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FOOD
October 24, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Seventy-five schoolchildren will be learning how to slice onions, cook pasta, roast vegetables, and make dinners like stuffed peppers and homemade tomato soup this fall as My Daughter's Kitchen cooking program continues to expand and evolve in its fourth season. The mission remains the same as when the lessons began with my own daughter: teaching kids to cook simple, healthful, delicious meals on a budget. Thirty-two volunteers - most of them Inquirer readers who wrote in after reading about the program - will begin teaching 15 afterschool classes around the city and across the river in Camden.
NEWS
June 30, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Small high schools came to Philadelphia in a big way four years ago, when four new ones opened their doors. Less than three miles apart, High School of the Future in Parkside and Science Leadership Academy (SLA) in Center City had vastly different beginnings. Expectations for both were high. Both awarded their first diplomas this month. But although leadership was identified as key to both, one had turmoil at the top and the other had a stable principal. Though both emphasized technology and were given freedom to innovate, one kept a close eye on district standards and the other initially veered from the path.
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Ibrahim Barzak and Dalia Nammari, Associated Press
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - Starting with the new school year in September, Gaza boys and girls in middle and high school will be breaking the law if they study side by side. Gaza's Islamic militant Hamas rulers argue that new legislation, mandating gender separation in schools from age 9, enshrines common practice. But women's activists warned Tuesday that it's another step in what it sees as the Hamas agenda of imposing its fundamentalist world view on Gaza's 1.7 million people. The Gaza rules appear harsh compared to Western practice but are not unusual in parts of the Arab and Muslim world.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
SUPERINTENDENT William R. Hite Jr., saying he had "few options," announced Thursday that the School District will recommend closing 37 schools as part of a plan to establish "a school system that is better run, safer and higher performing. " Calling it "a historic moment," Hite said his recommendations also included changing the grade levels of 23 schools and making other program changes affecting another seven. The total savings for the district could be up to $28 million beginning in 2014-15, he said.
NEWS
June 4, 2007
What qualities are important for a new Philadelphia schools chief? We'd like to hear from Philadelphia residents in 150 words or less. E-mail us at suburbanletters@phillynews.com or write us at Regional Commentary Page, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 800 River Rd., Conshohocken, Pa., 19428. All letters must include a full name, home address, and day and evening phone numbers.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Michelle Faul, Associated Press
LAGOS, Nigeria - Shaking a finger while cradling an assault rifle, the leader of Nigeria's extremist Islamic sect threatened to burn down more schools and kill teachers. But he denied that his fighters were killing children. In a new video released Saturday, Islamic radical Abubakar Shekau said he "fully supports" attacks on several schools in recent weeks. The U.N. Children's Fund says at least 48 students and seven teachers have been killed since June, with some burned alive this month in a dormitory.
NEWS
December 27, 2005
Let me commend you for reporting that "the Eastern PA Organizing Project, a faith-based and community group... " rebuked the School District of Philadelphia. Faith groups can and should rebuke secular organizations, for faith groups are better at changing lives than secular organizations. We are accountable to the God who made us, whereas secular organizations leave out God all together. The only hope for improving the educational system in America is impacting the Word of God upon it. Thomas Muldoon, Philadelphia
NEWS
August 9, 2013
THIRTY-ONE days just became seven. If City Council doesn't move on certifying $50 million in proceeds from the sales tax to the School District by next Friday, Superintendent William Hite says he will be unable to open the schools on Sept. 9. So the daily countdown of time remaining in the standoff between the schools and the state and city lawmakers who have fallen short of finding the money the schools need to open has just been shortened. More to the point, Hite has finally introduced the nuclear option.
SPORTS
January 15, 2012 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
With three of the league's football-playing schools set to close in June, Catholic League athletic directors on Thursday approved a proposal by football coaches to divide the league into two divisions. As it previously did, the five-team Red Division (Class AAAA) will include Archbishop Ryan, Father Judge, La Salle, Roman Catholic, and St. Joseph's Prep. The six-team Blue Division, a mix of Class AAA and AA schools, will consist of Archbishop Carroll (Class AA), Archbishop Wood (AAA)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 31, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Children's Scholarship Fund Philadelphia announced Thursday that 2,000 new, four-year scholarships were available to help low-income city families send their children to nonpublic schools for kindergarten through eighth grade. The scholarships begin with the 2015-16 academic year. Established in 1998, Children's Scholarship Fund Philadelphia now provides financial aid to 4,500 city children at 185 nonpublic schools. The typical recipient gets $1,775 per year and comes from a household where the average annual income is $29,000 for a family of four.
