CollectionsSchools
IN THE NEWS

Schools

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 30, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Small high schools came to Philadelphia in a big way four years ago, when four new ones opened their doors. Less than three miles apart, High School of the Future in Parkside and Science Leadership Academy (SLA) in Center City had vastly different beginnings. Expectations for both were high. Both awarded their first diplomas this month. But although leadership was identified as key to both, one had turmoil at the top and the other had a stable principal. Though both emphasized technology and were given freedom to innovate, one kept a close eye on district standards and the other initially veered from the path.
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Ibrahim Barzak and Dalia Nammari, Associated Press
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - Starting with the new school year in September, Gaza boys and girls in middle and high school will be breaking the law if they study side by side. Gaza's Islamic militant Hamas rulers argue that new legislation, mandating gender separation in schools from age 9, enshrines common practice. But women's activists warned Tuesday that it's another step in what it sees as the Hamas agenda of imposing its fundamentalist world view on Gaza's 1.7 million people. The Gaza rules appear harsh compared to Western practice but are not unusual in parts of the Arab and Muslim world.
NEWS
June 4, 2007
What qualities are important for a new Philadelphia schools chief? We'd like to hear from Philadelphia residents in 150 words or less. E-mail us at suburbanletters@phillynews.com or write us at Regional Commentary Page, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 800 River Rd., Conshohocken, Pa., 19428. All letters must include a full name, home address, and day and evening phone numbers.
NEWS
December 27, 2005
Let me commend you for reporting that "the Eastern PA Organizing Project, a faith-based and community group... " rebuked the School District of Philadelphia. Faith groups can and should rebuke secular organizations, for faith groups are better at changing lives than secular organizations. We are accountable to the God who made us, whereas secular organizations leave out God all together. The only hope for improving the educational system in America is impacting the Word of God upon it. Thomas Muldoon, Philadelphia
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
SUPERINTENDENT William R. Hite Jr., saying he had "few options," announced Thursday that the School District will recommend closing 37 schools as part of a plan to establish "a school system that is better run, safer and higher performing. " Calling it "a historic moment," Hite said his recommendations also included changing the grade levels of 23 schools and making other program changes affecting another seven. The total savings for the district could be up to $28 million beginning in 2014-15, he said.
NEWS
October 1, 2011 | By Jay Reeves, Associated Press
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - Hispanic students have started vanishing from Alabama public schools after a court ruling that upheld the state's tough new law on illegal immigration. Education officials say scores of immigrant families have withdrawn their children from classes or kept them home this week, afraid that sending the children to school would draw attention from authorities. There are no precise statewide numbers. But several districts with large immigrant enrollments reported a sudden exodus of children of Hispanic parents, some of whom told officials they would leave the state to avoid trouble with the law, which requires schools to check students' immigration status.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Michelle Faul, Associated Press
LAGOS, Nigeria - Shaking a finger while cradling an assault rifle, the leader of Nigeria's extremist Islamic sect threatened to burn down more schools and kill teachers. But he denied that his fighters were killing children. In a new video released Saturday, Islamic radical Abubakar Shekau said he "fully supports" attacks on several schools in recent weeks. The U.N. Children's Fund says at least 48 students and seven teachers have been killed since June, with some burned alive this month in a dormitory.
NEWS
April 30, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
IN 1939, a 6-year-old boy moved to Detroit with his working-class parents - Lithuanian Jewish immigrants - and walked into the remarkable engine that propelled so much of America's prosperity in the 20th century, his neighborhood public school. That kid, Eli Broad, graduated from Detroit Central High School in 1951 and went on to become one of the world's richest people, a billionaire who made his fortune first in the post-World War II housing boom and later in insurance. Today, the 79-year-old Broad (it rhymes with "road")
NEWS
August 9, 2013
THIRTY-ONE days just became seven. If City Council doesn't move on certifying $50 million in proceeds from the sales tax to the School District by next Friday, Superintendent William Hite says he will be unable to open the schools on Sept. 9. So the daily countdown of time remaining in the standoff between the schools and the state and city lawmakers who have fallen short of finding the money the schools need to open has just been shortened. More to the point, Hite has finally introduced the nuclear option.
