CollectionsSchool Holidays
IN THE NEWS

School Holidays

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 30, 1994
With two months of winter ahead, it's time for parents, educators and public officials to put behind them weeks of second-guessing and emotional Sturm und Drang and put children's educational needs first. January's unprecedented storms - since Christmas, there's been one roughly every five days, the National Weather Service says - forced record numbers of school closings and an administrative dilemma. How should schedules be arranged so that children are in school for the required number of days this year?
NEWS
July 12, 1987 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
Downingtown school officials plan to hold a hearing Wednesday on the $3 million plan to renovate Beaver Creek Elementary School. Although the plans to add eight classrooms, a music and art room, and a library are estimated to cost about $1 million more than expected, the board last week voted 7-1, with one abstention, to approve the project. Board member Nancy Glenn voted against the project, saying that earlier this year, the board had been told that it would cost approximately $2.2 million.
NEWS
October 30, 1988 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
The Interboro Latch Key Program will begin serving youngsters in kindergarten through sixth grade on Nov. 14. Superintendent Edmond O. Sacchetti announced during the Interboro school board's meeting Wednesday that the after-school care program had been approved by the Interboro Board of School Directors. The program had been proposed in August by board President Susan P. Jacobs. "There is a growing need in our community for after-school care, and we want to provide that care for our residents for as low a cost as possible without placing any additional costs on our taxpayers," Jacobs said during an earlier meeting.
NEWS
November 23, 1996 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marie C. Beucler, 61, a retired high school teacher for the William Penn School District in Delaware County, died of heart failure Thursday at Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital in Camden. She was a lifelong resident of Merchantville, N.J. Miss Beucler taught English at the district's Pennwood High School in Lansdowne from its inception in 1982 until retiring in April. She also was the National Honor Society adviser there. She previously taught for 10 years at the former Yeadon Junior and Senior High School, Moorestown High School in Moorestown, N.J., and at Bok Vocational-Technical High School and Kensington High School, both in Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 17, 1987 | By Paul Scicchitano, Special to The Inquirer
Amid the usual lunchtime clamor in the North Penn High School cafeteria on Wednesday, Michele Thinnes, a senior, was mulling over a colorful jar full of pina colada, blueberry and other exotic-flavored jellybeans. "Four-thousand, two hundred and sixty-one jellybeans," she guessed as the number of jellybeans in the large glass jar, and then she handed a quarter to Robert Baranick, 17, keeper of the gourmet-flavored globs of glucose. If Thinnes' guess was closest to the actual number, she would win what looked to be a lifetime supply of the holiday candies.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | By Gwen Florio, Inquirer Staff Writer
You're a kid. It's time for the family vacation. You know what that means. Sleeping in late. Sand castles. Thunder Mountain. Homework. Whoa. Back up a minute. Homework? This is supposed to be a holiday, right? Not necessarily. Especially if your family's vacation doesn't jibe with school holidays - which, according to area school districts and travel agencies, is something that's happening a lot these days. "When we were youngsters, our parents would never have thought of taking you out of school," said Sister Barbara Foy, principal at the School of the Holy Child in the Drexel Hill section of Delaware County.
NEWS
August 15, 1990 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
School holidays could be eliminated and spring break cut short if the new addition to Pemberton Township High School is not completed by the school district's scheduled opening day on Sept. 6, officials said. But Superintendent Robert J. Moore said he was "very optimistic" that the expansion would be finished by the deadline; officials will know for sure by today. "This will give us some leeway in knowing how this is going to all turn out," Moore said. "It will give us time to get things in order and inform everyone about the projected day for opening.
NEWS
August 1, 2000 | by Mensah M. Dean, Daily News Staff Writer
While others still slept, before the principal had even arrived, and as a work crew smoothed out the last bit of parking lot asphalt, parents and children yesterday began flocking to the new, three-story school building at B Street and Olney Avenue. It was the first day of classes for 700 middle-school children enrolled at the School District's first "year-round" school. "I look forward to it, the whole idea: uniforms and keeping them in school a little longer, because by August their minds go to mush," said Michelle Wallace, whose daughter Kendra, 10, is starting sixth grade.
NEWS
September 23, 2012
Siobhan A. Reardon is president and director of the Free Library of Philadelphia Every day, the Free Library of Philadelphia works to advance literacy, guide learning, and inspire curiosity for all who come through our doors. And at 3:15 each weekday afternoon, our branches throughout the city welcome a rush of some of our most creative, curious, and clever customers - Philadelphia's students. Whether they attend public, charter, private, or parochial school, these students gather together daily at the Free Library to read, interact, learn, and grow.
NEWS
May 5, 1993
ABOLISH ALL SCHOOL HOLIDAYS, A PASTOR SUGGESTS So Philadelphia's Muslims want public schools closed in observance of their holidays? One is tempted to say, "OK, we'll do that when the Islamic nations close their schools for Jewish and Christian holidays. " But that would be too easy. In fact, why shouldn't school holidays be set aside for any cult or sect that can raise enough adherents to make a fuss about official "oppression" or "discrimination"? Who has the right to refuse them?
