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School Day

NEWS
October 11, 2003 | By Connie Langland INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Not a glum face was in sight yesterday as children hopped off buses and jumped out of minivans to scamper into Simmons Elementary School in Horsham, where teachers were at work for the first time in more than two weeks. At Simmons and six other schools in the eastern Montgomery County district, classes resumed yesterday for 5,600 students after a contract dispute was settled in unpublicized bargaining on Thursday. "It's been a very, very smooth transition back into education," said Curtis Griffin, assistant superintendent, who toured the schools yesterday morning.
NEWS
August 10, 1997 | By Lisa Shafer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Twenty-four days before 10,200 Neshaminy students go back to school, their teachers have no contract with the school board and worry they may be forced to strike. Members of the Neshaminy Federation of Teachers have abandoned all the extra work they usually do to prepare for a new year. After school resumes, they say they will work only during paid hours - seven hours each school day - until an agreement is reached. A strike would be the next step for the 709 teachers, said John Rock, chief negotiator for the union.
NEWS
June 30, 2000 | By Melanie D. Scott, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After entering into executive session, the 11-member Lenape Regional High School District Board of Education unanimously approved a three-year agreement Wednesday night that will raise salaries and extend the workday for members of the Lenape District Education Association. Salaries will increase 4.2 percent in 2000-01 and 4.1 percent in both 2001-02 and 2002-03 for the association, which represents at least 600 teachers, teachers' aides, secretaries and athletic trainers in the Lenape, Cherokee and Shawnee High Schools.
SPORTS
February 22, 2001 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a day for the Kixx to enjoy things in gigantic proportions. The tallest player, the largest crowd, a huge milestone and one of the biggest Kixx wins of the year were all wrapped up in a single indoor soccer game. It was also a day that began very early, with an unusual starting time of 10:35 a.m., but the Kixx were anything but bleary-eyed and defeated Harrisburg, 14-4, at the First Union Spectrum. The Kixx' crisp performance took a backseat to the crowd, a team-record 16,713.
NEWS
October 31, 2000 | By Dale Mezzacappa and Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Philadelphia teachers will vote Thursday on a tentative contract hammered out just before dawn - keeping the district's schools open for 210,000 students yesterday - that adds a half hour to the school day and gives union members raises totaling 14.7 percent over four years. Pushed by the threat of a state takeover of the district - and by the prospect of shutting schools due to a work stoppage for the first time in 19 years - the city and its teachers' union negotiated for more than 15 hours before reaching the agreement around 5:40 a.m. yesterday.
NEWS
March 24, 1999 | By Evan Halper, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ariel Hanson describes her first-period calculus class as "like being under water. " Her hands sometimes go numb. The teacher's voice is a gurgle. And through blurred peripheral vision, Hanson sees dazed, motionless students barely alert enough to blink. Calculus should be among Hanson's favorite classes. The 18-year-old senior at Central Bucks West High School is on her way to studying engineering at Boston's Northeastern University next year. But with high school starting at 7:30 a.m., she says, it's a struggle even to show up. "We had someone in the middle of the aisle last week using their coat as a pillow," said Hanson, who has been lobbying for two years to get the district to start school later in the morning.
NEWS
May 11, 2000 | By Michelle Jeffery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Upper Dublin school board has voted to add an extra period to the school day at Sandy Run Middle School. Come September, students will attend eight classes each day, which school officials say will allow them more time for music lessons, foreign-language instruction, and technology classes. Principal Margaret Thomas was pleased. "This will really benefit our students," she said. The school day, which starts at 7:49 a.m. and ends at 2:42 p.m., will not be lengthened.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
The estate of a 12-year-old girl who died after suffering an asthma attack at a West Philadelphia elementary school - that at the time did not have a nurse on duty - has lodged a wrongful-death suit against the School District. The lawsuit, filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court, seeks damages in the Sept. 25, 2013, death of Laporshia Massey. Also named as defendants were the school, its principal, and Laporshia's teacher. According to the suit, Laporshia was attending classes at Bryant Elementary School, at 6001 Cedar Ave., when she began having difficulty breathing.
NEWS
November 22, 1992 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer correspondent Lyn A.E. McCafferty contributed to this article
The Philadelphia School District is about to give new meaning to the old saying that time is money. For proof, look in the nearest city high school cafeteria come January. That's where the district's leadership has gone for a solution to a long- standing problem - one that's costing millions a year. Philadelphia's secondary school day is among the shortest in the country. So short that most city high schools and middle schools fail to meet the state's minimum requirement of 990 hours of instruction in at least 180 days.
NEWS
March 30, 1998 | By Happy Fernandez
We all have seen them hanging out on the corner during the school day. On any given day in Philadelphia, 30,000 public school students are not in school. Why? The reasons are varied and often harrowing. But there is good news to report. The City of Philadelphia is embarking on a renewed effort to reduce truancy - and it's working. Reducing truancy is an effective crime reduction measure and a proven tool to help protect our kids from crime and violence. Truancy is an early warning sign, a signal of possible trouble at home, at school or in the neighborhood.
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