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NEWS
June 30, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Small high schools came to Philadelphia in a big way four years ago, when four new ones opened their doors. Less than three miles apart, High School of the Future in Parkside and Science Leadership Academy (SLA) in Center City had vastly different beginnings. Expectations for both were high. Both awarded their first diplomas this month. But although leadership was identified as key to both, one had turmoil at the top and the other had a stable principal. Though both emphasized technology and were given freedom to innovate, one kept a close eye on district standards and the other initially veered from the path.
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Ibrahim Barzak and Dalia Nammari, Associated Press
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - Starting with the new school year in September, Gaza boys and girls in middle and high school will be breaking the law if they study side by side. Gaza's Islamic militant Hamas rulers argue that new legislation, mandating gender separation in schools from age 9, enshrines common practice. But women's activists warned Tuesday that it's another step in what it sees as the Hamas agenda of imposing its fundamentalist world view on Gaza's 1.7 million people. The Gaza rules appear harsh compared to Western practice but are not unusual in parts of the Arab and Muslim world.
NEWS
April 30, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
IN 1939, a 6-year-old boy moved to Detroit with his working-class parents - Lithuanian Jewish immigrants - and walked into the remarkable engine that propelled so much of America's prosperity in the 20th century, his neighborhood public school. That kid, Eli Broad, graduated from Detroit Central High School in 1951 and went on to become one of the world's richest people, a billionaire who made his fortune first in the post-World War II housing boom and later in insurance. Today, the 79-year-old Broad (it rhymes with "road")
NEWS
March 11, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
JAMES GERARD BECKER III, whose friends called him Ray or Jib, would have gotten such a kick out of the Eagles quarterback trade, his family said Tuesday night. The Kensington CAPA High School senior "would have had a field day with that," said his uncle Tony Becker, standing in a small kitchen in his brother's house. The teen's father, James G. Becker Jr., chimed in: "He wanted to work in sports any way he could get into it. " But his son's career dream was dashed Thursday when he was accidentally shot by classmate Ivan Oberholtzer inside Oberholtzer's bedroom in Kensington, a police spokeswoman said Tuesday night.
NEWS
March 18, 2015
THOUGH "City Council budget hearings" is usually a phrase to excite only the most wonkish of citizens, every year there is at least one issue that generates more heat among the populace. In recent years, that issue is usually money for schools, and what the best way is to raise that money. This year, that issue is likely to generate enough heat to make us forget this past winter, since Mayor Nutter's budget proposal calls for raising property taxes 9.3 percent to generate $105 million for the schools.
NEWS
June 4, 2007
What qualities are important for a new Philadelphia schools chief? We'd like to hear from Philadelphia residents in 150 words or less. E-mail us at suburbanletters@phillynews.com or write us at Regional Commentary Page, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 800 River Rd., Conshohocken, Pa., 19428. All letters must include a full name, home address, and day and evening phone numbers.
NEWS
December 27, 2005
Let me commend you for reporting that "the Eastern PA Organizing Project, a faith-based and community group... " rebuked the School District of Philadelphia. Faith groups can and should rebuke secular organizations, for faith groups are better at changing lives than secular organizations. We are accountable to the God who made us, whereas secular organizations leave out God all together. The only hope for improving the educational system in America is impacting the Word of God upon it. Thomas Muldoon, Philadelphia
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
SUPERINTENDENT William R. Hite Jr., saying he had "few options," announced Thursday that the School District will recommend closing 37 schools as part of a plan to establish "a school system that is better run, safer and higher performing. " Calling it "a historic moment," Hite said his recommendations also included changing the grade levels of 23 schools and making other program changes affecting another seven. The total savings for the district could be up to $28 million beginning in 2014-15, he said.
FOOD
October 24, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Seventy-five schoolchildren will be learning how to slice onions, cook pasta, roast vegetables, and make dinners like stuffed peppers and homemade tomato soup this fall as My Daughter's Kitchen cooking program continues to expand and evolve in its fourth season. The mission remains the same as when the lessons began with my own daughter: teaching kids to cook simple, healthful, delicious meals on a budget. Thirty-two volunteers - most of them Inquirer readers who wrote in after reading about the program - will begin teaching 15 afterschool classes around the city and across the river in Camden.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Michelle Faul, Associated Press
LAGOS, Nigeria - Shaking a finger while cradling an assault rifle, the leader of Nigeria's extremist Islamic sect threatened to burn down more schools and kill teachers. But he denied that his fighters were killing children. In a new video released Saturday, Islamic radical Abubakar Shekau said he "fully supports" attacks on several schools in recent weeks. The U.N. Children's Fund says at least 48 students and seven teachers have been killed since June, with some burned alive this month in a dormitory.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Huizhong Wu, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan said Friday that Pennsylvania does the worst job in the nation of funding low-income school districts. "The state of Pennsylvania is 50th, dead last, in terms of the inequality between how wealthy school districts are funded and poor districts," Duncan said. Recent Education Department figures show that the amount spent on each student in Pennsylvania's poorest school districts is 33 percent less than the amount spent on each student in the wealthier districts.
