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School Violence

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NEWS
August 22, 1999 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A recently released state report paints the Philadelphia School District as having a far lower rate of violence in its schools than Pittsburgh has in its. But don't be too quick to draw any conclusions. Philadelphia - which, like other districts, supplies the state with the data - doesn't count student fights as incidents of violence. Pittsburgh does. So do a lot of other schools. As a result, some of the report's statistics are distorted and it's difficult, if not impossible, to compare one district to another or one county to another.
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Hundreds of teachers, administrators and law-enforcement officers from throughout Pennsylvania attending a two-day conference on school violence yesterday were jolted by the deadly shooting that had taken place in California the day before. Hypothetical scenarios gave way to grave reality as speakers addressing the annual meeting of the state's Safe Schools Initiative Grantees rewrote their presentations to address the latest tragedy. What happened at Santana High School outside San Diego was a grim reminder that violence can happen anywhere, state school officials said.
NEWS
July 28, 2000 | By Saba Bireda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Imagine a typical summer as a high school student. You probably conjure up visions of time spent lying by the pool, working to save money, or just lounging at home watching television. Do you think of a summer spent tracking how diseases affect different socioeconomic groups? Can you see putting off hanging out with friends to draw plans for a hotel in your neighborhood? Or, how about giving up sleeping late in order to research school-violence prevention plans? This summer, more than 100 North Philadelphia high school students have embarked on a yearlong project researching community issues as part of the Temple University Young Scholars Program.
NEWS
April 17, 2012 | BY MIKE ARMSTRONG, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Inquirer's investigation of the climate of pervasive violence in Philadelphia's public schools on Monday won the Pulitzer Prize for public service, the profession's most prestigious honor. The award is the 19th Pulitzer Prize for the 183-year-old newspaper and its first since 1997. The seven-part series, "Assault on Learning," revealed that violence in city schools was widespread and underreported, with 30,000 serious incidents over the last five school years. Those findings were later corroborated by a Philadelphia School District panel on safety, spurred an overhaul of incident reporting in the district, and prompted hiring of a state-funded safe-schools advocate.
NEWS
February 6, 2012
By Masai Skief Parents often tell me school safety is a key factor in their search for a new school for their children. Violence in Philadelphia schools has created a culture of fear for many students, forcing families to explore alternatives such as charter and private schools. A recent blue-ribbon commission report in response to this trend offered recommendations to reduce violence, including building better relationships between adults and students and creating a reporting system to hold schools accountable for safety.
NEWS
March 29, 2007
RE THE complaints about school police being too violent and about the students who walked out of classes to protest this: These kids have to be kidding. I'm not only a parent of a child in high school, but I also work at the school. My child is no angel, and I was there so many times they offered me a job. When I heard about the teacher at Germantown High who got his neck broken because he confiscated a student's contraband iPod, I asked myself, where are the parents of these students?
NEWS
July 23, 2004
RE: YOUR editorial on the urgency needed to address violence in our schools, we would like to applaud the efforts of Philadelphia School District CEO Paul Vallas, along with recognizing the hard work and efforts of Safe Schools Advocate Harvey Rice. Through the state House of Representatives' Urban Affairs Committee, we conducted a three-year investigation into violence in Philadelphia public schools. Our bipartisan investigation uncovered a troubling level of unbridled violence and disruptive behavior, combined with a concerted attempt by the previous administration to under-report the number of violent incidents - hoping the problem would just go away.
NEWS
January 21, 2000 | By Michael Sandler, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
School violence continues to be a tempestuous issue in Chester County communities. These days, when a student threatens harm to people or property, school administrators are likely to dial police departments to ask for assistance. The Community Violence Prevention Network would like to identify potential problems before those problems occur. The nonprofit program plans to hold its second School Summit today at the Intermediate Unit in Exton. "We are hoping it will raise awareness that at-risk youths are vulnerable to hate groups in terms of recruitment and as far as being targets," said Christine Grantham, the network's program director.
NEWS
February 24, 2003
ELMER SMITH'S recent column ("Audenried Community Failing Its Own School," Feb. 12) painted an unfortunate picture of a school with more issues than just a principal who showed inadequate management in his school. Violence of this nature, with six students (five girls and a boy) cut by a sharp object resulting in three arrests, should not be tolerable in any school setting, much less in society. Seeing how one of the girls received 58 stitches on her face, this violence hit home.
