FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 30, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Small high schools came to Philadelphia in a big way four years ago, when four new ones opened their doors. Less than three miles apart, High School of the Future in Parkside and Science Leadership Academy (SLA) in Center City had vastly different beginnings. Expectations for both were high. Both awarded their first diplomas this month. But although leadership was identified as key to both, one had turmoil at the top and the other had a stable principal. Though both emphasized technology and were given freedom to innovate, one kept a close eye on district standards and the other initially veered from the path.
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Ibrahim Barzak and Dalia Nammari, Associated Press
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - Starting with the new school year in September, Gaza boys and girls in middle and high school will be breaking the law if they study side by side. Gaza's Islamic militant Hamas rulers argue that new legislation, mandating gender separation in schools from age 9, enshrines common practice. But women's activists warned Tuesday that it's another step in what it sees as the Hamas agenda of imposing its fundamentalist world view on Gaza's 1.7 million people. The Gaza rules appear harsh compared to Western practice but are not unusual in parts of the Arab and Muslim world.
FOOD
October 24, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Seventy-five schoolchildren will be learning how to slice onions, cook pasta, roast vegetables, and make dinners like stuffed peppers and homemade tomato soup this fall as My Daughter's Kitchen cooking program continues to expand and evolve in its fourth season. The mission remains the same as when the lessons began with my own daughter: teaching kids to cook simple, healthful, delicious meals on a budget. Thirty-two volunteers - most of them Inquirer readers who wrote in after reading about the program - will begin teaching 15 afterschool classes around the city and across the river in Camden.
NEWS
June 4, 2007
What qualities are important for a new Philadelphia schools chief? We'd like to hear from Philadelphia residents in 150 words or less. E-mail us at suburbanletters@phillynews.com or write us at Regional Commentary Page, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 800 River Rd., Conshohocken, Pa., 19428. All letters must include a full name, home address, and day and evening phone numbers.
NEWS
December 27, 2005
Let me commend you for reporting that "the Eastern PA Organizing Project, a faith-based and community group... " rebuked the School District of Philadelphia. Faith groups can and should rebuke secular organizations, for faith groups are better at changing lives than secular organizations. We are accountable to the God who made us, whereas secular organizations leave out God all together. The only hope for improving the educational system in America is impacting the Word of God upon it. Thomas Muldoon, Philadelphia
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
SUPERINTENDENT William R. Hite Jr., saying he had "few options," announced Thursday that the School District will recommend closing 37 schools as part of a plan to establish "a school system that is better run, safer and higher performing. " Calling it "a historic moment," Hite said his recommendations also included changing the grade levels of 23 schools and making other program changes affecting another seven. The total savings for the district could be up to $28 million beginning in 2014-15, he said.
NEWS
October 1, 2011 | By Jay Reeves, Associated Press
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - Hispanic students have started vanishing from Alabama public schools after a court ruling that upheld the state's tough new law on illegal immigration. Education officials say scores of immigrant families have withdrawn their children from classes or kept them home this week, afraid that sending the children to school would draw attention from authorities. There are no precise statewide numbers. But several districts with large immigrant enrollments reported a sudden exodus of children of Hispanic parents, some of whom told officials they would leave the state to avoid trouble with the law, which requires schools to check students' immigration status.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Michelle Faul, Associated Press
LAGOS, Nigeria - Shaking a finger while cradling an assault rifle, the leader of Nigeria's extremist Islamic sect threatened to burn down more schools and kill teachers. But he denied that his fighters were killing children. In a new video released Saturday, Islamic radical Abubakar Shekau said he "fully supports" attacks on several schools in recent weeks. The U.N. Children's Fund says at least 48 students and seven teachers have been killed since June, with some burned alive this month in a dormitory.
NEWS
August 9, 2013
THIRTY-ONE days just became seven. If City Council doesn't move on certifying $50 million in proceeds from the sales tax to the School District by next Friday, Superintendent William Hite says he will be unable to open the schools on Sept. 9. So the daily countdown of time remaining in the standoff between the schools and the state and city lawmakers who have fallen short of finding the money the schools need to open has just been shortened. More to the point, Hite has finally introduced the nuclear option.
SPORTS
January 15, 2012 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
With three of the league's football-playing schools set to close in June, Catholic League athletic directors on Thursday approved a proposal by football coaches to divide the league into two divisions. As it previously did, the five-team Red Division (Class AAAA) will include Archbishop Ryan, Father Judge, La Salle, Roman Catholic, and St. Joseph's Prep. The six-team Blue Division, a mix of Class AAA and AA schools, will consist of Archbishop Carroll (Class AA), Archbishop Wood (AAA)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
January 22, 2015 | By Mark Macyk, Inquirer Staff Writer
Years from now, when they talk about great moments in the Episcopal Academy-Haverford School boys' basketball rivalry, they might still be talking about Conner Delaney's shot. The Episcopal Academy sophomore drained a three-pointer from the left corner with a hand in his face and 5.2 seconds on the clock Tuesday to send the Churchmen to a 50-48 win at Haverford School. Mike Hinckley assisted on the winning shot. Haverford School, which had trailed throughout much of the second half, took the lead on a dunk by Lamar Stevens with 10 seconds remaining.
