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NEWS
April 21, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
A Central New Jersey school superintendent was out for a run with his dog when he was struck and killed by a student's car early Tuesday, prompting all schools in the Mercer County district to close. Robbinsville Superintendent Steven Mayer, 52, was running around 6:15 a.m. when he was hit on Robbinsville-Edinburg Road near his home, authorities said. Acting Police Chief Chris Nitti said a 17-year-old Robbinsville High School student was driving the vehicle that struck Mayer.
NEWS
June 30, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Small high schools came to Philadelphia in a big way four years ago, when four new ones opened their doors. Less than three miles apart, High School of the Future in Parkside and Science Leadership Academy (SLA) in Center City had vastly different beginnings. Expectations for both were high. Both awarded their first diplomas this month. But although leadership was identified as key to both, one had turmoil at the top and the other had a stable principal. Though both emphasized technology and were given freedom to innovate, one kept a close eye on district standards and the other initially veered from the path.
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Ibrahim Barzak and Dalia Nammari, Associated Press
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - Starting with the new school year in September, Gaza boys and girls in middle and high school will be breaking the law if they study side by side. Gaza's Islamic militant Hamas rulers argue that new legislation, mandating gender separation in schools from age 9, enshrines common practice. But women's activists warned Tuesday that it's another step in what it sees as the Hamas agenda of imposing its fundamentalist world view on Gaza's 1.7 million people. The Gaza rules appear harsh compared to Western practice but are not unusual in parts of the Arab and Muslim world.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
James Crisfield knew that Wissahickon High School scored very well on the latest School Performance Profile, but on Wednesday, the superintendent was surprised to learn that the school was No. 1 in Pennsylvania. While Crisfield called it "a nice honor," he said the 101.8 SPP score, weighted heavily by standardized tests, isn't necessarily the best indicator of student achievement. Lynne Blair, principal at the Montgomery County school, was more enthusiastic. "It is very exciting!"
NEWS
April 30, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
IN 1939, a 6-year-old boy moved to Detroit with his working-class parents - Lithuanian Jewish immigrants - and walked into the remarkable engine that propelled so much of America's prosperity in the 20th century, his neighborhood public school. That kid, Eli Broad, graduated from Detroit Central High School in 1951 and went on to become one of the world's richest people, a billionaire who made his fortune first in the post-World War II housing boom and later in insurance. Today, the 79-year-old Broad (it rhymes with "road")
NEWS
June 4, 2007
What qualities are important for a new Philadelphia schools chief? We'd like to hear from Philadelphia residents in 150 words or less. E-mail us at suburbanletters@phillynews.com or write us at Regional Commentary Page, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 800 River Rd., Conshohocken, Pa., 19428. All letters must include a full name, home address, and day and evening phone numbers.
NEWS
December 27, 2005
Let me commend you for reporting that "the Eastern PA Organizing Project, a faith-based and community group... " rebuked the School District of Philadelphia. Faith groups can and should rebuke secular organizations, for faith groups are better at changing lives than secular organizations. We are accountable to the God who made us, whereas secular organizations leave out God all together. The only hope for improving the educational system in America is impacting the Word of God upon it. Thomas Muldoon, Philadelphia
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
SUPERINTENDENT William R. Hite Jr., saying he had "few options," announced Thursday that the School District will recommend closing 37 schools as part of a plan to establish "a school system that is better run, safer and higher performing. " Calling it "a historic moment," Hite said his recommendations also included changing the grade levels of 23 schools and making other program changes affecting another seven. The total savings for the district could be up to $28 million beginning in 2014-15, he said.
NEWS
April 30, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JUNE 13, 2008, was a Friday - Friday the 13th - a day that lurks in the minds of the superstitious as a time when the evil forces that interfere with our destinies get free reign. Be that as it may, that particular Friday the 13th was bad news for hundreds of African-American parents because it was the day their cherished private school was forced to close. Ivy Leaf School, which began providing an education for African-American students at a reasonable cost from its founding in 1965, succumbed to economic forces beyond its control.
