997 | By Natalie Kostelni, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
First, Spring-Ford High School students were told to start school a few minutes earlier, and now, elementary school students in the district might start school 25 minutes later. During a work session Monday, school board members supported a move to delay the start of the school day by 25 minutes for Royersford and Spring City Elementary Schools. Starting next year, the first school bell will ring at 8:50 a.m. instead of 8:25 a.m. The school day will end at 3:30 p.m. instead of 3:05 p.m. The board will formally vote on the matter at its Monday meeting.
NEWS
November 21, 1999 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Child Evangelism Fellowship has operated "good news clubs" in private homes in Pennsylvania since 1940. At the meetings, children age 5 to 12 learn Bible lessons in a casual setting that incorporates games and crafts. The free, nondenominational program depends strongly on volunteers willing to be trained and to open their homes to the youngsters. Three years ago, Donna Weiss, who has directed the Delaware County program for 16 years, decided to take advantage of a 1952 Supreme Court ruling that established the constitutionality of "release time," or off-site religious instruction during school hours.
NEWS
September 26, 2007 | Eugene W. Hickok and Anthony Williams
Eugene W. Hickok is senior policy director at Dutko Worldwide Anthony Williams is a Pennsylvania state senator As discussions surrounding the reauthorization of President Bush's No Child Left Behind Act move into full swing in Washington, there is widespread disagreement over what a revised law might look like. Interestingly, more support may be coming from Democrats than Republicans. The education chairs in both chambers, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D., Mass.) and Rep. George Miller (D., Calif.
NEWS
December 24, 1996 | By Christian Davenport, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Haverford school board has voted, 6-3, to ratify a three-year teacher contract that calls for a slightly longer school day and modest annual salary increases. Teachers have been working without a contract since Aug. 31, when a three-year pact expired. The new contract, agreed to last week, is retroactive to Nov. 18, when a tentative agreement was reached, and extends through the 1998-99 school year. In late August, the board and the 340-member Haverford Township Education Association reached agreement on salaries, health benefits and the length of the school year.
NEWS
October 19, 1999 | By Shannon O'Boye, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The school board last night told about 30 parents that the after-school music program for fifth graders would soon be up and running, but many parents still expressed concerns. "This is a Band-Aid on a patient that needs a heart transplant," said David Fox, a parent who taught the instrumental music program for a year before taking a full-time job in another district. Superintendent Robert Suessmuth told parents in a letter dated Sept. 23 that the program was to be canceled this year because the district was unable to find enough qualified teachers.
SPORTS
February 24, 2000 | By Pete Schnatz, FOR THE INQUIRER
Erica Jerez was too excited to sit down. Fueled by a pancake breakfast, the 8-year-old second grader remained in constant motion, dancing to the rhythms blared over the First Union Spectrum sound system and cheering every move the Kixx made on the floor. Jerez and nearly three dozen of her classmates from Holy Name School in Camden rarely used their seats as the Kixx drubbed the Wichita Wings, 19-9, in the team's second annual School Day Game. The soccer was nothing like the sport she plays at home with her sisters, but Jerez said she was "having a great time" nonetheless.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|