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NEWS
July 6, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
After his freshman year of college in South Carolina, Ronald Torres cried the whole way back to Camden. "I was like, man, I can't believe this is happening to me," the 20-year-old said. After two semesters spent worrying about his ill grandmother, distracting him from studies, Torres had also lost some of his financial aid, leaving him unable to return to South Carolina State University after finishing freshman year in 2015. "It's not so straightforward as some people try to put it," Torres said.
NEWS
June 30, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Small high schools came to Philadelphia in a big way four years ago, when four new ones opened their doors. Less than three miles apart, High School of the Future in Parkside and Science Leadership Academy (SLA) in Center City had vastly different beginnings. Expectations for both were high. Both awarded their first diplomas this month. But although leadership was identified as key to both, one had turmoil at the top and the other had a stable principal. Though both emphasized technology and were given freedom to innovate, one kept a close eye on district standards and the other initially veered from the path.
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Ibrahim Barzak and Dalia Nammari, Associated Press
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - Starting with the new school year in September, Gaza boys and girls in middle and high school will be breaking the law if they study side by side. Gaza's Islamic militant Hamas rulers argue that new legislation, mandating gender separation in schools from age 9, enshrines common practice. But women's activists warned Tuesday that it's another step in what it sees as the Hamas agenda of imposing its fundamentalist world view on Gaza's 1.7 million people. The Gaza rules appear harsh compared to Western practice but are not unusual in parts of the Arab and Muslim world.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
James Crisfield knew that Wissahickon High School scored very well on the latest School Performance Profile, but on Wednesday, the superintendent was surprised to learn that the school was No. 1 in Pennsylvania. While Crisfield called it "a nice honor," he said the 101.8 SPP score, weighted heavily by standardized tests, isn't necessarily the best indicator of student achievement. Lynne Blair, principal at the Montgomery County school, was more enthusiastic. "It is very exciting!"
NEWS
June 4, 2007
What qualities are important for a new Philadelphia schools chief? We'd like to hear from Philadelphia residents in 150 words or less. E-mail us at suburbanletters@phillynews.com or write us at Regional Commentary Page, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 800 River Rd., Conshohocken, Pa., 19428. All letters must include a full name, home address, and day and evening phone numbers.
NEWS
December 27, 2005
Let me commend you for reporting that "the Eastern PA Organizing Project, a faith-based and community group... " rebuked the School District of Philadelphia. Faith groups can and should rebuke secular organizations, for faith groups are better at changing lives than secular organizations. We are accountable to the God who made us, whereas secular organizations leave out God all together. The only hope for improving the educational system in America is impacting the Word of God upon it. Thomas Muldoon, Philadelphia
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
SUPERINTENDENT William R. Hite Jr., saying he had "few options," announced Thursday that the School District will recommend closing 37 schools as part of a plan to establish "a school system that is better run, safer and higher performing. " Calling it "a historic moment," Hite said his recommendations also included changing the grade levels of 23 schools and making other program changes affecting another seven. The total savings for the district could be up to $28 million beginning in 2014-15, he said.
NEWS
September 8, 2010 | Inquirer Staff Report
Mayor Nutter, himself a product of a parochial education, was on hand today to greet youngsters at a Catholic school in North Philadelphia as the 2010-11 academic year began for the 72,000 students attending schools operated by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. It also was the first day of school for Catholic schools in South Jersey. Nutter, a graduate of Transfiguration of Our Lord Catholic Elementary School in West Philadelphia and St. Joseph's Prep, greeted students at Incarnation of Our Lord Elementary School, 425 W. Lindley Ave., in Olney.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Michelle Faul, Associated Press
LAGOS, Nigeria - Shaking a finger while cradling an assault rifle, the leader of Nigeria's extremist Islamic sect threatened to burn down more schools and kill teachers. But he denied that his fighters were killing children. In a new video released Saturday, Islamic radical Abubakar Shekau said he "fully supports" attacks on several schools in recent weeks. The U.N. Children's Fund says at least 48 students and seven teachers have been killed since June, with some burned alive this month in a dormitory.
NEWS
August 9, 2013
THIRTY-ONE days just became seven. If City Council doesn't move on certifying $50 million in proceeds from the sales tax to the School District by next Friday, Superintendent William Hite says he will be unable to open the schools on Sept. 9. So the daily countdown of time remaining in the standoff between the schools and the state and city lawmakers who have fallen short of finding the money the schools need to open has just been shortened. More to the point, Hite has finally introduced the nuclear option.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 19, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School District's bills for a case it lost in federal court last month over a no-bid contract for security cameras could total $3.6 million. Following a six-day trial in late June, a federal jury found that the district and former Superintendent Arlene C. Ackerman had discriminated against Security & Data Technologies Inc. (SDT) when she steered a $7.5 million no-bid contract to a smaller, minority-owned firm that had not sought the work. Jurors awarded the losing firm $2.3 million in damages.
