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NEWS
June 30, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Small high schools came to Philadelphia in a big way four years ago, when four new ones opened their doors. Less than three miles apart, High School of the Future in Parkside and Science Leadership Academy (SLA) in Center City had vastly different beginnings. Expectations for both were high. Both awarded their first diplomas this month. But although leadership was identified as key to both, one had turmoil at the top and the other had a stable principal. Though both emphasized technology and were given freedom to innovate, one kept a close eye on district standards and the other initially veered from the path.
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Ibrahim Barzak and Dalia Nammari, Associated Press
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - Starting with the new school year in September, Gaza boys and girls in middle and high school will be breaking the law if they study side by side. Gaza's Islamic militant Hamas rulers argue that new legislation, mandating gender separation in schools from age 9, enshrines common practice. But women's activists warned Tuesday that it's another step in what it sees as the Hamas agenda of imposing its fundamentalist world view on Gaza's 1.7 million people. The Gaza rules appear harsh compared to Western practice but are not unusual in parts of the Arab and Muslim world.
FOOD
October 24, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Seventy-five schoolchildren will be learning how to slice onions, cook pasta, roast vegetables, and make dinners like stuffed peppers and homemade tomato soup this fall as My Daughter's Kitchen cooking program continues to expand and evolve in its fourth season. The mission remains the same as when the lessons began with my own daughter: teaching kids to cook simple, healthful, delicious meals on a budget. Thirty-two volunteers - most of them Inquirer readers who wrote in after reading about the program - will begin teaching 15 afterschool classes around the city and across the river in Camden.
NEWS
June 4, 2007
What qualities are important for a new Philadelphia schools chief? We'd like to hear from Philadelphia residents in 150 words or less. E-mail us at suburbanletters@phillynews.com or write us at Regional Commentary Page, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 800 River Rd., Conshohocken, Pa., 19428. All letters must include a full name, home address, and day and evening phone numbers.
NEWS
December 27, 2005
Let me commend you for reporting that "the Eastern PA Organizing Project, a faith-based and community group... " rebuked the School District of Philadelphia. Faith groups can and should rebuke secular organizations, for faith groups are better at changing lives than secular organizations. We are accountable to the God who made us, whereas secular organizations leave out God all together. The only hope for improving the educational system in America is impacting the Word of God upon it. Thomas Muldoon, Philadelphia
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
SUPERINTENDENT William R. Hite Jr., saying he had "few options," announced Thursday that the School District will recommend closing 37 schools as part of a plan to establish "a school system that is better run, safer and higher performing. " Calling it "a historic moment," Hite said his recommendations also included changing the grade levels of 23 schools and making other program changes affecting another seven. The total savings for the district could be up to $28 million beginning in 2014-15, he said.
NEWS
August 9, 2013
THIRTY-ONE days just became seven. If City Council doesn't move on certifying $50 million in proceeds from the sales tax to the School District by next Friday, Superintendent William Hite says he will be unable to open the schools on Sept. 9. So the daily countdown of time remaining in the standoff between the schools and the state and city lawmakers who have fallen short of finding the money the schools need to open has just been shortened. More to the point, Hite has finally introduced the nuclear option.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Michelle Faul, Associated Press
LAGOS, Nigeria - Shaking a finger while cradling an assault rifle, the leader of Nigeria's extremist Islamic sect threatened to burn down more schools and kill teachers. But he denied that his fighters were killing children. In a new video released Saturday, Islamic radical Abubakar Shekau said he "fully supports" attacks on several schools in recent weeks. The U.N. Children's Fund says at least 48 students and seven teachers have been killed since June, with some burned alive this month in a dormitory.
SPORTS
January 15, 2012 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
With three of the league's football-playing schools set to close in June, Catholic League athletic directors on Thursday approved a proposal by football coaches to divide the league into two divisions. As it previously did, the five-team Red Division (Class AAAA) will include Archbishop Ryan, Father Judge, La Salle, Roman Catholic, and St. Joseph's Prep. The six-team Blue Division, a mix of Class AAA and AA schools, will consist of Archbishop Carroll (Class AA), Archbishop Wood (AAA)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
The school counselor whose social-media accounts carried a threatening message addressed to "die-in" protesters outside Lincoln Financial Field on Sunday has been placed on administrative leave while an investigation continues, the school district said. MaryKate Blankenburg, a guidance counselor at the Central Bucks School District, will be paid during the leave, said Melanie Sullivan, Central Bucks School District community relations coordinator. The post, appearing on the Facebook and Twitter accounts of MaryKate Blankenburg, addressed those who planned to protest after the Seattle Seahawks-Philadelphia Eagles game.
