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School Lunch

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NEWS
August 26, 1990 | By Mary H. Donohue, Special to The Inquirer
Coatesville students will not have to pay more for their cafeteria lunches in September. The proposed rate increase for elementary, secondary and adult lunches in the Coatesville School District fell by the wayside Thursday, after two motions died from lack of approval by school board members. Board member Jean Irwin introduced the first motion for a price rise, which called for a 25-cent increase in district cafeteria lunch prices for elementary and secondary students and a 20-cent increase for adults.
FOOD
August 11, 2011 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
After the tables were properly set, the ice water was poured, and everyone was seated, the chef greeted guests and described the lunch prepared for them: Beef lasagna with homemade tomato sauce and grated Parmesan cheese; roasted red peppers with rosemary; green salad with creamy herb vinaigrette; and for dessert, lemon granita. The table captains, outfitted in white chef's jackets, were summoned to carry trays of food and serve it family style. Not exactly the setting or menu you might expect for an urban school cafeteria, but such was the scene at Girard College in North Philadelphia last week, where 260 city kids ages 6 to 17 were having lunch at a camp program.
NEWS
July 16, 1986
The Philadelphia School District has important responsibilities in the aftermath of a federal trial in which the jury found the Freshie Co. guilty of racketeering, mail fraud and obstruction of justice. The crimes took place eight years ago when bribes totaling more than $40,000 were paid to four school district employees to help Freshie get a $33 million school-lunch contract in 1978. Freshie has agreed to forfeit to the U.S. government $2 million in profits made from the contract.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
At least once a month comes deli day at Indian Mills School in Shamong, but last Wednesday's deli lunch featured something different: Less cholesterol, fat and salt. To the delight of eighth grader Adrienne Capps, lunch also included kiwi. "Oh my, they have kiwi," exclaimed Adrienne as she gazed over the lean meats, fresh vegetables and low-fat dip and the selection of nine different fruits, including her favorite, kiwi. Adrienne's friend, Aubrey Moyer, also gave the fruit bar a thumbs up, saying, "It's much better than usual.
NEWS
January 26, 2012 | By Mary Clare Jalonick, Associated Press
ALEXANDRIA, Va. - The first major nutritional overhaul of school meals in more than 15 years means most offerings - including the always popular pizza - will come with less sodium, more whole grains, and a wider selection of fruits and vegetables on the side. First lady Michelle Obama and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced the new guidelines during a visit Wednesday with elementary students. Michelle Obama, also joined by celebrity chef Rachael Ray, said youngsters would learn better if they don't have growling stomachs at school.
NEWS
March 1, 1992 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Eileen Walsh ironed the table linens. Jonathan Morgan pleated the napkins, fanning them upright across the plate. Carol Meliti stood ready to wait on the two tables of six. This was not the staff at a fancy French restaurant, but 12 students in the two-year sequential restaurant course at Haverford Senior High School who served a three-course lunch last month to 12 teachers and administrators. "It was five stars," said math teacher Judy Rice, holding up five fingers to evaluate the lunch, held every month during the school year.
NEWS
March 28, 1995 | By Ruth Shalit
When the House of Representatives voted on Feb. 23 to scrap the national school-lunch program in favor of block grants to states, liberals let out a howl of outrage. The Children's Defense Fund blitzed the Capitol with faxes denouncing the Republican "threat . . . to full and healthy development of our nation's children. " Democrats decried the move as an "assault on America's children," in the words of Vermont Sen. Patrick Leahy. President Clinton, for his part, stocked up on tacos and canned pears at a Virginia grade-school political stunt.
NEWS
April 10, 1986 | By VALERIA M. RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
A federal grand jury has charged the Freshie Co., its president, Anthony J. Pili, and three current or former Philadelphia School District executives with violating federal law in the bidding and awarding of school lunch contracts between 1978 and 1981. Freshie and Pili are charged with racketeering and mail fraud. Pili is also charged with obstruction of justice. The indictments, the first issued in a two-year investigation of the School District's food service contracts, were announced this afternoon by U.S. Attorney Edward S.G. Dennis Jr. The indictments also charged that Joseph R. Nagy, the School District's food service director, and former district officials Anthony J. D'Alonzo and Howard Cain had accepted bribes totaling more than $75,000 from the Freshie Co. and two other food vendors in exchange for "aiding and assisting" the companies in winning district bids, covering up overcharges and maximizing profits.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | By Barbara Evans Sorid, Special to The Inquirer
The cost of a school lunch will be taking a bigger bite out of the family budget in several Burlington County school districts when schools re-open this week. Increases in operating costs coupled with government cutbacks in food commodities have forced such school districts as Medford, Moorestown, Mount Holly, Evesham and Springfield to boost their prices. Medford's school board voted at its Aug. 13 meeting to increase lunch prices for its 2,500 students from $1.00 to $1.25.
