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School Song

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NEWS
June 16, 1997 | By Chris Seper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
McDonald School, McDonald School, It's where we learn the Golden Rule. What did you do when you left elementary school? Slip your favorite teachers a card and a hug, thanking them for being nice? Maybe a little celebration in front of the steps, happy to be "growing up" and moving on to middle school? Can you even remember that far back? It's a safe bet that McDonald Elementary student Heather Siegfried will remember her school for quite a while - and vice versa.
NEWS
May 21, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
DOZENS OF Central High School students and alums lined the entrance to their school and the front hallway inside, wearing their school colors proudly and wildly waving their arms. "277! 277!" they cheered last Thursday, high-fiving members of the incoming class as they entered the school. This was no pep rally in the traditional sense, but the annual Central High School freshman orientation for September's incoming class, known in these parts as 277. "It was really lively and felt like a homecoming," said Nathan Zeyl, 14, referring to the students' welcome.
NEWS
August 29, 1998 | By Lisa Shafer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Adele Pollock Kaplan, 81, a charity worker, champion bridge player and writer of her high school song, died of congestive heart failure Thursday at Abington Memorial Hospital. She had resided in Elkins Park for more than 35 years. A native of Philadelphia, Mrs. Kaplan graduated as valedictorian from Simon Gratz High School, where she wrote the school song. She attended Temple University on scholarship and studied piano at the Philadelphia Conservatory of Music. For decades, she wrote newsletter articles for the Ashbourne Country Club in Cheltenham, poems for friends on special occasions, and letters to pen pals and celebrities around the world.
NEWS
April 27, 1987 | By Linda Lally, Special to The Inquirer
Oscar Eiermann, 79, of Woodbury, a professional classical pianist, died Friday at his home. He began playing the piano and the organ at the age of 8 and graduated from the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia in 1939. For five years, he was a concert pianist and played at Carnegie Hall in New York several times. He also made musical tours of the United States, Canada and Mexico. He accompanied well-known singers on their tours, played on several radio programs and on the Philco Show, a weekly half-hour television program.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | By Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
It's just a stained, raggedy, weatherbeaten white sweatshirt. Two discolored stripes around the right sleeve. A well frayed collar. Splotches of paint down the front. It doesn't matter. It's still the first one off the hook just about every weekend. Like a baby's security blanket, it's always there. Like that blanket, the shirt is also very special. What makes it special is the four faded blue letters across the front. WEST, it reads. One time, when the letters were bright and new, a man, wearing his West shirt, was taking a sunset walk on a South Jersey beach.
NEWS
April 16, 1986 | By Doreen Carvajal, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the help of two well-dressed schoolboys, a frail 91-year-old Moorestown woman scratched the soil with a gleaming silver spade last week to help make way for the Moorestown Friends School's new $1 million hall. "Oooommmmph," said Lydia B. Stokes as she cleared a small square with the help of two Moorestown students, David Jefferds and Michael Brenner. And the deed was done. Soon other hands will be digging in the same spot, which is the future site of Stokes Hall. The hall will link the upper and lower buildings of the campus and will house two science laboratories, administrative offices, a faculty center and a library.
NEWS
January 27, 1992 | By Peter Landry, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Enos S. Andrews, 88, an educator whose philosophy of dedication and perseverance made him an institution at Reynolds Elementary School, died Friday in a Mount Airy nursing home. "He would tell his students, 'Start where you are and with what you have and make something of it!' " said his daughter, Gertrude A. Baker, who followed her father into a career in education. "And in 44 years working in the public schools, he was never late and never absent," she said. For more than 40 years, Mr. Andrews was a fixture at Reynolds Elementary, first as a science teacher and, for the last decade of his career, as an administrative assistant.
NEWS
December 16, 1992 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writers Yvonne Latty, Scott Flander and Kurt Heine also contributed to this report
The Goretti Girls of South Philly went ga-ga. The guys at Neumann were smiling like saints. The Little Flower girls in Hunting Park blossomed. And so it went, from West Catholic to Northeast - the city's Catholic high schools were spared the fiscal ax of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. None will close, none will even merge. It was "a glorious moment," said the principal at St. Maria Goretti High School for Girls, which won't be merged with St. John Neumann, as had been proposed.
NEWS
May 28, 2003 | By Renate Schonwetter Elgart
"Olney High - Live on forever. " As the last words of our school song echoed in the room, we began joyfully saying our goodbyes. Another high school reunion had passed; we had celebrated our 50th anniversary. Young and hopeful, we graduated from Olney in 1953, the year Dwight Eisenhower became president, Dumont was still a TV channel, and Philadelphia boasted both the Phillies and the Athletics baseball teams. We were 423 graduates that January 22. Five decades later, 20 had been lost to places unknown and 43 had died; we mourn them.
