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School Spirit

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NEWS
June 5, 1988 | By Bridgett M. Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Steven Meyer's class at Cheltenham High School never was known for its school spirit. Its image wasn't helped much when, midway through the outdoor graduation ceremonies, it started to rain. Diplomas had to be given to students in their homerooms. And when the class gave its homecoming dance, the band never showed up, Meyer said. In what might have been a symbolic move, Meyer, 27, traded in his high school class ring for a college ring when he graduated from Temple University.
NEWS
May 9, 1993 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If two of the cashiers working the registers at the Kennett Square McDonald's tomorrow night look a little familiar to elementary school children from the Kennett school district, there's good reason. Andrew Augustine, principal of Mary D. Lang Elementary School and Barbara DeCarlo, principal of New Garden Elementary will be working the registers between 5 and 7 p.m. with more than ringing up Big Macs on their minds. Darlene Faulkner, an employee of the store, said the principal with the most money in his or her cash register at the end of the two hours will take the contents back to school to spend anyway they want.
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | By Susan Levine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Something very nice happened in the village of Craftsbury Common on Friday night, in a too-small high school gymnasium worn smooth by a half-century of students. The school threw a graduation party. And everybody came. Well, maybe not everybody, but it sure looked that way. Eighteen chairs had been set up in each row, with the rows going back 17 deep, and by the time Jessica Breitmeyer started down the center aisle to the first chords of "Pomp and Circumstance," every seat was taken.
NEWS
April 12, 1992 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
School spirit has become an issue at Henderson High School in West Chester. Having experienced minor cases of vandalism ranging from stink bombs being set off in the school's halls to phony bomb scares resulting in evacuations, some students have said, "Enough. " Amie Keiser, a senior and the school's representative to the school board meetings, said members of the student senate and officers from each class had been meeting to come up with ideas to promote school spirit among the school's 1,400 students.
SPORTS
January 8, 2012 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mainland Regional has the best school spirit in the nation. At least, that's according to Under Armour, the athletic apparel company that is based in Baltimore. Mainland, which was devastated in August by the death of four football players in an automobile accident, was named the winner of Under Armour's "Finding Undeniable" contest on Thursday night. "It was an unreal experience," said Mainland athletic director Mike Gately, who was on the field for the announcement at halftime of the Under Armour All-American football game Thursday night in the Tropicana Dome in St. Petersburg, Fla. As the winner of the first-year contest that challenged schools around the country to show their spirit - through cheers, band performances, and mascot challenges as well as generating online votes - Mainland will receive $182,000 worth of athletic apparel from Under Armour over a two-year period.
NEWS
November 26, 1989 | By Michael Simon, Special to The Inquirer
Forced to forgo most of their fall sports program because of the recent teachers strike, Garnet Valley High School students refused to pine and mope. They threw a parade instead. The parade on Nov. 19 was actually both a celebration of the teachers' court-ordered return to classrooms and a belated homecoming parade. The procession of cheerleaders, band members, floats from each grade and homecoming-court candidates was suggested by principal Richard Casterfero and parent Cathy Wilkerson.
NEWS
March 24, 1986 | By Paul Scicchitano, Special to The Inquirer
Debbie Venezia of Conshohocken was leading her high school cheerleading squad in a practice routine before Saturday's competition when she noticed that the squad's performance seemed a bit wooden. "Real stiff," Venezia, 17, said, chiding the 13-member team. "You girls have really got to smile more. " Her advice must have worked, for when the members of the Archbishop Kennedy squad took the gym floor at Pennsylvania State University's Ogontz Campus in Abington, they came out smiling and had enough energy to power a steamship.
NEWS
October 19, 1987 | By TYREE JOHNSON, Daily News Staff Writer
All around the sprawling campus of Cheyney University, students and teachers were busy preparing for homecoming. Inside the student activities building, young men and women hung campaign posters around their necks soliciting votes that would make them king and queen for the homecoming weekend. And Franklin Kinder, the school's director of alumni relations, was putting the finishing touches to plans that drew thousands of alumni and students to the university's football game, various class reunions and "the big party in the city" over the weekend.
NEWS
March 7, 2002
The United States will need more than 5,000 new schools by 2008 to accommodate enrollment burgeoning toward 54.3 million. Public school districts all over the country are searching for sites, commissioning designs, and begging taxpayers to pass bonds. New Jersey districts are aided by the most ambitious school-building initiative in the nation - an $8.5 billion state bond floated in 2000. Local building decisions these days are complicated by required access for the disabled; 21st-century technology and security needs, and land-gobbling state space guidelines.
