CollectionsSchools
IN THE NEWS

Schools

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
James Crisfield knew that Wissahickon High School scored very well on the latest School Performance Profile, but on Wednesday, the superintendent was surprised to learn that the school was No. 1 in Pennsylvania. While Crisfield called it "a nice honor," he said the 101.8 SPP score, weighted heavily by standardized tests, isn't necessarily the best indicator of student achievement. Lynne Blair, principal at the Montgomery County school, was more enthusiastic. "It is very exciting!"
NEWS
June 30, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Small high schools came to Philadelphia in a big way four years ago, when four new ones opened their doors. Less than three miles apart, High School of the Future in Parkside and Science Leadership Academy (SLA) in Center City had vastly different beginnings. Expectations for both were high. Both awarded their first diplomas this month. But although leadership was identified as key to both, one had turmoil at the top and the other had a stable principal. Though both emphasized technology and were given freedom to innovate, one kept a close eye on district standards and the other initially veered from the path.
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Ibrahim Barzak and Dalia Nammari, Associated Press
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - Starting with the new school year in September, Gaza boys and girls in middle and high school will be breaking the law if they study side by side. Gaza's Islamic militant Hamas rulers argue that new legislation, mandating gender separation in schools from age 9, enshrines common practice. But women's activists warned Tuesday that it's another step in what it sees as the Hamas agenda of imposing its fundamentalist world view on Gaza's 1.7 million people. The Gaza rules appear harsh compared to Western practice but are not unusual in parts of the Arab and Muslim world.
NEWS
June 4, 2007
What qualities are important for a new Philadelphia schools chief? We'd like to hear from Philadelphia residents in 150 words or less. E-mail us at suburbanletters@phillynews.com or write us at Regional Commentary Page, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 800 River Rd., Conshohocken, Pa., 19428. All letters must include a full name, home address, and day and evening phone numbers.
NEWS
December 27, 2005
Let me commend you for reporting that "the Eastern PA Organizing Project, a faith-based and community group... " rebuked the School District of Philadelphia. Faith groups can and should rebuke secular organizations, for faith groups are better at changing lives than secular organizations. We are accountable to the God who made us, whereas secular organizations leave out God all together. The only hope for improving the educational system in America is impacting the Word of God upon it. Thomas Muldoon, Philadelphia
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
SUPERINTENDENT William R. Hite Jr., saying he had "few options," announced Thursday that the School District will recommend closing 37 schools as part of a plan to establish "a school system that is better run, safer and higher performing. " Calling it "a historic moment," Hite said his recommendations also included changing the grade levels of 23 schools and making other program changes affecting another seven. The total savings for the district could be up to $28 million beginning in 2014-15, he said.
NEWS
September 8, 2010 | Inquirer Staff Report
Mayor Nutter, himself a product of a parochial education, was on hand today to greet youngsters at a Catholic school in North Philadelphia as the 2010-11 academic year began for the 72,000 students attending schools operated by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. It also was the first day of school for Catholic schools in South Jersey. Nutter, a graduate of Transfiguration of Our Lord Catholic Elementary School in West Philadelphia and St. Joseph's Prep, greeted students at Incarnation of Our Lord Elementary School, 425 W. Lindley Ave., in Olney.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Michelle Faul, Associated Press
LAGOS, Nigeria - Shaking a finger while cradling an assault rifle, the leader of Nigeria's extremist Islamic sect threatened to burn down more schools and kill teachers. But he denied that his fighters were killing children. In a new video released Saturday, Islamic radical Abubakar Shekau said he "fully supports" attacks on several schools in recent weeks. The U.N. Children's Fund says at least 48 students and seven teachers have been killed since June, with some burned alive this month in a dormitory.
NEWS
August 9, 2013
THIRTY-ONE days just became seven. If City Council doesn't move on certifying $50 million in proceeds from the sales tax to the School District by next Friday, Superintendent William Hite says he will be unable to open the schools on Sept. 9. So the daily countdown of time remaining in the standoff between the schools and the state and city lawmakers who have fallen short of finding the money the schools need to open has just been shortened. More to the point, Hite has finally introduced the nuclear option.