NEWS
April 14, 2016
The Neshaminy school board voted to close two elementary schools Tuesday night as part of a consolidation plan, despite a yearlong campaign by parents at one of the schools to keep it open. At a special meeting that lasted close to two hours, the board voted, 9-0, to close the Lower Southampton School in Feasterville and, 5-4, to close Oliver Heckman School in Langhorne at the end of the year. Heckman parents had argued that the closing would leave the north end of the district, one of the state's largest with 9,000 students, without a grade school.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 28, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
The Camden School District is offering a daylong, five-week summer school this year for as many as 1,000 students from ages 3 to 19, officials said Tuesday. The free program, from July 6 through Aug. 5, will focus on reading and math but also include field trips, sports, and other curriculums. The voluntary program will include breakfast and lunch, and run from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Students can take school buses to get there, officials said. Summer school programs offered by the district in previous years ran only to midday, and provided no transportation.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2016 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
Sitting among his tiny charges, Zachary Duberstein seems more playmate than principal. Yet, behind the childlike smile and exuberance, Duberstein, a self-described "edu-nerd," is quite serious about his goals as Vare-Washington School principal - raising the level of education for its 385 elementary students, and improving satisfaction among the 51 staffers. As a first-time principal this school year, the Passyunk resident immediately instituted changes in the schedule and makeup of the instructional block and bought $10,000 worth of books for intensive novel study.
NEWS
April 28, 2016 | By Jenice Armstrong
AN ELDERLY WOMAN leaned against a fence across from the high school in Wilmington where a 10th-grader reportedly was beaten to death last week by some other students. I couldn't see the senior citizen's face, because she had her head and shoulders down. But as I passed her Monday, the woman wailed, "Lord, what are we going to do?" What are we going to do? Her outpouring of grief and frustration sums up the feelings of a community deep in mourning over the loss of 16-year-old Amy Inita Joyner-Francis of New Castle, Del. The news of her death following a fight in a school restroom sent shock waves through parents and students everywhere.
NEWS
April 27, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
Three days before the Philadelphia School Reform Commission is scheduled to vote on whether to turn three district schools into charters, district officials said they would recommend the controversial changes. Reports posted on the district's website late Monday showed that teams that evaluated the turnaround proposals submitted by providers would urge the SRC to convert the following schools into Renaissance charters in the fall: Jay Cooke in Logan, Samuel Huey in West Philadelphia, and John Wister in Germantown.
NEWS
April 25, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
With her friendly smile, firm handshake, and stylishly oversize glasses, it's hard to imagine Eva Haydu, 17, not fitting in, let alone feeling unbearably sad. Yet not long ago, that was so. She didn't want to go to school. She gave up running track; she was too stressed, too easily tired. She was taken to a hospital because she felt like hurting herself. Some people at Gateway Regional High School "didn't understand how it feels to have anxiety," the junior said. "I was depressed.
NEWS
April 25, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
When a transgender girl graduated in white gown from Springfield Township High School, her parents made an unusual request for two diplomas: one for her, with her new female name, and one for them, with her male birth name. Springfield administrators say they complied without hesitation as they, like many public and private schools, increasingly are being asked to accommodate students who have switched name and gender. The small Montgomery County district, however, has gone a step further than most.
NEWS
April 24, 2016
Two South Jersey high schools and one area Pennsylvania school district are 2016 winners of the prestigous national Green Ribbon environmental awards. The regional winners announced Friday on Earth Day were Egg Harbor Township High School, Triton Regional High School in Runnemede and the Jenkintown School District, according to the U.S. Department of Education. They were among the 47 schools, 15 districts and 11 postsecondary institutions honored for their innovative efforts to reduce environmental impacts and utility costs, improve health and wellness, and ensure effective sustainability education.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
Authorities Friday said they were still investigating the death of a 16-year-old girl who was brutally attacked in a Delaware high-school bathroom. No charges have yet been filed. The victim, identified by the Delaware Department of Justice as Amy Inita Joyner-Francis, was a sophomore at Howard High School of Technology on the 400 block of East 12th Street in Wilmington. In a statement released Friday, prosecutors said they were assisting the Wilmington Police Department's investigation into Joyner-Francis' death.
SPORTS
April 24, 2016 | By Tom Reifsnyder, Staff Writer
Jack Welsh is a quarterback because his older brother, Mike, is a quarterback. Grace Mancini inspired her three younger sisters to run track. It's no surprise some high school sports teams are more like families than just a collection of players. That's because siblings dot the rosters of many local teams. Some of these families, such as the running Mancini sisters at Cardinal O'Hara High School - senior Grace, sophomore twins Eleanor and Elizabeth and freshman Christine - are examples of sisters who share a love for the same sport.
SPORTS
April 24, 2016 | By Marc Narducci, Columnist
The story of Barnegat High School lefthander Jason Groome has become national news, since he could stand to make millions in Major League Baseball's first-year player draft. But he must wait a few weeks to pitch for free for his high school team. It brings up some fascinating questions about the NJSIAA, which declared Groome ineligible for either 30 days or half of his team's scheduled regular-season games. The NJSIAA also ruled that Barnegat had to forfeit the two games that the 6-foot-5, 230-pound lefthander pitched and his team won. Here's the short version of what happened to Groome.
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