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 23, 2012
Siobhan A. Reardon is president and director of the Free Library of Philadelphia Every day, the Free Library of Philadelphia works to advance literacy, guide learning, and inspire curiosity for all who come through our doors. And at 3:15 each weekday afternoon, our branches throughout the city welcome a rush of some of our most creative, curious, and clever customers - Philadelphia's students. Whether they attend public, charter, private, or parochial school, these students gather together daily at the Free Library to read, interact, learn, and grow.
NEWS
December 26, 2005 | By Linda Moser
After the Thanksgiving turkey has been stripped and dumped, we're on to the next holiday - and the next controversy. Because when the air turns crisp and Christmas jingles jam the airwaves, one topic is practically guaranteed to begin rearing its monstrous head at PTA meetings and homeroom parties: religion. Not that religion is monstrous, mind you, but people can be - especially if they feel their religion is given short shrift at school. In typical fashion, one PTA member brings up the "holiday tree.
NEWS
December 23, 2004 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fearing that classmates might misconstrue his motives, eighth grader Carter Bowman discreetly slipped chocolate-covered pretzels and Christmas ornaments into his teachers' mailboxes after school this week. "You really don't want to look like you're sucking up to the teacher," said Bowman, 13, of Doylestown. "But I wanted to give them a little token of thanks. " As students deposit boxes of candy, plates of cookies and jars of candles on teachers' desks today, teachers will be left to assess whether policy permits them to accept the gifts.
NEWS
August 1, 2000 | by Mensah M. Dean, Daily News Staff Writer
While others still slept, before the principal had even arrived, and as a work crew smoothed out the last bit of parking lot asphalt, parents and children yesterday began flocking to the new, three-story school building at B Street and Olney Avenue. It was the first day of classes for 700 middle-school children enrolled at the School District's first "year-round" school. "I look forward to it, the whole idea: uniforms and keeping them in school a little longer, because by August their minds go to mush," said Michelle Wallace, whose daughter Kendra, 10, is starting sixth grade.
NEWS
February 18, 2000 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
On Monday, Presidents Day, Kimberly Fleming will be on the job as a receptionist at a Mount Airy medical office. Her first-grade son will be off for the day, though, shuttled off to his grandmother's home. "She's OK with it," a confident Fleming said yesterday. Cynthia Rice, an outreach and service coordinator for a private nonprofit agency, is off for the day, as are two school-age daughters. They'll still be learning at their Southwest Philadelphia home. "I have my kids at their books," she said with pride.
NEWS
January 17, 2000 | By Lisa Fine, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When children stay home from schools in West Chester today, it will be in part because of the efforts of the Rev. Devere Ponzo, a civil-rights leader. But even though West Chester was one of the first school districts in the state to honor Dr. King's birthday, Mr. Ponzo says the holiday has fallen short of what he envisioned. The district first honored Dr. King's birthday in 1969, 17 years before it was celebrated as a national holiday. For 31 years, West Chester schools have closed for Dr. King's birthday.
SPORTS
December 7, 1998 | By Ira Josephs, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The sport was ice hockey instead of football, the game was in the evening instead of the morning, and it was a season opener instead of a season finale. Everything, however, was right with Haverford School's world after it began its season with a 4-2 win over Episcopal Academy on Thanksgiving evening at the Skatium. "It's our version of the Turkey Bowl," Haverford coach Prescott Huidkoper said. "After Thanksgiving dinner we put a little gravy on our mashed potatoes. " Haverford School, which doesn't schedule games until the fall sports season is complete, usually plays on Thanksgiving evening.
NEWS
December 4, 1996 | By Anthony Beckman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Concerned that the school district's holiday music programs have veered too far from Christian tradition, June Cardosi, West Chester Area school board member, has asked the board to review all of this year's holiday performances. Cardosi said she has not attended a holiday program for many years but was contacted by several disappointed parents who felt the programs were "considerably watered down from what they used to be. " "I don't have any problem playing some Hanukkah music and some Christmas music," Cardosi said after Monday night's board meeting.
NEWS
November 23, 1996 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marie C. Beucler, 61, a retired high school teacher for the William Penn School District in Delaware County, died of heart failure Thursday at Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital in Camden. She was a lifelong resident of Merchantville, N.J. Miss Beucler taught English at the district's Pennwood High School in Lansdowne from its inception in 1982 until retiring in April. She also was the National Honor Society adviser there. She previously taught for 10 years at the former Yeadon Junior and Senior High School, Moorestown High School in Moorestown, N.J., and at Bok Vocational-Technical High School and Kensington High School, both in Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 13, 1996 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Camden City's Martin Luther King's Birthday activities have been postponed because of inclement weather and road conditions. "It would be hard for people to get here with the driving conditions," said Veronica Wynn, the city's executive assistant of community affairs. Speeches and presentations planned at City Hall will be rescheduled, weather permitting, for next week, she added. Festivities will go on as planned, however, at the New Jersey State Aquarium in Camden. A gospel choir, storytelling, and songs of freedom and struggle will highlight the presentation, which is to begin at noon Monday.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|