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NEWS
September 17, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Dorothy June Brown undergoes a mental exam to determine whether she is competent for retrial on charges that she defrauded the schools she founded of $6.3 million, the charters' legal bills from the first trial have been tallied. Records that The Inquirer obtained under the state Right-to-Know Law show Brown's three Philadelphia charters spent more than $925,000 in taxpayer money on the case. Annual revenues for each of those schools range from $4 million to $4.5 million, according to the most recent published figures.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Gov. Corbett might not get the memo after all. Despite 40,000 signatures on a petition from school reform advocates and a morning rally outside City Hall, Philadelphia City Council on Thursday killed an effort that would have asked the governor to dissolve the School Reform Commission. In its first meeting since returning from summer recess, Council introduced a flurry of bills but also passed on some legislation left over from the spring term, including a resolution to put a question on the November ballot asking voters if they support abolishing the SRC and returning schools to local control.
SPORTS
September 13, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
Rutgers coach Kyle Flood and Penn State coach James Franklin deserve some applause for doing their little part to hype Saturday night's football game. Franklin got in the first shot in the spring, calling New Jersey (and Maryland) in-state recruiting territory for the Nittany Lions. Flood got the last word, often declining to put the words Penn and State together in the lead-up, preferring The team from Pennsylvania. That does have a kind of rhythmic charm. It's coincidental, by the way, that the Scarlet Knights open their life in the Big Ten Conference against TTFP.
NEWS
June 30, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Small high schools came to Philadelphia in a big way four years ago, when four new ones opened their doors. Less than three miles apart, High School of the Future in Parkside and Science Leadership Academy (SLA) in Center City had vastly different beginnings. Expectations for both were high. Both awarded their first diplomas this month. But although leadership was identified as key to both, one had turmoil at the top and the other had a stable principal. Though both emphasized technology and were given freedom to innovate, one kept a close eye on district standards and the other initially veered from the path.
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Ibrahim Barzak and Dalia Nammari, Associated Press
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - Starting with the new school year in September, Gaza boys and girls in middle and high school will be breaking the law if they study side by side. Gaza's Islamic militant Hamas rulers argue that new legislation, mandating gender separation in schools from age 9, enshrines common practice. But women's activists warned Tuesday that it's another step in what it sees as the Hamas agenda of imposing its fundamentalist world view on Gaza's 1.7 million people. The Gaza rules appear harsh compared to Western practice but are not unusual in parts of the Arab and Muslim world.
NEWS
June 4, 2007
What qualities are important for a new Philadelphia schools chief? We'd like to hear from Philadelphia residents in 150 words or less. E-mail us at suburbanletters@phillynews.com or write us at Regional Commentary Page, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 800 River Rd., Conshohocken, Pa., 19428. All letters must include a full name, home address, and day and evening phone numbers.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Michelle Faul, Associated Press
LAGOS, Nigeria - Shaking a finger while cradling an assault rifle, the leader of Nigeria's extremist Islamic sect threatened to burn down more schools and kill teachers. But he denied that his fighters were killing children. In a new video released Saturday, Islamic radical Abubakar Shekau said he "fully supports" attacks on several schools in recent weeks. The U.N. Children's Fund says at least 48 students and seven teachers have been killed since June, with some burned alive this month in a dormitory.
NEWS
December 27, 2005
Let me commend you for reporting that "the Eastern PA Organizing Project, a faith-based and community group... " rebuked the School District of Philadelphia. Faith groups can and should rebuke secular organizations, for faith groups are better at changing lives than secular organizations. We are accountable to the God who made us, whereas secular organizations leave out God all together. The only hope for improving the educational system in America is impacting the Word of God upon it. Thomas Muldoon, Philadelphia
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
SUPERINTENDENT William R. Hite Jr., saying he had "few options," announced Thursday that the School District will recommend closing 37 schools as part of a plan to establish "a school system that is better run, safer and higher performing. " Calling it "a historic moment," Hite said his recommendations also included changing the grade levels of 23 schools and making other program changes affecting another seven. The total savings for the district could be up to $28 million beginning in 2014-15, he said.
NEWS
August 9, 2013
THIRTY-ONE days just became seven. If City Council doesn't move on certifying $50 million in proceeds from the sales tax to the School District by next Friday, Superintendent William Hite says he will be unable to open the schools on Sept. 9. So the daily countdown of time remaining in the standoff between the schools and the state and city lawmakers who have fallen short of finding the money the schools need to open has just been shortened. More to the point, Hite has finally introduced the nuclear option.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
As principal at John Wister Elementary School in East Germantown, Donna Smith is used to stretching scant resources. But this year is different. "Bare necessities are difficult," she said. "During the 13 years I've been here, it's never been as bad as it is right now. My entire budget for basic supplies is a little over $3,000 for the school year. " That's less than $7 per student, making things like copy paper unaffordable luxuries. As Philadelphia public schools reopened last week in the face of an $81 million deficit and the prospect of 1,000 layoffs if a cigarette-tax hike isn't approved, supplying paper was the least of Smith's worries - which include deep cuts to crucial supportive teaching staff.