NEWS
March 21, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Janice Lear's eighth-grade students listened recently as the geography teacher read a book that opened their eyes to the challenges children around the world face just to get clean water. "The kids were so moved by it," Lear said. "I remember them saying, 'Ms. Lear, this is not OK. What can we do?' " To that end, eighth graders at Charles F. Patton Middle School in Kennett Square, Chester County, have raised more than $4,800 so far to build a well for a school in Uganda and a water-filtration system and hand-washing station for a school in the Dominican Republic.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than most, Ted Ruger understands legal complexity. And a good thing, too. The former Supreme Court law clerk is set to take over as dean of the University of Pennsylvania law school July 1. Penn, along with a handful of other elite U.S. law schools, brands itself as a training ground for top students who learn to grapple with the most difficult legal problems. That's why so many of the highest-paying law firms want to hire them, even in a job market that still is struggling.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | By Regina Medina and Abby Cruz, Daily News Staff Writers
EDUCATOR Sandra Gonzalez has an inactive principal certificate - that means she cannot work as a principal at any public school in Pennsylvania. Yet, 2014 payroll records at Antonia Pantoja Charter School identify her as principal, a website run by her employer lists her as principal, Gonzalez occupies the office reserved for the principal, and she takes the lead on issues concerning Pantoja at monthly principal meetings. During interviews by phone and at the North Philadelphia school last week, more than a dozen parents, students and staff named Gonzalez when asked if they knew who the principal was. "Sandra Gonzalez is the principal of Pantoja," said parent Maryelis Santiago, 26, whose daughter Lindsey Viera, 6, is in kindergarten.
NEWS
March 20, 2015
THE LATEST Pew Philadelphia Poll offers some revealing numbers about what city residents think of the public schools. The short answer is: not much. According to Pew, 77 percent of city residents rate the district's performance as either poor or fair. Only 19 percent rate it as good or excellent. These are depressing numbers about a system with the important and vital job of educating our children. The good news is that Philadelphians seemed to have woken up when it comes to education.
FOOD
March 20, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
As I drove into the parking lot of Roberto Clemente Middle School in North Philadelphia to start my cooking classes there, my competition was staring me in the face: a giant Burger King sign. The restaurant is not even a minute's walk from the school. Trying to convince kids to cook healthy meals in a fast-food world is hard enough. But with Whoppers wooing them across the parking lot? There ought to be a law! If I needed confirmation that these students, like so many other American middle schoolers, were eating this junk, I got that pretty quickly: My five eighth-grade girls answered a questionnaire about what they eat for dinner and how often they eat fast food.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
WHEN MAYOR Nutter proposed hiking property taxes 9.3 percent to give $105 million to the struggling school district two weeks ago, not one member of City Council gave a thumbs up. Instead, many said they'd come up with other ways to help the schools. Yesterday, at-large Councilman W. Wilson Goode Jr. introduced a resolution which he said would generate millions, though he stopped short of estimating just how many millions. The resolution calls for the Nutter administration to ask large nonprofit institutions - think universities and hospitals - to voluntarily contribute money for the schools.
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
The teacher had heard about the books. Thousands and thousands of them, from two dozen city schools shuttered two years ago. Perfectly usable. All sitting boxed up and unused in the basement of the Philadelphia School District's headquarters. Like so many city teachers, she uses fund-raising websites to get the books she needs for her students. Like so many city teachers, she has students who can't bring home their torn-up textbooks because there aren't enough to go around.
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | Mensah M. Dean & Solomon Leach, Daily News Staff Writers
SHORTLY AFTER the newly created School Reform Commission was sworn in to assume control of the struggling city school district in early 2002, the Daily News began to receive word about a West Philadelphia charter school that had big problems of its own. It wasn't just any charter school, and it wasn't just struggling. It was the Renaissance Advantage Charter School - founded by state Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams - and the school was falling apart, according to teachers and parents who spoke to the paper for a March 11, 2002, article.
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Haddonfield United, a grassroots group that marshaled opposition to a referendum that would have let the school district buy the Bancroft School property two years ago, has come out against the site's becoming a drug and alcohol treatment center. "Although detox and rehabilitation centers provide important services to those addicted to drugs and alcohol," said group founder Brian Kelly, "the location of the proposed complex is highly inappropriate and incongruous with its surroundings, as the site is immediately next to the high school, about 150 yards from Tatem Elementary School, and in the middle of a compact residential neighborhood.
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