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NEWS
June 30, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Small high schools came to Philadelphia in a big way four years ago, when four new ones opened their doors. Less than three miles apart, High School of the Future in Parkside and Science Leadership Academy (SLA) in Center City had vastly different beginnings. Expectations for both were high. Both awarded their first diplomas this month. But although leadership was identified as key to both, one had turmoil at the top and the other had a stable principal. Though both emphasized technology and were given freedom to innovate, one kept a close eye on district standards and the other initially veered from the path.
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Ibrahim Barzak and Dalia Nammari, Associated Press
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - Starting with the new school year in September, Gaza boys and girls in middle and high school will be breaking the law if they study side by side. Gaza's Islamic militant Hamas rulers argue that new legislation, mandating gender separation in schools from age 9, enshrines common practice. But women's activists warned Tuesday that it's another step in what it sees as the Hamas agenda of imposing its fundamentalist world view on Gaza's 1.7 million people. The Gaza rules appear harsh compared to Western practice but are not unusual in parts of the Arab and Muslim world.
FOOD
October 24, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Seventy-five schoolchildren will be learning how to slice onions, cook pasta, roast vegetables, and make dinners like stuffed peppers and homemade tomato soup this fall as My Daughter's Kitchen cooking program continues to expand and evolve in its fourth season. The mission remains the same as when the lessons began with my own daughter: teaching kids to cook simple, healthful, delicious meals on a budget. Thirty-two volunteers - most of them Inquirer readers who wrote in after reading about the program - will begin teaching 15 afterschool classes around the city and across the river in Camden.
NEWS
April 30, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
IN 1939, a 6-year-old boy moved to Detroit with his working-class parents - Lithuanian Jewish immigrants - and walked into the remarkable engine that propelled so much of America's prosperity in the 20th century, his neighborhood public school. That kid, Eli Broad, graduated from Detroit Central High School in 1951 and went on to become one of the world's richest people, a billionaire who made his fortune first in the post-World War II housing boom and later in insurance. Today, the 79-year-old Broad (it rhymes with "road")
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
SUPERINTENDENT William R. Hite Jr., saying he had "few options," announced Thursday that the School District will recommend closing 37 schools as part of a plan to establish "a school system that is better run, safer and higher performing. " Calling it "a historic moment," Hite said his recommendations also included changing the grade levels of 23 schools and making other program changes affecting another seven. The total savings for the district could be up to $28 million beginning in 2014-15, he said.
NEWS
June 4, 2007
What qualities are important for a new Philadelphia schools chief? We'd like to hear from Philadelphia residents in 150 words or less. E-mail us at suburbanletters@phillynews.com or write us at Regional Commentary Page, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 800 River Rd., Conshohocken, Pa., 19428. All letters must include a full name, home address, and day and evening phone numbers.
NEWS
December 27, 2005
Let me commend you for reporting that "the Eastern PA Organizing Project, a faith-based and community group... " rebuked the School District of Philadelphia. Faith groups can and should rebuke secular organizations, for faith groups are better at changing lives than secular organizations. We are accountable to the God who made us, whereas secular organizations leave out God all together. The only hope for improving the educational system in America is impacting the Word of God upon it. Thomas Muldoon, Philadelphia
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Michelle Faul, Associated Press
LAGOS, Nigeria - Shaking a finger while cradling an assault rifle, the leader of Nigeria's extremist Islamic sect threatened to burn down more schools and kill teachers. But he denied that his fighters were killing children. In a new video released Saturday, Islamic radical Abubakar Shekau said he "fully supports" attacks on several schools in recent weeks. The U.N. Children's Fund says at least 48 students and seven teachers have been killed since June, with some burned alive this month in a dormitory.
NEWS
August 9, 2013
THIRTY-ONE days just became seven. If City Council doesn't move on certifying $50 million in proceeds from the sales tax to the School District by next Friday, Superintendent William Hite says he will be unable to open the schools on Sept. 9. So the daily countdown of time remaining in the standoff between the schools and the state and city lawmakers who have fallen short of finding the money the schools need to open has just been shortened. More to the point, Hite has finally introduced the nuclear option.