SPORTS
January 15, 2012 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
With three of the league's football-playing schools set to close in June, Catholic League athletic directors on Thursday approved a proposal by football coaches to divide the league into two divisions. As it previously did, the five-team Red Division (Class AAAA) will include Archbishop Ryan, Father Judge, La Salle, Roman Catholic, and St. Joseph's Prep. The six-team Blue Division, a mix of Class AAA and AA schools, will consist of Archbishop Carroll (Class AA), Archbishop Wood (AAA)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 6, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
Philadelphia Archbishop Charles J. Chaput said Thursday that the Faith in the Future Foundation's management of archdiocesan high schools has been so successful that both sides have agreed to an early contract extension. The announcement, which the archdiocese called a highlight of Catholic Schools Week, was made at Archbishop Ryan High School in the Far Northeast - one of the 17 archdiocesan secondary schools in the five-county archdiocese that enroll 13,300 students. "We weren't sure if it was going to work, so we entered into a contract for a limited time in order to test it," the archbishop said.
NEWS
February 6, 2016 | By Michael Boren and Melanie Burney, STAFF WRITERS
The bang outside her home sounded like thunder. When Janet Hickman looked out, she saw a school bus tipped over on its side, with children sliding out its back door, and one girl limping and crying. The vehicle that struck the bus had smoke coming out of it, she said. "It was scary," said Hickman, 68, who lives in a trailer park near the accident site. Calling their findings preliminary, New Jersey State Police said the small bus - eastbound in Fairfield Township, just outside Bridgeton - was hit by a westbound black Toyota Rav4 SUV that veered into its path.
NEWS
February 5, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
In the years before the interstate highway system was built, coast-to-coast car travel could be exhausting. But when Elizabeth Thorpe Donahue accompanied her husband, Frank L., from South Jersey to his 1942 Navy assignment in California, they drove. And when he was assigned to operate a patrol boat off Hawaii, her son Frank L. Jr. said, "already pregnant with my sister, she drove alone back to New Jersey. " On Friday, Jan. 29, Mrs. Donahue, 95, of Medford, a fourth-grade public-school teacher in Cherry Hill from 1959 until she retired in 1986, died at the retirement community Medford Leas.
NEWS
February 5, 2016
A Chester County Court judge has upheld criminal charges against the former superintendent of the Coatesville Area School District on theft, conflict of interest, and other charges in a ruling filed Tuesday. An attorney for Richard Como had asked the judge to throw out the case against the former superintendent eight months ago, claiming lack of evidence. Judge Thomas G. Gavin on Tuesday threw out three counts -- one for theft by unlawful taking, one for attempted theft by deception, and one for conflict of interest.
NEWS
February 5, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, STAFF WRITER
A suit filed by a Main Line attorney argues that the Lower Merion School District, one of the region's wealthiest and most highly regarded, has misled the public about its finances and should remit its $55 million surplus to taxpayers. The class-action suit, filed Monday in Montgomery County Court by Arthur Wolk, a lawyer who lives in Gladwyne, seeks a long list of remedies, including a five-year moratorium on tax increases. It says that the district has misappropriated funds and that its large surplus was "ill-begotten.
NEWS
February 5, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas and Kristen A. Graham, STAFF WRITERS
Education activist Susan Gobreski will lead the city's charge in setting up community schools throughout Philadelphia, Mayor Kenney announced Wednesday. Gobreski, who most recently was executive director of the advocacy group Education Voters of Pennsylvania, was appointed community schools director. "Susan's long-standing commitment to improving our city's schools, coupled with her expertise in community engagement, made her an obvious choice for this role," Kenney said in a statement.
NEWS
February 5, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
Todd Kimmel just pocketed something he never imagined he'd possess: the mayor's cellphone number and personal email address. Kimmel, principal of Hackett Elementary in Kensington, was part of a group of city principals who sat down with Mayor Kenney after school Wednesday at City Hall, the first in a regular series of meetings Kenney plans to hold with school leaders. During his mayoral campaign, Kenney said that if elected, he would regularly seek out the wisdom of rank-and-file educators who know their schools and communities best.
NEWS
February 4, 2016
The theft of a school police officer's gun prompted police on Tuesday to place the Kensington Urban Education Academy on lockdown. The officer kept the gun in his car - but forgot to lock the car, said Officer Christine O'Brien, a police spokeswoman. But the officer also wasn't sure if he locked his car overnight at his home, so investigators hadn't determined whether the theft occurred outside his home or outside the high school. Police searched the school, but the officer's gun was not recovered, O'Brien said.
NEWS
February 4, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis and Justine McDaniel, STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Wolf said Tuesday that he will propose boosting funding for public education by $200 million when he unveils his budget next week for the new fiscal year. The problem: he and the Republican-controlled legislature have yet to reach agreement on education spending - or even a final budget, for that matter - for this fiscal year. Speaking at an elementary school in the struggling Reading school district, Wolf, who is to give his budget address to a joint session of the legislature next Tuesday, said education funding remains a top priority for his administration.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|