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NEWS
April 23, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF & WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writers dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
TWO PREP-SCHOOL grads led a major illegal-drug ring and planned to monopolize the drug trade in Philadelphia's affluent suburbs, authorities said yesterday. Using confidential informants and "controlled buys," law-enforcement authorities launched a four-month investigation into the operation allegedly spearheaded by former lacrosse players Neil Scott, 25, of Haverford, and Timothy Brooks, 18, of Villanova. "The Main Line takeover project is coming together fast," Brooks wrote in a text message to Scott, according to court papers.
NEWS
June 30, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Small high schools came to Philadelphia in a big way four years ago, when four new ones opened their doors. Less than three miles apart, High School of the Future in Parkside and Science Leadership Academy (SLA) in Center City had vastly different beginnings. Expectations for both were high. Both awarded their first diplomas this month. But although leadership was identified as key to both, one had turmoil at the top and the other had a stable principal. Though both emphasized technology and were given freedom to innovate, one kept a close eye on district standards and the other initially veered from the path.
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Ibrahim Barzak and Dalia Nammari, Associated Press
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - Starting with the new school year in September, Gaza boys and girls in middle and high school will be breaking the law if they study side by side. Gaza's Islamic militant Hamas rulers argue that new legislation, mandating gender separation in schools from age 9, enshrines common practice. But women's activists warned Tuesday that it's another step in what it sees as the Hamas agenda of imposing its fundamentalist world view on Gaza's 1.7 million people. The Gaza rules appear harsh compared to Western practice but are not unusual in parts of the Arab and Muslim world.
NEWS
March 20, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA The influential Philadelphia School Partnership, organized to raise $100 million for high-performing city schools, Tuesday announced it would award $2.6 million more in grants. Its largest gift, $2 million over four years, will support Building 21, a Philadelphia School District high school slated to open in September. The school - which will eventually educate 600 students in the former Ferguson Elementary building on North Seventh Street - will use "competency-based" curriculum that allows students to progress once they show mastery of skills.
NEWS
January 20, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Kristen A. Graham, and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office is conducting a criminal investigation into allegations of widespread cheating among teachers and principals in Philadelphia schools, according to people with knowledge of the inquiry. State prosecutors acted after receiving information from the state Inspector General's Office, which launched its own investigation in 2011. Bruce Beemer, chief of the Criminal Prosecution Section of the Attorney General's Office, declined to comment Friday.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham and Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Philadelphia School District is close to deals on several of its recently closed buildings, officials said Wednesday. Four buyers would scoop up the properties, netting the district about $25 million - well under the target it must meet to cover the city's $50 million outlay that helped schools open on time last fall. If approved by the School Reform Commission, Douglas High School in Port Richmond would be sold to Maritime Academy Charter School. Shaw Middle School in Southwest Philadelphia would go to Mastery Charter School.
NEWS
June 4, 2009 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
WOMELSDORF, Pa. - Infectious-disease investigators began this week the nitty-gritty phase of tracking back a flu outbreak among fourth graders: Who plays kickball with you? Who was coughing? During, say, arts and crafts, did you touch a piece of paper? Pass it? Lick it? A classroom seating chart already showed a cluster of sick kids. But members of the investigative team, most sent here to Berks County from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, needed more definitive evidence.
NEWS
March 8, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposal that would allow West Chester University to withdraw from the state's financially strapped higher-education system could hit students and parents in the pocketbook, the system's chancellor warned Thursday. Were West Chester to become a "state-related" school like Pennsylvania State University, it would most certainly mean higher tuition, fees, and other costs, said Frank T. Brogan, chancellor of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education. Students at Penn State's main campus pay $26,362 annually in tuition, fees, and room and board, compared with about $17,000 annually on average at the 14 state system universities.
NEWS
June 4, 2007
What qualities are important for a new Philadelphia schools chief? We'd like to hear from Philadelphia residents in 150 words or less. E-mail us at suburbanletters@phillynews.com or write us at Regional Commentary Page, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 800 River Rd., Conshohocken, Pa., 19428. All letters must include a full name, home address, and day and evening phone numbers.
NEWS
December 27, 2005
Let me commend you for reporting that "the Eastern PA Organizing Project, a faith-based and community group... " rebuked the School District of Philadelphia. Faith groups can and should rebuke secular organizations, for faith groups are better at changing lives than secular organizations. We are accountable to the God who made us, whereas secular organizations leave out God all together. The only hope for improving the educational system in America is impacting the Word of God upon it. Thomas Muldoon, Philadelphia
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NEWS
April 23, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF & WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writers dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
TWO PREP-SCHOOL grads led a major illegal-drug ring and planned to monopolize the drug trade in Philadelphia's affluent suburbs, authorities said yesterday. Using confidential informants and "controlled buys," law-enforcement authorities launched a four-month investigation into the operation allegedly spearheaded by former lacrosse players Neil Scott, 25, of Haverford, and Timothy Brooks, 18, of Villanova. "The Main Line takeover project is coming together fast," Brooks wrote in a text message to Scott, according to court papers.
