CollectionsSchool Day
IN THE NEWS

School Day

NEWS
January 25, 2013
If breakfast is the most important meal of the day, why are so many public-school students needlessly going hungry? Only 35 percent of New Jersey's 471,714 children eligible for a free or reduced-price meal received breakfast at school last year. That's among the lowest participation rates in the country. New Jersey ranks 46th in the number of low-income students who get breakfast at school. Pennsylvania is 36th. Nationally, only about 50 percent of students in the reduced or free lunch program eat a school breakfast.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Arvel Wells-Kargbo, 56, of East Mount Airy, a longtime Philadelphia teacher and principal who dedicated her career to raising standards for Philadelphia schoolchildren, died Thursday, Jan. 10, of cardiac arrest. Mrs. Wells-Kargbo, principal of the Mary McLeod Bethune Elementary School at the time of her death, grew up in North Philadelphia and graduated from Gratz High School in 1974. She earned a bachelor's degree at Morgan State University and master's degree at Antioch College, and had finished studies for her doctorate in education at Nova Southeastern University, her husband, Molson Kargbo, said.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By Emily Babay and Jessica Parks, Breaking News Desk
Pottsgrove Middle School was evacuated this morning because several students were hospitalized after passing out, but investigators found no environmental hazard in the building. A call about medical emergencies at the school, located at 1351 N. Hanover St., came in shortly after 10:15 a.m., according to Montgomery County dispatchers. The Pottsgrove School District said three students fainted during a choral practice. As medical responders were treating those students, others reported that they felt light-headed or dizzy.
NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Josh Lederman, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Open your notebooks, and sharpen your pencils. School for thousands of public school students is about to get quite a bit longer. Five states announced Monday that they will add at least 300 hours of learning time to the calendar in some schools starting in 2013. Colorado, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, and Tennessee will take part in the initiative, which is intended to boost student achievement and make U.S. schools more competitive globally. The three-year pilot program will affect almost 20,000 students in 40 schools, with long-term hopes of expanding the program to include additional schools - especially those that serve low-income communities.
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Starting in the fall, Cherry Hill secondary students will begin school a half-hour earlier each morning. Which sounds like no big deal. Unless you've got kids, or are one. "I hate it," says Josh Lovell, 15, a Cherry Hill West freshman. "I hate getting up. " Some parents don't like the prospect of high schools starting classes at 7:30 a.m. either. They cite studies suggesting teens learn better with a good night's sleep and worry that Cherry Hill students already are stressed out and sleep-deprived.
NEWS
November 28, 2012
By Jonathan Zimmerman The Cherry Hill Board of Education and its teachers recently agreed on a new contract that extends the school day by 30 minutes. Over the course of a 180-day school year, that comes out to about 14 more days of class. But it probably won't make much of a difference, at least not for high school students. That's because the board tacked the additional time onto the beginning of the day, forcing high school kids to show up for school at 7:30 a.m. instead of 8. They won't be awake.
NEWS
November 23, 2012
The Cherry Hill Board of Education and its teachers agreed to a new contract this week that extends the school day for middle and high school students. To better understand why, simply do the math. Beginning in September, the school day will begin 30 minutes earlier for secondary students. Elementary teachers will also report a half-hour earlier to prepare before their students arrive. The additional time adds up. Thirty minutes more every day for 180 days is the equivalent of about 14 days in additional classroom or preparation time.
NEWS
November 21, 2012
The Cherry Hill Board of Education unanimously ratified a contract with the district's teachers Monday night that will extend the school day for middle and high school students. The Cherry Hill Education Association voted last week to accept the two-year pact, which is retroactive to July 1. The average salary increase is 3.36 percent during the current academic year and 2.93 percent in 2013-14. In addition, the school day will begin 30 minutes earlier for secondary students and teachers, starting in the fall.
NEWS
November 18, 2012 | By Dan Hardy, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Cherry Hill Board of Education will vote Monday night whether to ratify a tentative two-year contract agreement with district professional and support staff that increases instructional time for middle and high school students by a half-hour a day and increases elementary teachers' time in school by the same amount. Members of the 1,070-member Cherry Hill Education Association approved the contract Thursday by a sizable majority, said union president Martin Sharofsky. The increase in middle and high school instruction time, which will be added to the beginning of the school day starting next fall, amounts to about 14 additional days, the district said in a statement.
NEWS
November 10, 2012 | By Dan Hardy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Traditionally, the second week of November - election week - marks a break in New Jersey's public school education schedule. By state law, the schools close on the Thursday and Friday following Election Day for the annual New Jersey Education Association convention in Atlantic City. The convention, one of Atlantic City's largest, usually brings about 30,000 delegates, teachers, and support staffers to the Shore for two days. Some districts also have Veterans Day off, making it a four-day weekend; some schedule the whole week off for students.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|