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writer
The day after the improbable news came out that Playboy had ranked the University of Pennsylvania as the top party school in the nation, the mood on Locust Walk was, like many things in the Ivies, mixed. There was pride: Penn had accomplished what no other Ivy League school had done - make the list. Not only that, Penn debuted at No. 1. Playboy has published such a list nine times since 1987, when California State University, Chico, took home the prize. Sophomore communications major Hope Mackenzie said she was among the many who felt honored by the designation.
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saliyah Cruz, a dynamic educator whom officials were counting on to help build a new kind of high school, is leaving the Philadelphia School District, she confirmed Wednesday. Cruz, the founding principal of Learning in New Contexts - a high school opened with much fanfare less than two weeks ago - declined to say what her new job would be. Her departure is an unexpected blow to Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. and his push for innovation. Cruz was the chief designer of the LINC, as it is known, one of the district's three new small, personalized, project-based high schools.
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
In one of the largest gifts ever to a U.S. law school, Drexel University said Wednesday that Philadelphia trial lawyer Thomas R. Kline would give the eight-year-old school $50 million to bolster its effort to reach the top ranks of legal education. Drexel president John A. Fry said the money would be used to fund scholarships, add faculty, and expand the law school's trial-advocacy program, which provides training for lawyers who plan to focus on courtroom practice. Included in the gift is the former Beneficial Saving Fund Society building at 12th and Chestnut Streets, an imposing Classical Revival-style structure that has been vacant since 2001 and that will house the law school's Institute for Trial Advocacy.
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Chris Hepp and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
With the 2015 primary still eight months away, Ken Trujillo launched his bid for mayor at a sprinter's pace Wednesday with positions big and small on education, policing, and business development. A former city solicitor under Mayor John F. Street, Trujillo in short order declared he would: Press to end state control of city schools. Establish universal prekindergarten education. Cut the illiteracy rate in half. End racial profiling and stop-and-frisk tactics by police.
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
KEN TRUJILLO really wanted this story to be about Ken Trujillo. But the Democratic primary election for mayor is just eight months away and the city yesterday entered the "Me too!" phase of the campaign. Trujillo, a former city solicitor, stood in front of the Philadelphia School District yesterday to formally announce his run for mayor. He gave voice to a platform loaded with ambitions for public schools, but short on details of how his goals would be reached. City Controller Alan Butkovitz, a likely contender for the Democratic nomination, issued a juicy news release shortly after that, accusing Mayor Nutter of operating a City Hall "VIP hot line" for the well-heeled to get services.
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
FEWER THAN two weeks after welcoming families as the face of a new high school, Saliyah Cruz is already saying goodbye. The school-design leader of Learning in New Contexts, also known as the LINC, told her staff on Tuesday that she is leaving the district. A district spokesman said Cruz will leave in early to mid-October, although an exact date has not been determined. The LINC, on Erie Avenue near 2nd Street, is one of three new technology-driven schools in the district open to all students, with an emphasis on problem solving and personalized learning.
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marguerite L. Johnson, 85, of the Carroll Park section of West Philadelphia, a nurse-practitioner who worked in city schools for 22 years, died Tuesday, Sept. 2, at ManorCare Health Services-Yeadon of a heart condition. Offering comfort and care to all who came through her office, Mrs. Johnson held a number of posts in Philadelphia and New York throughout her 43-year nursing career. A Philadelphia native, Mrs. Johnson went to New York after her high school graduation in 1946 to attend the Lincoln School for Nurses in the Bronx, which was founded in 1898 to train black women to become nurses.
NEWS
September 17, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Dorothy June Brown undergoes a mental exam to determine whether she is competent for retrial on charges that she defrauded the schools she founded of $6.3 million, the charters' legal bills from the first trial have been tallied. Records that The Inquirer obtained under the state Right-to-Know Law show Brown's three Philadelphia charters spent more than $925,000 in taxpayer money on the case. Annual revenues for each of those schools range from $4 million to $4.5 million, according to the most recent published figures.
NEWS
September 17, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
With tens of millions of dollars and more than 1,000 Philadelphia School District jobs on the line, all eyes shifted to Harrisburg on Monday as lawmakers returned from their summer break. District leaders say they need a $2-per-pack cigarette tax passed quickly to help fill an $81 million deficit, and prevent mass layoffs and larger class sizes. Philadelphia officials said they would keep the pressure on high until the tax is passed. Mayor Nutter, a familiar face in the state Capitol in recent months, plans to travel to Harrisburg again this week.
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