SPORTS
January 15, 2012 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
With three of the league's football-playing schools set to close in June, Catholic League athletic directors on Thursday approved a proposal by football coaches to divide the league into two divisions. As it previously did, the five-team Red Division (Class AAAA) will include Archbishop Ryan, Father Judge, La Salle, Roman Catholic, and St. Joseph's Prep. The six-team Blue Division, a mix of Class AAA and AA schools, will consist of Archbishop Carroll (Class AA), Archbishop Wood (AAA)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Louis F. Cappelli Sr. was the football team center at Camden High School in the 1950s, he learned more than how to hike. "His football coach at Camden High inspired him to be an educator," his son, Louis Jr., said. So besides beginning his career as a physical education teacher at Moorestown High School in the late 1960s, he eventually became the head track coach and an assistant football coach there too, his son said. On Thursday, Feb. 12, Mr. Cappelli, 80, of Collingswood, principal for 24 years at Triton Regional High School in Runnemede, died at his home of a heart attack.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
AMID PROTESTS, the School Reform Commission last night voted to authorize five new charter schools - the first stand-alone charters approved in Philadelphia since 2007 - while rejecting 34 others. Following more than four hours of passionate testimony, the commission approved conditional charters for Independence Charter West, KIPP Dubois, Mastery Gillespie, MaST Community Charter-Roosevelt and TECH Freire, creating a total of 2,684 charter seats over the next three years. The approved operators each have existing schools in the district and are scheduled to open their new facilities in September 2016.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | By Martha Woodall and Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writers
Amid intense pressure from all sides, the Philadelphia School Reform Commission voted Wednesday night to approve five new charter schools from among the 39 applications at the end of an often tumultuous evening. The successful applicants were offered three-year charters with a long list of conditions. SRC Chairman Bill Green said the charter operators and the commission have until May 31 to agree on terms. The approved plans came from existing nonprofits that have operated successful charter schools in the city for years: KIPP, Mastery, Freire, Independence, and MaST.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodore Ruger, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania Law School since 2004, has been appointed dean of the law school, effective July 1. Ruger, 46, who teaches constitutional law and health-related law and regulation, succeeds Michael A. Fitts, who left in July to become president of Tulane University. Wendell Pritchett has been interim dean and will continue as a professor on the faculties of the law school and the Graduate School of Education. Pritchett, 50, taught at Penn Law from 2001 to 2009, when he left to become chancellor of Rutgers-Camden.
SPORTS
February 19, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
Let's take a snapshot of how realignment has played out so far for the Big East and the American Athletic Conference - the offshoots of the old Big East, the powerhouse Big East. According to projections, if the season ended right now, six of the 10 Big East schools would be in the NCAA tournament. That's a higher percentage than the current chances of the 2012-13 schools. From that old group, seven of the 14 are projected to get in. Would the Big East like to have Louisville and Notre Dame?
NEWS
February 19, 2015 | Solomon Leach, Daily News Staff Writer
FOUR CANDIDATES in the mayor's race are urging the School Reform Commission to just say no to new charter schools. Democratic hopefuls James Kenney, Lynne Abraham, Nelson Diaz and Doug Oliver all signed on to a letter yesterday from the Philadelphia Coalition Advocating for Public Schools calling for the SRC to reject all 39 applications ahead of its vote today on the applications. The only Democratic candidates for mayor who haven't endorsed the letter are state Sen. Anthony Williams, a vocal charter supporter, T. Milton Street and the Rev. Keith Goodman.
NEWS
February 19, 2015 | Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five of six Democratic mayoral candidates have called for the School Reform Commission to reject 39 charter-school applications to be considered on Wednesday. Only State Sen. Anthony H. Williams, long a charter-school champion, voiced no opposition to the vote. "A blanket moratorium on charter expansion makes a nice headline, but it's really just a political solution to an education problem," Williams said in a prepared statement. "We need solutions that make sense for our children, first and foremost.
NEWS
February 18, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard F. Rafferty, 87, of Warrington, a teacher who rose to become an associate superintendent of the Philadelphia School District, died Thursday, Feb. 12, of complications from a stroke at Neshaminy Manor. Dr. Rafferty's career with the city's schools spanned four decades starting in 1949, when he signed on as a teacher at McKean Elementary School. In the early 1950s, he taught social studies at Bartlett Junior High School, where he was promoted to vice principal. He went on to become principal of Stanton Elementary School and then Harding Junior High School, Daniel Boone Remedial Disciplinary School, and Lincoln High School.
NEWS
February 18, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just days before the fate of 39 new charter-school applications is decided, pressure on the School Reform Commission is building from all sides. Top state Senate Republicans have sent Chairman Bill Green a letter saying they were "confident" that the SRC would approve strong charter schools. The letter, obtained by The Inquirer and sent Friday by Senate President Pro Tempore Joe Scarnati (R., Jefferson), Majority Leader Jake Corman (R., Centre), and Education Committee Chairman Lloyd Smucker (R., Lancaster)
NEWS
February 17, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
With Pennsylvania's support for schools submerged at a disgraceful 45th in the nation, the commonwealth has no choice but to increase education funding. Voters said as much in November. Teacher layoffs and local tax hikes that did not make up for losses in educational services motivated many Pennsylvanians to vote for Tom Wolf, who promised to adequately fund schools, over Gov. Tom Corbett. That public sentiment remains, according to a recent Mercyhurst University poll, which showed that a majority of the state's residents would support more funding for public schools as well as a 5 percent natural-gas tax. Linking the two, Gov. Wolf unveiled his proposal to tax gas drilling in the stressed Coatesville school district last week.
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