NEWS
January 28, 2003 | By Jane Eisner
I'll admit it: I'm unusual when it comes to food. I like to eat things that are green and red and yellow and purple, the crunchier the better. I enjoy weird stuff like kale and quinoa and, when prepared correctly, even brussels sprouts. I haven't eaten in a McDonald's in years. Don't paint me as an obsessive purist; I'm not. Anyone who knows me knows my seasonal weakness for candy corn, my occasional indulgence in french fries, and my continuing infatuation with chocolate. But generally, I don't do brown.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 5, 2014
BANANA DOG BITES These sweet, sushi-style snacks pack a protein punch. Use whole-wheat tortillas for extra fiber. 2 tortillas (any variety will work) 1/4 cup peanut butter, or almond or sunflower butter 2 bananas, peeled Place one tortilla on a flat surface and spread 2 tablespoons of peanut butter on the tortilla to coat it evenly. (Note: If your tortillas are stiff, you can put them in the microwave between 2 pieces of moist paper towel and heat for 15 to 20 seconds to soften.)
NEWS
June 18, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
First, the nation agreed that its children are too heavy and unhealthy. Then, the federal government - Democrats and Republicans together channeling scientific research - hammered out ideas to reduce fat, calories, and salt in school meals. Now, that harmonious effort is splintering as a food fight embroiling Congress, health professionals, the White House, and even cafeteria workers threatens to rage through the summer and disrupt lunch period come September. In an odd twist, the School Nutrition Association (SNA)
NEWS
June 14, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A statewide effort to get more students to eat breakfast is yielding surprisingly positive results. In a recent contest, Philadelphia's Feltonville School of Arts and Sciences, a middle school, beat out 900 other Pennsylvania schools in the so-called School Breakfast Challenge. The school on East Courtland Street in North Philadelphia achieved the largest increase in breakfast participation in the state, improving from 29 percent of students in October 2013 to an average of 77 percent during January through March of this year.
FOOD
September 6, 2013 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
School lunch . The words evoke mental images of water-bloated frozen pizza, sugary fruit-flavored beverages, irradiated meat slabs, and plastic-wrapped lunch "kits. " For most parents, the prospect is downright horrifying, and perhaps especially so when said parents are culinary professionals. It's not just the gastronomic atrocities involved but the industrial-grade ingredients that give chefs pause. "When I think of my son eating lunch at school, I have a lot of concerns about where the food comes from and who's making it," says Joe Cicala of Le Virtu in South Philly.
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | By Rama Lakshmi, Washington Post
NEW DELHI - Police on Wednesday arrested the principal of the school in eastern India where 23 children died last week after eating a free lunch contaminated with pesticides. Meena Kumari had fled soon after the children fell ill July 16 at their rural school in Bihar state. On Wednesday, members of a special investigative team detained her as she was going to a local court in the town of Chapra to file an application for bail in anticipation of an arrest. Investigators have said that Kumari bought ingredients for the school lunch from her husband's grocery.
NEWS
July 21, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 11:15 on a Monday morning, four children under age 8 quietly walked up to Andrea Cooper-Chamberlain's house in Darby Borough to eat. An unpaid neighborhood do-gooder, Cooper-Chamberlain distributes free lunch every day at noon during the summer, when school lunches are unavailable. "I can't serve till 12, sweetheart," she told the oldest boy, who displayed the unmistakable demeanor of a hungry child: expectant, quiet, attentive. He wordlessly turned and led the others away.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - An investigation into 15 New Jersey school districts turned up more than 100 public employees and family members who lied about their incomes to get free school lunches for their children, according to the state comptroller. Their applications bolstered district enrollment figures in the federal free lunch program - a factor that allows school districts to receive more state aid. Designed to help low-income families, the federal program "has been compromised by widespread fraud," Comptroller Matthew Boxer said Wednesday, announcing the investigation results during a news conference at his office.
NEWS
April 20, 2013 | By Patrick Kerkstra
The room goes quiet as chef Quintel Coles walks out from the kitchen to tell his customers what's for lunch. Today, he tells them, they will be dining on a primavera pasta with a sauce made of roasted and pureed sweet potatoes. The shaved vegetable salad is dressed in a strawberry-infused balsamic vinaigrette. And to drink? Nonfat milk (or water). As always. This is the lunch menu on an average Friday at Cristo Rey High School in North Philadelphia, one of five regional Catholic schools that has adopted an entirely new approach to school lunch called Eatiquette, pioneered by famed chef and restaurateur Marc Vetri and his Vetri Foundation for Children.
NEWS
January 26, 2012 | By Mary Clare Jalonick, Associated Press
ALEXANDRIA, Va. - The first major nutritional overhaul of school meals in more than 15 years means most offerings - including the always popular pizza - will come with less sodium, more whole grains, and a wider selection of fruits and vegetables on the side. First lady Michelle Obama and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced the new guidelines during a visit Wednesday with elementary students. Michelle Obama, also joined by celebrity chef Rachael Ray, said youngsters would learn better if they don't have growling stomachs at school.
NEWS
November 23, 2011
Congress was wrong to block new rules proposed by the Agriculture Department that would have overhauled the nation's school lunch program. In a fight that had more do with adults and big business than the best interest of children, lawmakers sided with the frozen-food industry and potato growers. An agriculture spending bill approved last week with bipartisan support rejected tougher guidelines for school lunch and breakfast programs. The proposed changes would have been the first in 15 years to the $11 billion lunch program and fell in line with President Obama's effort to end childhood hunger by 2015.
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