NEWS
March 7, 2011
Philadelphia Superintendent Arlene Ackerman should act quickly on recommendations to curb racial and ethnic violence and create a safer environment where students can learn. A report recently released by the city's Commission on Human Relations highlighted a series of problems that demand close attention. The report stems from a series of yearlong public hearings into racially motivated attacks on Asian students at South Philadelphia High in 2009, but it underscores a larger violence issue.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reported violence is down in city schools, and, for the first time since such records have been kept, none landed on the state's "persistently dangerous" list. The improvements, based on 2013-14 school-year data, come despite deep staffing cuts over the last several years, which have left fewer adults to monitor classrooms, hallways, and cafeterias. Philadelphia School District officials reported a 10 percent decline in violent incidents for the 2013-14 school year, to 2,485.
NEWS
August 19, 2014
ANOTHER WEEK, another crisis at the Philadelphia School District. Last week, it was over whether the school year will begin on time. Superintendent William Hite wisely decided it would, despite the fact that the district still is $81 million short of the money it needs to operate all year. Still, Hite had to slash another $31 million from the budget. When they open on September 8, schools will be more dangerous and dirty - due to the cuts in the budgets for police officers and maintenance.
NEWS
July 9, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
The struggling Chester Upland School District adopted a $118 million budget Monday that raises taxes by 3.4 percent, but a $12.3 million shortfall lingers, according to state-appointed receiver Joe Watkins. As the district continues to grapple with financial and academic problems, Watkins said he hoped to close the gap with help from the state. "We are in the process of righting this ship and are confident that we will succeed," he said, noting that the 3,000-student district shaved $6.2 million from the preliminary budget to narrow the spending gulf.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Susan Snyder and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
Violence remains a major problem in the Philadelphia public schools, and it's bound to get worse with the layoff of more than 1,200 aides who assist in the cafeterias, playgrounds, and other areas, says the union representing the workers. "Schoolchildren could face even greater danger this fall," Unite Here 634 said in a report issued Tuesday outlining incidents of violence and other incidents in the schools this year. On that point, the union and School District seem to agree. The 149,535-student district reported 2,672 violent incidents in 2012-13 through June 10, according to spokesman Fernando Gallard.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Miguelina Rodriguez walks into an alternative school program at an East Camden church for the start of the semester Thursday, she will pick up books and return home. No teachers will be there to help with a math equation, or classmates to study with. The Community Education Resource Network (CERN) has shut its in-house alternative program at Bethel United Methodist Church for lack of funding. It will support home schooling, but even that is on the verge of extinction. Townsend Press in Berlin has donated take-home material, but CERN founder Angel Cordero said the core of the program depends on students receiving face-to-face instruction.
NEWS
December 27, 2012
The school massacre in Newtown, Conn., has left the country searching for answers on how to make schools safer. A proposal by the National Rifle Association to put armed security guards in every school is not the solution. Neither are calls to arm classroom teachers. Adding firearms to any volatile situation is a recipe for a potential tragedy. Our schools should not look like armed camps or prisons. After a week of near-silence following the school shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School that left 20 children and six adults dead, the response last week from the NRA was predictable, but disappointing.
NEWS
December 16, 2012 | BY EMILY BABAY, Philly.com Staff Writer
THERE ARE some tips for parents and guardians on addressing questions from their children and resources for more advice on talking about the Connecticut school massacre. 1. Be available: Let children know you are available to answer their questions, according to Children's National Medical Center. But it's OK to not have all the answers, or to tell your children you need to find out the answer to a question. 2. Be creative: If they're having trouble talking about school violence, consider having them use art or music to express their feelings, the medical center says.
NEWS
December 15, 2012 | By Susan Snyder and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
Fourteen of the Philadelphia School District's most dangerous schools are among the 44 set to close or be relocated, according to an Inquirer analysis. That includes four neighborhood high schools - Strawberry Mansion, Germantown, Douglas, and Lamberton - that recorded at least five violent incidents per 100 students in 2011-12. But what impact closing the schools will have on overall safety in the 146,000-student district is uncertain, and some officials say there's the potential for things to get worse.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By Susan Snyder and Dylan Purcell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fourteen of the Philadelphia School District's most dangerous schools are among the 44 set to close or be relocated, according to an Inquirer analysis. That includes four neighborhood high schools - Strawberry Mansion, Germantown, Douglas and Lamberton - all of which recorded at least five violent incidents per 100 students in 2011-12. Of the 14, Strawberry Mansion topped the list, with more than 10 violent incidents per 100 students in each of the past five years. Last school year, it was the second most violent school in the district.
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Student bullying in New Jersey is concentrated in the middle-school grades, overwhelmingly verbal in nature, and not nearly as widespread on the Internet as some might think. That's the portrait that emerges from the state Department of Education's first in-depth examination of what is classified as "Harassment, Intimidation and Bullying," or HIB, in schools. But some education professionals question whether the statistics - contained in the department's annual report on school violence and vandalism, and reflecting a change in definition under the 2010 Anti-Bullying Bill of Rights Act - present a complete picture.
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