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NEWS
May 31, 2014
It is of little comfort to know that a school's lack of a staff nurse played no apparent role in the death of a first grader last week. A child's death is always tragic, and as Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. said, "During times of tragedy, our community should not have to question whether an extra staff member or a program would have made a difference. " The seven-year-old Jackson Elementary School student had a congenital heart defect, which can lead to sudden death, medical examiners said.
NEWS
May 14, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gertrude F. Tierney Lavery, 79, of Cherry Hill, a longtime nurse at Cinnaminson High School known for her outgoing and take-charge attitude, died of liver cancer Wednesday, May 12, at Fox Chase Cancer Center. Though Mrs. Lavery's title was registered nurse, she took various other roles at the school: counselor, teacher, even emergency driver. "She was extremely accommodating to kids and went beyond what was expected of her," said teacher Al Sloan, who worked at the school all 26 years Mrs. Lavery was the nurse.
NEWS
December 27, 1990 | By Patrick Scott, Special to The Inquirer
A school nurse has sued the Wallingford-Swarthmore School District, contending that she was illegally assigned to homeroom and other duties in addition to her nursing job. According to the suit, Bonnie Spangler of Wayne, a nurse in the school district for the last six years, has been assigned to "morning duty" this school year and last in violation of the state Public School Code. Her morning duty involved monitoring the cafeteria at the Swarthmore-Rutledge Elementary School, where pupils await the start of the school day. Spangler's suit, filed Dec. 6, does not seek damages.
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Rebecca Ellen Jones Alderfer, 79, of Hartsville in Bucks County, a retired school nurse known for her compassionate nature, died of lung cancer Sunday in Abington Memorial Hospital. After practicing nursing at the Abington hospital for several years in the 1940s, she earned a bachelor's degree in education from what was then West Chester State Teachers College and became a school nurse. "Thousands of schoolchildren felt her loving touch during her 20 years as a school nurse for the Central Bucks School District," said a son, David Alderfer.
NEWS
July 16, 1995 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Anna C. Heller, 88, a school nurse who gave three decades of service to Mount Holly schools, students and families, died Tuesday at the New Jersey Veterans Memorial Home in Vineland, where she lived. A 1926 graduate of the former Mount Holly High School, Mrs. Heller received her nursing degree from the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing in Philadelphia, and her school nursing permit from Trenton State College in 1935. She received a bachelor's degree in education from Rutgers University in 1947.
NEWS
November 18, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jacqueline Rich Sauro, 79, of Moorestown, a longtime nurse at Cherry Hill High School East whose easygoing personality made her a favorite chaperone for class trips, died of lung cancer Friday, Nov. 12, at her home. Mrs. Sauro took her school nurse's job "to an entirely different level," said former Cherry Hill East principal James Gallagher, now the district's assistant superintendent. "She was a surrogate mother to a lot of the kids," he said. Students were often in her office seeking advice on more than just health, he said.
NEWS
July 15, 1996 | By Susan Q. Stranahan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 22 1/2 years, youngsters in the Norristown school system might just as well have had their mother in the school nurse's office. Until she retired in 1984, Jessie Woessner was in charge. And in addition to dispensing Band-Aids and throat lozenges, she took an active interest in their overall well-being, according to her daughter. "She cared for them as if they were her own," said Jessie Ann Moser of Allentown. Mrs. Woessner, who lived in East Norriton Township, died Friday at her home.
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Aletta M. Crichton, 86, Pemberton Township's first school nurse and a strong advocate for the creation of special-education classes in the district, died last Friday at the Health Care Center at Cadbury, Cherry Hill. Mrs. Crichton retired in 1973, and in 1978, the school district paid tribute to her long service and dedication to students by naming a Browns Mills school - the Aletta M. Crichton School - in her honor. A Cherry Hill resident, Mrs. Crichton was a registered nurse who joined the Pemberton Township School District in 1950, serving all eight schools.
NEWS
December 29, 2011 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Ann Sewell doesn't just dispense aspirin and Band-Aids. Sewell, the school nurse at Bok High in South Philadelphia, tends to 187 asthmatic teenagers. She treats insulin-dependent diabetics, kids with cystic fibrosis, sickle-cell anemia, and seizure disorders. As part of its latest round of budget cuts, the Philadelphia School District will lay off 141 employees, including 47 nurses, effective Saturday. Sewell and about 50 others gathered at district headquarters Wednesday to protest.