NEWS
October 30, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
      X'Aria Elliott had been hearing rumors for days that the Walter D. Palmer charter might close its high school program.       But the senior was stunned nevertheless when she got a call from a friend Sunday night saying her school was shutting down immediately.       "I didn't get a reality check until the next morning," said Elliott, 17. "I just wanted to cry. "       Elliott, who enrolled at Palmer after being home-schooled in seventh and eighth grades, said her senior year had been ruined.
NEWS
October 30, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying that a stream of employees had left, been transferred, or forced out under the new superintendent, 25 former Cheltenham school board members, along with teachers, PTO presidents, and current residents, have warned in a letter to the school board that the district "is in dire straits and that there is a failure of leadership. " The signers, including a retired principal, wrote that they talked to dozens of teachers who say "there is fear and intimidation and misinformation being promulgated" under Superintendent Natalie Thomas.
SPORTS
October 29, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5814
KEVIN CARTER is quite the concoction. The 5-10, 178-pound junior quarterback for the Haverford School has all the physical ingredients to befuddle opposing defenses. Start with a strong arm; then, sprinkle in some nimble feet, and go heavy on the breakaway speed. And poise; don't skimp on the poise. In fact, it's possible that Carter's best attribute isn't physical at all. The space between the Overbrook resident's ears - where he's learned to manage the game and harness his composure - is perhaps where his best attributes lie. "What I like about him is that we expected him to be our starter this season and sometimes a guy could get a little bit of a big head, but he never had that head-swell," said coach Mike Murphy.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
A CROWD OF angry parents confronted the founder of Walter D. Palmer Leadership Learning Partners Charter School last night, demanding answers about yesterday's abrupt closing of the high school, affecting almost 300 students. Walter Palmer met with families inside a packed cafeteria at the school's Frankford campus, on Harbison Avenue near Sanger Street - the location of grades 5-12 - to explain the decision to close the high school immediately and help families of ninth- through 12th-graders find other school placements.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
CALL IT a leap of faith or call it a risky move. The Philadelphia School District announced yesterday that it would distribute $15 million to schools on Monday from projected health-care savings with the teachers union, despite an injunction temporarily blocking the changes. Common Pleas Judge Nina Wright Padilla last week ruled in favor of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers' request to stay all changes to their health-care benefits. The district and the School Reform Commission said they would appeal the decision.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
POLICE MADE a major break yesterday in a disturbing sexual-assault case involving four middle school students. Late yesterday afternoon, investigators arrested two 13-year-old boys who allegedly coerced an 11-year-old schoolmate at William Tilden Middle School into performing a sexual act on them earlier this month and filmed the encounter, a law-enforcement source said. Afterward, police said, the teens posted the video online. The boys - whose names are being withheld because they are minors - are being charged with rape, indecent assault, unlawful restraint and related offenses, the source said.
NEWS
October 29, 2014
Imagine buying a car and never doing routine maintenance. That's pretty much the case with Pennsylvania's charter-school law, which was passed back in 1997 and hasn't been touched since. In the meantime, the world of charters has changed dramatically. In 1998, charter enrollment in the state was just a blip on the screen. Today, 120,000 students statewide are enrolled in bricks-and-mortar or cyber charters, among them 67,000 students in Philadelphia alone. While charter operators and school boards disagree on many things, they both believe it is time to update the law. Last year, a bipartisan commission came up with a series of recommendations for a new law. Bills were duly introduced in the House and Senate, and that's where the issue has sat all year.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The embattled Walter D. Palmer Leadership Learning Partners Charter School is closing its high school two months into the academic year. The move affects 286 students in ninth through 12th grades at the charter's secondary campus in Frankford. In an e-mail sent to staff Sunday, the school's chief administrative officer said the students would be welcome to transfer to West Philadelphia High School. A parents' meeting was scheduled for 6 p.m. Monday to explain that transfer process, as well as other options for students at district, charter, cyber and Catholic schools.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Ben Finley and Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writers
Parents of Central Bucks High School West football players expressed a variety of emotions Monday night during a private meeting with the school district's superintendent and the Bucks County district attorney, the first time officials have met with parents since the district canceled the rest of the football season over allegations of hazing. For more than an hour in the Doylestown school's auditorium, Superintendent David Weitzel addressed about 75 parents and took questions from the audience, said the father of a sophomore player who did not want to be identified.
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