NEWS
September 8, 2010 | Inquirer Staff Report
Mayor Nutter, himself a product of a parochial education, was on hand today to greet youngsters at a Catholic school in North Philadelphia as the 2010-11 academic year began for the 72,000 students attending schools operated by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. It also was the first day of school for Catholic schools in South Jersey. Nutter, a graduate of Transfiguration of Our Lord Catholic Elementary School in West Philadelphia and St. Joseph's Prep, greeted students at Incarnation of Our Lord Elementary School, 425 W. Lindley Ave., in Olney.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 24, 2016
ISSUE | PHILA. SCHOOLS Safety needed Allegations that a Benjamin Franklin High School police officer assaulted a student for trying to use the bathroom without a hall pass ("School officer is accused of assault," May 12) are another troubling result of the lack of resources available to the Philadelphia schools that are most in need. Ben Franklin educates some of the city's most economically disadvantaged students, with nearly a quarter receiving special-education services. Yet glaring shortfalls in state funding mean that the school lacks the resources to improve the climate and serve these children by hiring enough counselors and other crucial support staff.
SPORTS
May 24, 2016 | By Aaron Carter, STAFF WRITER
Culver Academy goaltender Matt Schmidt was pinned deep in his own zone with a Haverford School defender closing quickly when he launched the ball up for grabs in the third quarter of the Inter-Ac Challenge championship Sunday at Villanova. When it finally returned from orbit, the ball bounced off a Haverford School defender's stick and right to Culver's Brodie Gillespie, who flipped it to Wheaton Jackoboice, who scored the final Culver goal in its thrilling, 8-7 victory against the Fords.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2016 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Marta is a charming and respectful 14-year-old with long curly brown hair and hazel eyes. Polite and friendly to everyone, she becomes more outgoing when she is in situations where she feels comfortable. She loves animals, spending time with her friends, and any type of technology she can get her hands on. Marta enjoys going to school and is proud of the many A's she earns. Her favorite subjects are science and social studies. College is in her plans for the future, but she hasn't decided yet what she wants to study.
NEWS
May 24, 2016
IMAGINE A FEW students whose year-end report cards show so many failing grades that the teacher recommends that they not graduate. Now suppose the principal intervened and said, "Not so fast, let's give them another chance. " This would not be good for the students, or for teachers, or for the school system, and it would be bad for education overall. In a way, that's what happened last week during the process of renewing a handful of charter schools, during a meeting of the School Reform Commission.
NEWS
May 21, 2016
ISSUE | IN GOD WE TRUST Teddy disapproved As one who believes in God, I must take President Theodore Roosevelt's position toward the national motto being placed on our currency ("Not a problem," Tuesday). Roosevelt, who had been a Sunday school teacher, strongly believed in the separation of church and state. When he took office after President William McKinley's assassination, he deliberately did not swear on a Bible, and he did not believe that currency should bear the "In God We Trust" motto because money is used to buy worldly goods and services.
NEWS
May 21, 2016
ISSUE | SODA TAX Unions need to stand together against levy Philadelphia unions that are supporting Mayor Kenney's regressive 3-cents-an-ounce sugary-drinks tax don't have all the facts. The Teamsters stand against the tax because we would lose as many as 2,000 members' jobs if it passes, which would be a devastating blow. As president of the Pennsylvania Conference of Teamsters and vice president of the Eastern Region, I support every union in this state. If any government or corporate entity attacked a core industry of another union the way Philadelphia is attacking the beverage industry - to the Teamsters' detriment - we would be at their side.
NEWS
May 21, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
A Philadelphia nun convicted of driving while intoxicated will not get her teaching job back this school year, archdiocese officials say. A substitute will continue to teach Sister Kimberly A. Miller's theology class at Little Flower High School for Girls in Philadelphia, spokesman Ken Gavin said. "A decision was made to stay with the substitute in these few remaining weeks for the sake of continuity," Gavin said in a statement. The school year ends June 17. Her teaching status for the 2016-17 school year will be decided later by the Office of Catholic Education.
NEWS
May 21, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
Two charter school operators that were expected to lose two schools each, due to various academic and governance shortcomings, instead received temporary lifelines at Thursday night's School Reform Commission meeting. Aspira Inc., the North Philadelphia nonprofit dedicated to educating Latino children, was given one week to persuade the SRC to allow it to continue managing two of its struggling schools. Leading Aspira's effort is former City Solicitor Ken Trujillo, who was hired recently and pledged during the meeting that he would answer all outstanding questions about Olney Charter High School and John B. Stetson Charter School.
NEWS
May 20, 2016
ISSUE | TRANSGENDER RIGHTS Local schools should make their rules The Obama administration issued a directive Friday to all public schools to grant transgender students equal access to all activities and facilities ("U.S. Call for Transgender Rights," Saturday). School districts that do not comply could face a loss of federal funds. This directive will permit transgender students to use the restrooms of students of the natural-born opposite sex. Again, the federal government is delving into the operation of local public schools.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|