NEWS
December 18, 1995 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Marion Johnson Heitman, 80, a retired school nurse and former resident of Willow Grove and Horsham, died Wednesday at her home in Langhorne. Mrs. Heitman was born in Abington and graduated from Abington High School in 1933. She graduated from Abington Memorial Hospital's School of Nursing in 1938 and in 1963 earned a degree from what is now West Chester University. She resided for many years in Willow Grove and in Horsham before moving to Langhorne three years ago. In 1975, Mrs. Heitman retired after 18 years as a nurse for the Upper Moreland School District.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lorraine E. Piccone, 79, a nurse and resident of Upper Darby and later, Broomall, died Friday, July 18, of septic shock at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital. Work and family were top priorities for Mrs. Piccone, whose maiden name was Shelzi. A talented and dedicated nurse, she graduated from Notre Dame Academy in Moylan and pursued her nursing studies and training at Pennsylvania Hospital Nursing School. She spent many years administering long-term care at Little Flower Manor and St. Francis Country House, Catholic nursing facilities in Darby Borough.
NEWS
July 13, 2014 | By Lydia O'Neal, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an attempt to bridge the divide between teachers and lawmakers, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan posed questions to a group of educators in Center City on Friday while a few protesters gathered outside. Duncan, speaking before more than 120 members of the National Network of State Teachers of the Year at their conference at the Hilton DoubleTree Hotel, first addressed the city's education budget crisis. "First of all, I want to say one quick thing about the budget issues here in Philadelphia," he said.
NEWS
July 1, 2014 | STATE REP. BRIAN SIMS
  OVER THE PAST year and a half, I have walked the halls of Philadelphia schools and spoken with students of all ages. I have met with parents in community centers, cafeterias and gymnasiums to hear their worries and frustrations. I have heard from teachers who, day in and day out, go to work unsure if they will have enough paper for their students or worried that a child will have a medical emergency on a day when there is no school nurse available. For the past several years, we have found ourselves facing an unacceptable lack of state funding for schools.
NEWS
June 12, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
An entire first-grade class was bused to the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia for monitoring Tuesday after a 6-year-old was spotted with packets that police said likely contained heroin. The incident happened when a teacher at John Barry Elementary at 59th and Race Streets in West Philadelphia noticed one of her students playing with small plastic packets she had brought to school. The teacher asked the girl to drop what was in her hands, then evacuated the classroom and called police and paramedics.
NEWS
May 31, 2014
It is of little comfort to know that a school's lack of a staff nurse played no apparent role in the death of a first grader last week. A child's death is always tragic, and as Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. said, "During times of tragedy, our community should not have to question whether an extra staff member or a program would have made a difference. " The seven-year-old Jackson Elementary School student had a congenital heart defect, which can lead to sudden death, medical examiners said.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
School nurse Tina Kemps loves her students. Even when it hurts. "I've been smacked, I've been hit," she laughs. "That's nothing. " What really matters is not the occasional incident, she says, but that the students regularly "come in here and feel very loved and very safe. " "Here" is Kemps' never-a-dull-moment office at Durand Academy, a special-needs school that often takes students others can't handle. "Many of our parents have tried everything," says Kemps, 61, who once planned to be retired by now. "I wouldn't do this if I didn't love it. " A striking woman with a distinctive personal style and a wry wit, Kemps worked as a runway model for 25 years, appeared in print advertisements, and continues to act occasionally.
NEWS
May 29, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Across the country, full-time school nurses are often early victims of budget cuts, sacrificed to make ends meet in strapped school systems like Philadelphia's. But having nurses can save money, according to a new study published in the Journal of American Medicine Association Pediatrics. Every dollar spent on nursing services, the authors concluded, saves $2.20 in medical costs and lost productivity from teachers and parents. "I quite frankly don't understand how a school can function without a school nurse," Anne Sheetz, senior author of the study, said Tuesday.
NEWS
May 24, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
Perhaps it will never be clear to Melissa Wilde whether a 7-year-old boy who died this week after falling ill at a South Philadelphia school would have lived had a full-time nurse been present. But the question still haunts Wilde, a Jackson Elementary School parent. "Who will be there next time?" she asked Thursday. "What if this school had a full-time nurse? What if this school had a full-time counselor? Could they save the next child's life?" The first grader, whose name is not being released, died Wednesday afternoon at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia after becoming sick at Jackson, where a school nurse works only on Thursdays and every other Friday.
NEWS
May 23, 2014
THE DEATH of any child is a tragedy. The death of two children who fell ill while at school is unspeakable. And while the cause of death for a first-grader at Andrew Jackson School has not been determined, both cases demand that we take a hard look at the impact the district's budget realities may be having on children. When the Jackson student died Wednesday, there was no school nurse on duty. Nor was there a school nurse on duty in October when a sixth-grader had an asthma attack and subsequently died.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO & SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writers leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
EVERY TIME Marcella Burney gets a call from Andrew Jackson Elementary School, she panics. That's because three of her children attend Jackson, on 12th Street near Federal in South Philadelphia, including a son who has asthma and a daughter who carries an epinephrine injector because of severe allergies. "It can be dangerous for kids out on the street, and now we got to worry about our kids in the school, too?" Burney said. "This is very dangerous. It scares me every time I have to leave my kids here.
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