NEWS
March 23, 2000 | By Stacey Belinda Bleistein
With only seconds left on the overtime clock, our pep band director called out a school song for us to play for the fans. Reluctantly, we stood, sullen with the loss facing us. I picked up my saxophone and we started to play to the stands. That's when I smiled. Before us, section upon section of Temple basketball fans, wearing cherry and white, all on their feet, singing their hearts out to the Temple fight song. That is what sportsmanship is all about. Temple University was represented wonderfully in Buffalo by fans who stand by their team, especially in a game like Sunday's playoff loss to Seton Hall.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 21, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
DOZENS OF Central High School students and alums lined the entrance to their school and the front hallway inside, wearing their school colors proudly and wildly waving their arms. "277! 277!" they cheered last Thursday, high-fiving members of the incoming class as they entered the school. This was no pep rally in the traditional sense, but the annual Central High School freshman orientation for September's incoming class, known in these parts as 277. "It was really lively and felt like a homecoming," said Nathan Zeyl, 14, referring to the students' welcome.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JEFF HORN got an early look at the man Tersh Wallace would become. Jeff was 8 at the time, a new kid in a West Philadelphia neighborhood and feeling kind of lonely. One day, Jeff was bouncing a ball against a wall, and this big kid came along on a bicycle. "He immediately rode over to me and introduced himself," Jeff said. "A few minutes later, we were taking turns throwing the ball and riding his bike. "That's the kind of kid Tersh was then and would remain for the rest of his life.
NEWS
January 15, 2012 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing 1,000 strong on Torresdale Avenue, the students, alumnae and supporters of St. Hubert Catholic High School for Girls said Friday that they would raise hundreds of thousands of dollars in two weeks for a chance to save their school. The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced two weeks ago that it would close St. Hubert and three other high schools because of declining enrollment. It also plans to close 45 elementary schools. Kathryn Ott Lovell, a member of the alumnae association advisory board, said the association had been under the impression it had to hand over a cash deposit of $1.2 million before the archdiocese would hear an appeal of its decision to close the 70-year-old institution, which the archdiocese later denied.
NEWS
April 3, 2011
Stacy Schwab is a fifth-grade teacher at the John Hancock Demonstration School in Northeast Philadelphia On a recent morning, as the second bell rang promptly at 8:28, I walked out the door into a schoolyard full of about 500 kindergarten through fifth-grade students, all socializing quietly in lines. My eyes were immediately drawn to the spot where the sun was shining on a small group of first graders standing near the flag waiting to lead the student body in the Pledge of Allegiance.
NEWS
May 28, 2003 | By Renate Schonwetter Elgart
"Olney High - Live on forever. " As the last words of our school song echoed in the room, we began joyfully saying our goodbyes. Another high school reunion had passed; we had celebrated our 50th anniversary. Young and hopeful, we graduated from Olney in 1953, the year Dwight Eisenhower became president, Dumont was still a TV channel, and Philadelphia boasted both the Phillies and the Athletics baseball teams. We were 423 graduates that January 22. Five decades later, 20 had been lost to places unknown and 43 had died; we mourn them.
NEWS
March 23, 2000 | By Stacey Belinda Bleistein
With only seconds left on the overtime clock, our pep band director called out a school song for us to play for the fans. Reluctantly, we stood, sullen with the loss facing us. I picked up my saxophone and we started to play to the stands. That's when I smiled. Before us, section upon section of Temple basketball fans, wearing cherry and white, all on their feet, singing their hearts out to the Temple fight song. That is what sportsmanship is all about. Temple University was represented wonderfully in Buffalo by fans who stand by their team, especially in a game like Sunday's playoff loss to Seton Hall.
SPORTS
October 5, 1998 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Never admit to feeling pain. Through game after game while serving as the starting quarterback for the "Football Team That Just Couldn't Win," B.J. Reiprich managed to cope by maintaining that stance. When his fellow students at Conwell-Egan High spit out nasty remarks, Reiprich pretended not to hear. When they laughed, he convinced himself someone must have cracked a good joke. "It was frustrating," said Reiprich, a 5-10, 185-pound senior, "but I never let it affect me. I went out to play every game the same way. " One good thing - probably the only good thing - about a long losing streak is that a time finally comes when the past tense fits.
NEWS
August 29, 1998 | By Lisa Shafer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Adele Pollock Kaplan, 81, a charity worker, champion bridge player and writer of her high school song, died of congestive heart failure Thursday at Abington Memorial Hospital. She had resided in Elkins Park for more than 35 years. A native of Philadelphia, Mrs. Kaplan graduated as valedictorian from Simon Gratz High School, where she wrote the school song. She attended Temple University on scholarship and studied piano at the Philadelphia Conservatory of Music. For decades, she wrote newsletter articles for the Ashbourne Country Club in Cheltenham, poems for friends on special occasions, and letters to pen pals and celebrities around the world.
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