FOOD
January 22, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
A resurrected seafood house on the site of Bookbinder's. A pub serving fried bologna and roast beef sandwiches. A 1980s theme restaurant bringing back the surf and turf. A vintage-styled dinette, slinging Western omelets. Suddenly, it seems that the newest local trend in food isn't about the future at all - it's about looking back. Just when you thought it was safe to hock your fondue pot on eBay, here comes all the food you haven't seen on menus for a couple of decades. The good news is that verbs and conjunctions might also return to menus as chefs forgo their molecular aspirations to get back to the basics.
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Aaron Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Devon Goodman might still be in the process of finding his voice on the basketball court. But Friday night against rival Haverford School, his play did the talking. The 5-foot-11 junior scored 17 points on 5-for-7 shooting, added four assists, pilfered a steal and blocked a shot in Germantown Academy's thrilling 65-58 home victory. However, Goodman understands a bashful point guard just won't do. "I'm a quiet guy," he said. "I think I show more of myself on the court, but I don't really talk that much.
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
At some city public schools, there is no recess at all - deep budget cuts mean there are not enough adults to monitor students' playtime. But at McMichael Elementary in Mantua, children troop out onto the schoolyard in orderly lines, pledge to be respectful and kind, then break out into orderly but joyous games of football, dodgeball and foursquare - blowing off steam with a genial man known as Coach Steve. McMichael is one of 13 Philadelphia School District schools and three city charters that use Playworks, a nonprofit that places a full-time staffer in schools to structure recess.
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
All 40 applications for new charter schools should be rejected because additional charters would only deepen the district's financial problems, Public Citizens for Children and Youth urged the Philadelphia School Reform Commission on Thursday. And absent new revenues, the report by the Philadelphia-based nonprofit (PCCY) said, any new charter would cause the district to cut more resources from its underfunded schools. "Parents across the city want schools to improve, and they have every right to be impatient about the progress of reform," said Donna Cooper, executive director of PCCY.
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a frantic six-week fund-raising campaign, students and staff at St. Paul School breathed a huge sigh of relief Thursday. Faced with a do-or-die, they rallied to raise more than the $250,000 needed to save the parish school in Burlington City. Principal William Robbins called it a miracle. "We did it," Robbins said. "We raised a quarter of a million dollars. Who would have thought it?" Students and staff heard the news during morning prayer at the start of the school day. "They all gave a standing ovation and cheered," the principal said.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
The former solicitor of the Coatesville Area School District will be sued over alleged overbilling of the district, joining the former superintendent and former athletic director as a target of litigation. The Coatesville school board voted Tuesday to sue James Ellison; his former law firm, Rhoads & Sinon; and the law firm he formed, Susquehanna Legal Group, to recover money that board members say is owed the district. A Chester County grand jury report released last month accused Ellison and his law firms of overbilling the district.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden School District officials are investigating claims by a woman who says school security officers roughed up her 16-year-old son in a fight last November. A school spokesman said the incident, part of which was captured on Woodrow Wilson High School's hallway surveillance cameras as security officers subdued the boy, stemmed from a rule violation and escalated when the student threatened a staff member. "This is obviously a serious and unsettling incident," district spokesman Brendan Lowe said in a statement.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
U NINSPIRING seems to be the word most often attached to Philadelphia's current field of mayoral hopefuls. Don't tell that to the more than 100 people who were on the dance floor at Tierra Colombiana yesterday to hear former Common Pleas Judge Nelson Diaz formally announce his candidacy during a stump speech focused on economic and educational equality. Salsa music. Empanadas and plantains. The occasional shout of "Puerto Rico!" and "Arriba! Arriba!" Maybe Diaz, 67, is a long shot when matched up against political heavies like Lynne Abraham and Anthony Williams, but it didn't feel that way inside the Hunting Park restaurant and club.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
A NEW REPORT on K-12 education funding finds that Philadelphia lags behind many big-city school districts in per-pupil funding. The report, commissioned by Pew Charitable Trusts, analyzes funding of 10 large school districts across the country in states with a comprehensive funding formula that takes into account need, demographics and poverty. (Pennsylvania is one of three states that does not have such a formula.) It concludes that in 2012-13, the Philadelphia School District spent roughly $12,570 per pupil - less than the average of Boston, Milwaukee, Cleveland, New York, Baltimore, Chicago and Detroit.
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