REAL_ESTATE
July 18, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Staff Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. As small towns go, Rutledge is one of the smallest around here - just 798 people in one square mile of Delaware County. That's the number the borough's website gives as the population of Rutledge. The U.S. Census says that as of 2010, there were 784 people, down from 860 in 2000, but that's not the only fact about Rutledge that seems to be disputed. More on that later. When it comes to real estate, this isn't a very active place - the fact that the public record shows only 277 property owners could be the reason why. Among the many things this town has going for it, says S. Clark Kendus of D. Patrick Welsh Real Estate, is that of the communities that comprise the Wallingford-Swarthmore School District - Swarthmore, Rose Valley, Nether Providence (Wallingford is within that township's borders)
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, STAFF WRITER
The Shipley School in Lower Merion announced Friday that a student who was reported missing earlier in the week had likely taken his own life. "Although everyone was praying for a good outcome, I do not have good news," Head of School Stephen Piltch wrote in a letter posted to the school's website Friday. Austin Wylie, 17, was entering his senior year. He was described as a talented player on the school's soccer team and the club team FC Europa. On Thursday, Philadelphia marine units were searching the Delaware River near where Wylie's car had been found, according to police sources.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
Four years ago, a classic yellow school bus gave online eyewear company Warby Parker the confidence to open brick-and-mortar stores. On Friday the bus returned to town enabling Warby to sell eyewear in the park across from the Philadelphia Museum of Art. A half-dozen people had climbed aboard the Warby Parker Class Trip bus at Eakins Oval just before 1 p.m. to try on glasses, with an optician on hand to take measurements and write prescriptions....
NEWS
July 16, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School District will receive an additional $50 million in state funds this fiscal year under the spending plan approved Wednesday in Harrisburg, district officials said. While that's $6 million less than expected, officials said the shortfall was manageable and could be partially offset by the district's share of funds collected from ride-sharing services in the city. "I do think that it is important to acknowledge the governor, the leaders of both parties, and the Philadelphia delegation," Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. said during a short news briefing on the budget Thursday.
NEWS
July 16, 2016
ISSUE | EDUCATION Fund schools equally As a former member of the Lower Merion school board, I disagree with the commentary about the controversies involving charter schools and student testing ("Can Real World and Education World get along?" Wednesday). Neither annual testing nor state-based curricular standards will help our young people learn. We already know that large numbers of students in Lower Merion test "advanced" and that too many students in the Philadelphia School District - whether in charter schools or traditional public schools - test "below basic.
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Colt Shaw, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - The Philadelphia School District would receive a portion of receipts generated by Uber and other ride-sharing services in the city under language that budget negotiators have inserted in a fiscal bill. The bill, passed by the House and the Senate on Wednesday, also would let companies such as Uber and Lyft operate legally in the city at least until Sept. 30. Uber already had secured that permission in an agreement announced last week. Under the measure, which awaits Gov. Wolf's signature, ride-sharing services would pay 1 percent of their gross receipts from fares that originate in the city to the Philadelphia Parking Authority.
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Erin Serpico, Staff Writer
The Kingsway Regional School District in Gloucester County has jumped into the statewide debate over competing ideas to more equitably fund New Jersey's public schools. Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) convened a forum Wednesday in Woolwich Township to push his plan to bring every school district to "adequacy" funding within five years by reallocating existing aid and adding up to $100 million a year. "We're not looking to defund anybody; we're looking to treat every child equally," Sweeney said, adding that he wants to have the money follow the children while recognizing each child's specific needs.
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, STAFF WRITER martha.woodall@ phillynews.com 215-854-2789 @marwooda
A teacher at beleaguered Delaware Valley Charter High School has asked the Philadelphia School District's top financial official to reconsider withholding $820,000 in payments to the school this summer. The district said the charter school in Logan owes the money for overbilling for students in past years and failing to make required pension payments for teachers. But Matthew Black, 27, who has taught math at the school for two years, said it's the teachers and other staffers who were hurt when the charter could not make payroll last week.
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis and Martha Woodall, STAFF WRITERS
HARRISBURG - Negotiators inched toward an agreement Tuesday that would impose new taxes on cigarettes and digital downloads in Pennsylvania, but a proposal to loosen caps on charter-school enrollment emerged as a sticking point in striking a budget deal, top senators said. Critics of the proposed changes say they would leave Philadelphia and other cash-strapped school districts with little say in managing the surge of charters within their borders - and the added costs they can bring.
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