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NEWS
June 30, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Small high schools came to Philadelphia in a big way four years ago, when four new ones opened their doors. Less than three miles apart, High School of the Future in Parkside and Science Leadership Academy (SLA) in Center City had vastly different beginnings. Expectations for both were high. Both awarded their first diplomas this month. But although leadership was identified as key to both, one had turmoil at the top and the other had a stable principal. Though both emphasized technology and were given freedom to innovate, one kept a close eye on district standards and the other initially veered from the path.
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Ibrahim Barzak and Dalia Nammari, Associated Press
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - Starting with the new school year in September, Gaza boys and girls in middle and high school will be breaking the law if they study side by side. Gaza's Islamic militant Hamas rulers argue that new legislation, mandating gender separation in schools from age 9, enshrines common practice. But women's activists warned Tuesday that it's another step in what it sees as the Hamas agenda of imposing its fundamentalist world view on Gaza's 1.7 million people. The Gaza rules appear harsh compared to Western practice but are not unusual in parts of the Arab and Muslim world.
SPORTS
August 3, 2016 | By Marc Narducci, STAFF WRITER
NEWPORT, R.I. - With the Big 12 Conference's recent vote to pursue expansion, there will be plenty of schools more than willing to be part of the process, including Temple. In the past, Temple athletic director Patrick Kraft has declined to discuss the situation publicly for fear of alienating his current home, the American Athletic Conference. However, as the football teams meet for media day on Tuesday, this is a topic that is being openly discussed and one that AAC commissioner Mike Aresco is expected to address.
NEWS
June 4, 2007
What qualities are important for a new Philadelphia schools chief? We'd like to hear from Philadelphia residents in 150 words or less. E-mail us at suburbanletters@phillynews.com or write us at Regional Commentary Page, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 800 River Rd., Conshohocken, Pa., 19428. All letters must include a full name, home address, and day and evening phone numbers.
NEWS
December 27, 2005
Let me commend you for reporting that "the Eastern PA Organizing Project, a faith-based and community group... " rebuked the School District of Philadelphia. Faith groups can and should rebuke secular organizations, for faith groups are better at changing lives than secular organizations. We are accountable to the God who made us, whereas secular organizations leave out God all together. The only hope for improving the educational system in America is impacting the Word of God upon it. Thomas Muldoon, Philadelphia
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
SUPERINTENDENT William R. Hite Jr., saying he had "few options," announced Thursday that the School District will recommend closing 37 schools as part of a plan to establish "a school system that is better run, safer and higher performing. " Calling it "a historic moment," Hite said his recommendations also included changing the grade levels of 23 schools and making other program changes affecting another seven. The total savings for the district could be up to $28 million beginning in 2014-15, he said.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
James Crisfield knew that Wissahickon High School scored very well on the latest School Performance Profile, but on Wednesday, the superintendent was surprised to learn that the school was No. 1 in Pennsylvania. While Crisfield called it "a nice honor," he said the 101.8 SPP score, weighted heavily by standardized tests, isn't necessarily the best indicator of student achievement. Lynne Blair, principal at the Montgomery County school, was more enthusiastic. "It is very exciting!"
NEWS
September 8, 2010 | Inquirer Staff Report
Mayor Nutter, himself a product of a parochial education, was on hand today to greet youngsters at a Catholic school in North Philadelphia as the 2010-11 academic year began for the 72,000 students attending schools operated by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. It also was the first day of school for Catholic schools in South Jersey. Nutter, a graduate of Transfiguration of Our Lord Catholic Elementary School in West Philadelphia and St. Joseph's Prep, greeted students at Incarnation of Our Lord Elementary School, 425 W. Lindley Ave., in Olney.
NEWS
April 14, 2016
The Neshaminy school board voted to close two elementary schools Tuesday night as part of a consolidation plan, despite a yearlong campaign by parents at one of the schools to keep it open. At a special meeting that lasted close to two hours, the board voted, 9-0, to close the Lower Southampton School in Feasterville and, 5-4, to close Oliver Heckman School in Langhorne at the end of the year. Heckman parents had argued that the closing would leave the north end of the district, one of the state's largest with 9,000 students, without a grade school.
NEWS
March 3, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Students, parents, teachers and administrators are pleading their cases before the School Reform Commission as the committee holds its final hearings on the proposed closing of nine schools. Advocates for the schools were given an hour to speak before the commission at the day-long session that is scheduled to continue today through 7 p.m. The Philadelphia School District has recommended the closings and a grade realignment at 17 other schools to cope with declining enrollment, aging facilities and a dire financial situation.