NEWS
April 23, 2014
THE Philadelphia Federation of Teachers have started a campaign seeking return of the school district to local control. You can hardly blame them. The teachers union is locked in mortal combat over a new contract with the School Reform Commission, the state-created board that has overseen the schools since 2001. The SRC is demanding concessions from the union over pay, benefits and important work rules, and has gone to the state Supreme Court for the right to impose them. So, it's no surprise that the PFT would prefer to have anyone other than the SRC running the district.
NEWS
April 23, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
THE COOLEST SCHOOL in Philadelphia has a golden telescope on the roof, where everyone from kindergarten through 12th grade can watch explosions on the surface of the sun. Inside, all 1,327 students work on iPads and computers, and exercise in an all-Wii gym with Wii Fitness, Wii Sports and "Dance Dance Revolution. " Students choose a favorite TV show or movie scene, re-enact it, film it, then edit it in the video lab. Others design sneakers or model airplanes on their computers, then physically build them in a 3-D printer.
NEWS
April 23, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
PARENTS WHO arrived to pick up children at the Walter D. Palmer Leadership Learning Partners Charter School yesterday were shocked to learn that the Philadelphia School District wants to revoke the school's charter. "It's a good school," said Kareem Jefferson, who picked up his two children at the school on 6th Street near Poplar, in Northern Liberties. "I recommend this school over any other public school in this school district," Jefferson said. An hour earlier, the district had announced that the School Reform Commission will consider revoking the school's charter at its meeting tomorrow.
NEWS
April 23, 2014 | By Carolyn Davis and Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writers
The investigation into a Main Line high school drug ring began months ago. Police arrested one alleged ringleader in February. But school administrators said this week that they didn't know about the probe until hours before authorities Monday announced the arrests of 11 people and unveiled a cache of seized drugs, cash, and weapons. The admission underscores what has become a frustration among some law enforcement agencies vying to root out networks that peddle to teens: Collaborating with schools during investigations can be difficult - or even counterproductive.
NEWS
April 23, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's Masterman High School once again topped U.S. News & World Report's annual ranking of Pennsylvania schools, with a number of suburban high schools rounding out the top 10. New Hope-Solebury in Bucks County surged into the No. 3 spot ahead of academic powerhouses Conestoga (fifth) and Lower Merion (15th). Northwest Pennsylvania Collegiate Academy in Erie was ranked No. 2. "I just could not be more thrilled," said New Hope-Solebury Superintendent Raymond J. Boccuti.
NEWS
April 21, 2014
The drama created by the Philadelphia School District's attempt to force new work rules on the teachers' union doesn't mean the inequitable funding that hamstrings schools across Pennsylvania is any less of a problem. In fact, there's a good case for making school funding the top issue in this year's governor's race. Voters should place the fiscal shape of local schools in context with Gov. Corbett's business tax breaks, which have yet to be matched by job creation. For nearly two decades, there was little rhyme or reason in the way state education dollars were doled out. But in 2006, the General Assembly authorized a Costing-Out Study to determine how much each school district would need to meet uniform academic standards.
NEWS
April 21, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
To most, the Franklin Institute might be known for its big walk-through replica of the heart, blockbuster shows, and, starting this summer, a new wing with a Big Brain. But more quietly, the Franklin, in partnership with three other U.S. institutions, has embarked on an ambitious mission to help open science high schools in Cairo and science centers around the globe. Funded in part with a $25 million grant from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), an arm of the federal government, two schools not far from Giza have opened so far: the 6th of October STEM School for Boys, and the Maadi STEM Schools for Girls, both boarding schools, with a combined 550 students.
NEWS
April 20, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two South Jersey charter schools are appealing state decisions that would force their closure by the end of this school year. The D.U.E. Season Charter School in Camden and the Renaissance Regional Leadership Charter School in Browns Mills both received notification last month that their charters would not be renewed because of academic deficiencies. In appeals being processed by the state's courts and being sent to state Education Commissioner David Hespe, the schools argue that they were judged unfairly and that their achievements were underrated.
NEWS
April 20, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
OVERBROOK PARK Toney Goins and his mother remember scrambling to find a black cloak and thin mask on the eve of his debut performance in front of his sixth-grade English class. That performance, they recall, piqued Goins' interest in acting and unveiled a talent that has brought Goins to a great height. He will attend the Juilliard School for the performing arts in New York this fall, a dramatic change from the Overbrook Park section of Philadelphia. "He's going to be a professional actor - unless he chooses not to," said Ozzy Jones, who coached Goins as he prepared for the Juilliard auditions.
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