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NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By John W. Schmehl and F. Frederic Fouad
Upon his death in 1831, Stephen A. Girard, industrialist and philanthropist, endowed Philadelphia's Girard College with what was then the largest private charitable donation in U.S. history. Pursuant to the era's thinking on social problems, the facility housed and educated white male orphans, enabling them to achieve more productive lives. In 1968, the college was opened to minorities after a long legal struggle led by William T. Coleman Jr. of the law firm Dilworth Paxson, founded by a legendary reformist Philadelphia mayor.
NEWS
April 30, 2013
New Jersey ranks among the bottom states for school-breakfast participation. And when Garden State schools do serve breakfast, it's typically at the wrong time. That needs to change. Across the state, 525 school districts provide the most important meal of the day to low-income students who otherwise might not get breakfast. But most serve breakfast before the first classes begin, and many students who can't get to school that early start the day hungry. Their learning often suffers as a result.
NEWS
April 26, 2013
By Nathan Mains Every school day in Pennsylvania, 82 high school students leave school after classes - and never return. That's more than 14,000 school dropouts last year across the commonwealth. Fifty-four of Pennsylvania's 598 high schools are considered among the nation's lowest performers, meaning that fewer than 60 percent of freshmen progress to their senior year on time. Dropping out of school isn't just a stigma - it's a life-changing disadvantage with wide-ranging implications and the issue is dogged by troubling questions around who's dropping out, the reasons for the exodus, and the societal and economic consequences.
NEWS
April 20, 2013
By William C. Kashatus When I was a teenager in the 1970s, I refused to get out of bed for school at 6 a.m. It got so bad that my mother threatened to pour ice water over my head. Not until my father took away the car keys did I force myself to roll off the mattress and become the grouchy morning person who trudged off to school. Forty years later, my adolescent son is exhibiting the same early-morning behavior. Just like his teenaged father, he's trying to get an education, play sports, and hold down a weekend job on less than six hours of sleep each night; not nearly enough rest for an adolescent who lives in a 24/7 culture.
NEWS
March 14, 2013 | Jeff Rosenberg, For the Daily News
I AM A Philadelphia School District (PSD) teacher in my 36th year, and what has really gotten stuck in my craw most has been the imperial, patronizing manner in which the PSD leadership has been conducting its business. Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. arrived six months ago spouting transparency and community engagement, but what we've mostly gotten has been something far less. School Reform Commission Chairman Pedro Ramos and the SRC set the stage by surreptitiously hiring an attorney to lobby the state Legislature to increase the power of the SRC to impose working conditions.
NEWS
March 7, 2013
Teachers have long stressed the "three R's" - reading, writing, and arithmetic - as fundamental to learning. It's time to bring back another R: recess. In their well-intentioned emphasis on academics and standardized test scores, schools across the country have eliminated recess. Today, only 40 percent of public schools offer a play period. It's time to reconsider recess' benefits for students' minds as well as their bodies. Expecting elementary-school children to sit in classrooms for hours on end may actually hurt the learning process.
NEWS
March 2, 2013 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
William R. Hite Jr. wants you to know: He does not want to drive teachers out of the Philadelphia School District. The superintendent says he doesn't want to take away their water fountains, desks, or privileges to leave the building during their lunch periods. He's not after students' books and he doesn't want to increase class sizes. "We believe teachers are professionals, just like architects, lawyers, doctors," Hite said Thursday in an interview. "We want a contract that reflects that.
NEWS
February 24, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE SCHOOL DISTRICT announced Friday that it will recommend nine schools to become renaissance schools, a district initiative aimed at turning around low-performing schools. Two of the selected schools - Strawberry Mansion High and McMichael Elementary - were on the district's proposed school closure list last week, but on Tuesday, the district announced that both would stay open. Strawberry Mansion, Edison High, and Barry, Bryant, Cayuga and McMichael elementaries were recommended to be Promise Academies.
SPORTS
February 7, 2013 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writer silaryt@phillynews.com
MANY COLLEGE kids change their major once or twice, then accept their degree and wind up working in an entirely different field. Somehow, it's impossible to envision Jared Jackson traveling down that winding road. "I've wanted to be a doctor since I was 2 or 3 years old," he said. Two or three? That early? "Yes," he said. "I had the little stethoscope around my neck. Played with the fake X-ray toy . . . Be a doctor. That's all I wanted to do. " In time, Jackson, a 6-1, 215-pound defensive end, also began mixing in football and Wednesday morning he was part of a wonderful, in-the-gym ceremony at Imhotep Charter, which last fall captured Public League and City Titles at the Class AA level and advanced to a state semifinal.
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