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NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
Hydration stations have arrived in the School District of Philadelphia. The stations - water fountains equipped with filters and separate faucets from which to fill water bottles - will be up and running at 43 schools when classes start next month, school officials announced Monday. Each school is receiving at least three hydration stations, and plans call for the remainder of the district's more than 170 schools to receive stations by the end of the school year, spokesman Kevin Geary said.
NEWS
August 17, 2016
Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes made waves in 1977 with their hit record, "This Time It's For Real. " Superintendent William H. Hite Jr. may be humming a similar tune when Philadelphia schools open in three weeks. He's much more certain that the district won't have to beg for another large infusion of cash to make it through the school year. "While we continue to have work to do, the Philadelphia School District begins the 2016-17 school year more optimistic than we have been in years as we work toward our goal of great schools close to where children live," Hite told the Inquirer Editorial Board.
SPORTS
August 17, 2016 | By Rick O'Brien and Phil Anastasia, STAFF WRITERS
High school football practice in Pennsylvania and South Jersey officially started Monday, with the sound of pads hitting pads in steamy conditions. "I think the kids are happy to get going for real," La Salle coach John Steinmetz said. "It's a grind, but they enjoy getting out there and competing. " The first whistle blew just before 8:30 a.m. at Cinnaminson as the team tried to beat the heat with an early-morning practice. "Just glad to get out here and get to work," Cinnaminson coach Mario Patrizi said.
NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
A group of Camden residents who want the city's school board to be an elected body rather than one appointed by the mayor suffered a setback Monday when a judge dismissed their lawsuit against the school district. The suit, filed in April in Superior Court in Camden, asked that city residents be allowed to vote on whether to appoint or elect members of the board. It also argued that the question should have gone before voters in April 2014, as specified in 2010 legislation that ended the state's takeover of the City of Camden.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Keith Zakarin has a tough argument to make, but that is, after all, what lawyers are paid to do. Zakarin is a partner at Center City's Duane Morris, where he chairs a practice group that represents more than a hundred career schools and colleges and industry groups. The firm is one of a handful nationwide that have made the sector a thriving, profitable practice. Its clients are largely vocational and occupational training programs; they teach a variety of trades and skills from cosmetology to nursing to criminal justice, among many others, with degree programs of up to four years.
NEWS
August 16, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
Thirteen years ago, arthritis began creeping into Jeffry Lohr's spine, bit by bit stiffening it until he was unable to bend over. That would be a life-changer for anyone, but for a master woodworker, it augured the end of the art and craft that had defined him and brought him national renown. The disease progressed to the point that if a nail tumbled from his worktable, he could not pick it up. If there was any saving grace, it was that his hands were spared. So, with medication to keep the pain at bay, the 63-year-old Limerick craftsman has continued creating the traditional furniture that is his signature, as well as free-form pieces that incorporate a tree's edges.
NEWS
August 13, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
The former athletic director of the Coatesville Area School District was sentenced Thursday to at least two months in prison for stealing $15,000 from the financially struggling school system. James Donato, who resigned three years ago after school officials discovered racist and sexist text messages about students and staff sent between him and the former superintendent, pleaded guilty to felony theft and conflict of interest charges on June 20. He had been facing 139 misdemeanor and felony charges.
NEWS
August 12, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, STAFF WRITER
The cash-strapped Philadelphia School District will begin trolling for more tax dollars from city properties that have been significantly under valued, officials announced Tuesday. The district will seek proposals from law firms, real estate appraisers and other professionals to help identify properties that are assessed at least $1 million under their actual value and appeal those assessments. District officials aren't sure how much money the effort will bring in, but said the district needs all tax revenue to which it is entitled.
NEWS
August 11, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
An affiliate of the Goldenberg Group of Blue Bell has acquired the World Communications Charter School's classroom building on South Broad Street from the charter operator, which will remain at the property as a tenant. The affiliate, Broad Street South Associates LP, paid $10 million on June 28 for the 46,400-square-foot property at 512 S. Broad St., according to records filed with the city. Goldenberg operations chief Seth Shapiro said in a statement on Tuesday that the property was purchased as a long-term investment and that the charter school has an option to continue leasing the building "for several years.
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