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School Day

NEWS
October 2, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The blueberry muffins are Calvin Bell's favorites, but Monday's apple muffins, plus accompanying pears, clearly hit the spot for the Camden sixth grader and his classmates, who were tucking into their school-provided breakfasts served up during homeroom. "A-OK," was Calvin's verdict. "Delicious. " Last year, his school, Camden's D.U.E. Season Charter School, greatly increased the number of students served the morning meal, according to a new report, by turning to "breakfast after the bell" - offering free and reduced-priced breakfast after the school day's start instead of before it. Calvin, 11, gave the practice a thumbs-up, too. "When you don't eat, you concentrate on your stomach," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By Samantha Melamed, For The Inquirer
Come September, most kids can count on one thing: the start of school. But many families make sure their students-to-be can rely on something else: a personal back-to-school tradition. From baked goods that serve as tokens of parental support to those first-day-of-class photo sessions, moms say it gives them and their kids something to look forward to each year, and helps just a little to ease the first-day jitters. Mimi Larkin has a great deal of experience with the subject: 14 years to be precise.
NEWS
September 5, 2013 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Our daughter came into the room to model her outfit, a sweet top and circle skirt, as she might for one of her first days of elementary school. Except it's not. It is her last first day of school. She is thrilled. We are, decidedly, less so. As a friend said of her son over the weekend, "He's still a junior until school starts. " And then school starts, a moment of annual delight that has been rendered bittersweet. This is our second child, our last. Her brother left two autumns ago. The parting was easier knowing she was still around.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Orlando R. Barone
My first dog loved me and I her. Queenie would sit on my house's back stoop and await my arrival from school. I'd open the gate and hear her whimper some 50 feet away. As we eyed each other, she would begin swaying anxiously. I'd stoop down, place my book bag on the ground, and still she stayed put. Then I would put my hands out and yell, "Here, Queenie," and only then would the little cocker spaniel leap from the stoop and run, ears flapping behind her head, into my waiting arms.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Martha Woodall and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Gov. Corbett's administration - along with city and state officials - is working to assemble a funding package that could pump as much as $100 million more into the coffers of the Philadelphia School District, according to sources with knowledge of the high-level talks. But the money, which could include federal funds the state would send to the cash-strapped district, might come with hefty strings attached, they said. The additional aid would be contingent on the district's ability to obtain major concessions from the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, including requiring teachers to work a longer school day and contribute to their health-care coverage, sources said.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | BY ARDEN KASS
RECENTLY I took part in one of the most powerful and essential events I have ever attended. About two dozen parents and about 20 schoolchildren from several Philadelphia public schools took ourselves, along with 4,000 letters written to legislators by students K-12, to Harrisburg. Our goal was to personally deliver the letters and our opinion on the current school budget crisis to Gov. Corbett. We decided to go to Harrisburg to give our legislators and their leader the opportunity to make a firsthand connection between the numbers on their spreadsheets and the faces of the human beings standing in their offices and in the Rotunda.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By John W. Schmehl and F. Frederic Fouad
Upon his death in 1831, Stephen A. Girard, industrialist and philanthropist, endowed Philadelphia's Girard College with what was then the largest private charitable donation in U.S. history. Pursuant to the era's thinking on social problems, the facility housed and educated white male orphans, enabling them to achieve more productive lives. In 1968, the college was opened to minorities after a long legal struggle led by William T. Coleman Jr. of the law firm Dilworth Paxson, founded by a legendary reformist Philadelphia mayor.
NEWS
April 30, 2013
New Jersey ranks among the bottom states for school-breakfast participation. And when Garden State schools do serve breakfast, it's typically at the wrong time. That needs to change. Across the state, 525 school districts provide the most important meal of the day to low-income students who otherwise might not get breakfast. But most serve breakfast before the first classes begin, and many students who can't get to school that early start the day hungry. Their learning often suffers as a result.
NEWS
April 26, 2013
By Nathan Mains Every school day in Pennsylvania, 82 high school students leave school after classes - and never return. That's more than 14,000 school dropouts last year across the commonwealth. Fifty-four of Pennsylvania's 598 high schools are considered among the nation's lowest performers, meaning that fewer than 60 percent of freshmen progress to their senior year on time. Dropping out of school isn't just a stigma - it's a life-changing disadvantage with wide-ranging implications and the issue is dogged by troubling questions around who's dropping out, the reasons for the exodus, and the societal and economic consequences.
NEWS
April 20, 2013
By William C. Kashatus When I was a teenager in the 1970s, I refused to get out of bed for school at 6 a.m. It got so bad that my mother threatened to pour ice water over my head. Not until my father took away the car keys did I force myself to roll off the mattress and become the grouchy morning person who trudged off to school. Forty years later, my adolescent son is exhibiting the same early-morning behavior. Just like his teenaged father, he's trying to get an education, play sports, and hold down a weekend job on less than six hours of sleep each night; not nearly enough rest for an adolescent who lives in a 24/7 culture.
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