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SPORTS
January 11, 2016 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
My discovery of the galvanizing power of school spirit came courtesy of Gloucester Catholic's Dribble Nuts in the late 1960s. Looking back, it's remarkable that group existed: a bunch of upperclassmen boys, mostly football players, who would dribble a basketball, Olympic Torch-relay style, to state tournament games. They would wear gray sweatshirts in the late-afternoon twilight and dribble a rubber basketball - as only football players can dribble a rubber basketball on asphalt - along the side of busy streets on their way to events as far away as Princeton and Perth Amboy.
NEWS
September 7, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
There was no mistaking the victor in North Philadelphia on Saturday night. Swarms of cherry-red-clad Temple University students and fans returned to their campus howling in celebration after the Owls defeated Penn State, 27-10, for the first time since 1941. They whipped T-shirts and flags in the air, banged on the side of cars and buses. Chants of "T for Temple U. . . " - others were unprintable - and screams of "Temple Proud!" that began at Lincoln Financial Field reverberated along North Broad Street on Saturday night as students exited subway trains and arrived on buses.
NEWS
August 24, 2015
SCHOOL spirit has a whole different meaning for Monica Ten-Kate, who's working her way through Penn State, delivering one message from the dearly departed at a time. This week, the 21-year-old communications major from northern Virginia begins starring in "Monica the Medium" (8 p.m. Tuesday, ABC Family), a docu-series that follows her around Happy Valley as she juggles school with a calling that doesn't always mesh with her class schedule. She spoke with Ellen Gray about discovering what she believes to be her gift, her mother's fears and how strangers react when she approaches them with a "message" from a loved one. Have you always been a medium?
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
There's a pervasive pessimism in Philadelphia that too often sours the city's progress. It's a defeatist culture most evident among sports fans who fear their enthusiasm for the Phillies, Eagles, or Flyers will always be disappointed. But it also dampens support for critical needs - like better education for children. The right mayor can change that. He or she must be able to make Philadelphians believe that their schools can be great. That task is too big for a superintendent. It requires the heavy lifting of a mayor to persuade a city to move beyond scraping together just enough cash to fill the School District's annual budget gaps.
NEWS
September 6, 2014
ISSUE | ARTS FUNDING Board members, bring on the bucks Perhaps it takes an outsider like Michael Kaiser to finally tell the truth to Philadelphia's philanthropic community ("Seeing a way to the future," Aug. 29). The fault is not in the audience or the critics or the stars. It is in constrained budgets that hamper artistic creativity, the lack of endowment funding, and the failure to cultivate individual donors. Indeed, in the interview, Kaiser calls out ineffective boards of directors and enumerates precisely the problems that have kept many of Philadelphia's distinguished arts institutions teetering on the edge of insolvency.
NEWS
February 16, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON TWP. Wednesday afternoon, there was a pep rally at Washington Township High School. Principal Joseph Bollendorf led the charge. More than 250 students were on hand. Buttons with slogans were handed out. Gift cards were won. But this rally wasn't for one of the school's athletic teams. It wasn't even about school spirit per se. The students in the audience were all taking Advanced Placement courses, and the rally was meant to get out information about the school's AP program and to get more students to take AP exams at the end of their courses.
NEWS
March 29, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anna Allen, assistant dean of students at La Salle University, doesn't understand why enrollment goes up when a school's basketball team is successful. "It's weird," she said. "But it's true. And we're going to capitalize on it. " Prospective students are receiving video links showing behind-the-scenes footage of the players and their coach from this season's underdog NCAA tournament run. The camaraderie. The inspirational pep talks. The sweat. The thrills. The awesome musculature.
SPORTS
March 28, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anna Allen, assistant dean of students at La Salle University, doesn't understand why enrollment goes up when a school's basketball team is successful. "It's weird," she said. "But it's true. And we're going to capitalize on it. " Prospective students are receiving video links showing behind-the-scenes footage of the players and their coach from this season's underdog NCAA tournament run. The camaraderie. The inspirational pep talks. The sweat. The thrills. The awesome musculature.
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer
THERE WAS A TIME, not too long ago, when South Philadelphia's Andrew Jackson Elementary School had a reputation for being unsafe, violent even. "It was depressing as all get- out," said parent Marina Stamos, who lives near the school, on 12th Street near Federal. She described the three-story building as "dark, yucky, prison-looking. " Now tile murals decorate portions of the nearly 90-year-old structure. The front gardens are spruced up. Parts of the school's exterior were given a fresh coat of paint in 2010.
NEWS
January 11, 2012 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
There is life after the death of a Catholic school, Michael Ritz wants students and parents to know, a spiritual resurrection. Two decades ago, the archdiocese announced the closing of Ritz's beloved St. James Catholic High in Chester. Prayers, tears, and protests followed, the same emotional turmoil now experienced by the communities of 49 institutions slated for elimination. St. James closed anyway. June 1993, as if the alumni could forget. Assistant principal John Mooney, Class of 1950, St. James English teacher of 39 years, athletic director, coach of three sports (six Catholic League and two city baseball championships)
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