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE DISTRICT'S Office of Inspector General has launched an investigation to determine why a North Philadelphia charter school operator paid thousands of dollars to a contractor to paint a school, where maintenance workers claim they did the work. The probe follows a Daily News article published Friday in which current and former employees at Olney Charter High questioned $163,365 in payments that ASPIRA Inc. of Pennsylvania made to Lyon Contracting to paint the school in 2011.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the first time in seven years, the Philadelphia School Reform Commission opened hearings Monday to consider proposals for new charter schools. The wish list for the first of four days of hearings included a community-based school in Germantown for students in grades six through 12, and three K-12 charter schools in neighborhoods across the city, operated by the nonprofit String Theory Schools, that would combine science and the arts. The day's roster also included a high school in Germantown that would focus on careers, a secondary school for at-risk youth that would shore up their academics and equip them for jobs in the region's high-tech economy, and a K-12 school in Center City with a focus on math, science, and technology Benjamin N. Persofsky, president of the founding coalition of the proposed Partnership School, said the K-12 school that the MaST charter in the Far Northeast wants to open in Center City could be crucial for keeping young professionals in the city.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
FIVE charter-school applicants did their best yesterday to impress Philadelphia School District officials as they bid to expand school choice in the city. The applicants were the first of 40 that will outline their plans during public hearings this week before an independent hearing officer and a staffer from the district's Charter Office. The embattled district has not accepted new applications since 2008, but now is required to as part of the city's recently enacted $2 cigarette tax to provide additional funding.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Central Bucks School District and Montgomery County are investigating a threatening message, posted on social media, attributed to the accounts of a Central Bucks High School West employee. The post, appearing on the Facebook and Twitter accounts of MaryKate Blankenburg, a guidance counselor at the high school, addressed potential protesters at the Eagles game Sunday. "If my child cannot get to the Eagles game due to protesters, I will personally SHOOT every one of them. You've been warned idiots!
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Peggy McDaniels walked into the center of the room where she taught Oaklyn second graders more than 50 years ago. "My desk was right here. The piano was here, and that wonderful old clock hung right up there. " McDaniels, 76, paused. "Oh, my goodness," she said, beaming. "This is so cool. " The Berlin Township resident was among a half-dozen retired teachers who gathered Monday at Oaklyn's former Mary A. Finney School as special guests of the borough's holiday luncheon for seniors.
NEWS
December 9, 2014
OVER THE PAST several weeks, citizens across the nation have taken part in a swiftly growing movement that demands change to a system that failed to indict the police officers who killed Mike Brown and Eric Garner. Certainly, the movement did not begin with these two tragic incidents. However, the recent groundswell of activism, particularly youth-led movements, has garnered national attention and has coalesced into a coast-to-coast rallying cry for change. Just this past week, students from across the city participated in and led actions across the city.
SPORTS
December 8, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
After standing for 40 minutes in front of the visitors' bench Saturday at the Pavilion watching 10th-ranked Villanova compete, St. Joseph's coach Phil Martelli said he was "in awe of how they're playing the game and how unselfish they play the game. " "It's a pleasure to watch," he said. "It's not easy to coach against, but it is a pleasure to watch. " The Wildcats might not have had a typical game - a season-high 15 turnovers, a season-low for free-throw percentage, and getting outrebounded for only the second time this season - but their balanced scoring, defense, and experience showed in their 74-46 Big Five victory over the Hawks.
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
The message on the billboard ("Save St. Paul School") outside the St. Paul School in Burlington City has become a rallying cry for a race against time. With the clock ticking, the school faces an uphill battle that will decide whether it opens next school year. The 144-year-old parish school in Burlington County has only about six weeks to raise $250,000 or be forced to close for the 2015-16 school year. "No one wants to see this place go," said principal William Robbins. "We're not going to let go. " The elementary school, which has educated generations of families, has embarked on an emotional appeal to the community.
SPORTS
December 6, 2014 | By Christian Hetrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carnel Harley scored 16 points, and Academy of the New Church edged visiting Perkiomen School, 55-53, Thursday in nonleague boys' basketball. Matt Cotton and Quadir Phillips added 13 points each. The Lions outscored the Panthers, 20-15, in the fourth quarter. Perkiomen's Martynas Simanavicius led all players with 18 points. Paulius Zalys dropped in 11, and Nicholas Posocco had 10. In other nonleague play: Ahmadu Sarnor had a game-high 18 points to lead Collegium Charter to a 64-29 home win over Del-Val Friends.
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