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NEWS
June 30, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Small high schools came to Philadelphia in a big way four years ago, when four new ones opened their doors. Less than three miles apart, High School of the Future in Parkside and Science Leadership Academy (SLA) in Center City had vastly different beginnings. Expectations for both were high. Both awarded their first diplomas this month. But although leadership was identified as key to both, one had turmoil at the top and the other had a stable principal. Though both emphasized technology and were given freedom to innovate, one kept a close eye on district standards and the other initially veered from the path.
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Ibrahim Barzak and Dalia Nammari, Associated Press
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - Starting with the new school year in September, Gaza boys and girls in middle and high school will be breaking the law if they study side by side. Gaza's Islamic militant Hamas rulers argue that new legislation, mandating gender separation in schools from age 9, enshrines common practice. But women's activists warned Tuesday that it's another step in what it sees as the Hamas agenda of imposing its fundamentalist world view on Gaza's 1.7 million people. The Gaza rules appear harsh compared to Western practice but are not unusual in parts of the Arab and Muslim world.
NEWS
June 4, 2007
What qualities are important for a new Philadelphia schools chief? We'd like to hear from Philadelphia residents in 150 words or less. E-mail us at suburbanletters@phillynews.com or write us at Regional Commentary Page, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 800 River Rd., Conshohocken, Pa., 19428. All letters must include a full name, home address, and day and evening phone numbers.
NEWS
December 27, 2005
Let me commend you for reporting that "the Eastern PA Organizing Project, a faith-based and community group... " rebuked the School District of Philadelphia. Faith groups can and should rebuke secular organizations, for faith groups are better at changing lives than secular organizations. We are accountable to the God who made us, whereas secular organizations leave out God all together. The only hope for improving the educational system in America is impacting the Word of God upon it. Thomas Muldoon, Philadelphia
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
SUPERINTENDENT William R. Hite Jr., saying he had "few options," announced Thursday that the School District will recommend closing 37 schools as part of a plan to establish "a school system that is better run, safer and higher performing. " Calling it "a historic moment," Hite said his recommendations also included changing the grade levels of 23 schools and making other program changes affecting another seven. The total savings for the district could be up to $28 million beginning in 2014-15, he said.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | BY JENNIFER WRIGHT, Daily News Staff Writer wrightj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
WHILE STUDENTS headed home for the summer yesterday, the School Reform Commission approved the first of two staff outsourcing plans with the intent to cut costs and staff empty classrooms. The SRC voted unanimously to give Source4Teachers, based in Cherry Hill, N.J., a $34 million contract to manage substitute staffing services for two years. Chairwoman Marjorie Neff and Commissioner Sylvia Simms missed the meeting but cast their votes in a conference call. "The vendor was able to commit to us to provide high quality substitutes at a 90 percent fill rate by January of next year," said Naomi Wyatt, the district's head of human resources.
NEWS
September 8, 2010 | Inquirer Staff Report
Mayor Nutter, himself a product of a parochial education, was on hand today to greet youngsters at a Catholic school in North Philadelphia as the 2010-11 academic year began for the 72,000 students attending schools operated by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. It also was the first day of school for Catholic schools in South Jersey. Nutter, a graduate of Transfiguration of Our Lord Catholic Elementary School in West Philadelphia and St. Joseph's Prep, greeted students at Incarnation of Our Lord Elementary School, 425 W. Lindley Ave., in Olney.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Michelle Faul, Associated Press
LAGOS, Nigeria - Shaking a finger while cradling an assault rifle, the leader of Nigeria's extremist Islamic sect threatened to burn down more schools and kill teachers. But he denied that his fighters were killing children. In a new video released Saturday, Islamic radical Abubakar Shekau said he "fully supports" attacks on several schools in recent weeks. The U.N. Children's Fund says at least 48 students and seven teachers have been killed since June, with some burned alive this month in a dormitory.
NEWS
August 9, 2013
THIRTY-ONE days just became seven. If City Council doesn't move on certifying $50 million in proceeds from the sales tax to the School District by next Friday, Superintendent William Hite says he will be unable to open the schools on Sept. 9. So the daily countdown of time remaining in the standoff between the schools and the state and city lawmakers who have fallen short of finding the money the schools need to open has just been shortened. More to the point, Hite has finally introduced the nuclear option.
SPORTS
January 15, 2012 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
With three of the league's football-playing schools set to close in June, Catholic League athletic directors on Thursday approved a proposal by football coaches to divide the league into two divisions. As it previously did, the five-team Red Division (Class AAAA) will include Archbishop Ryan, Father Judge, La Salle, Roman Catholic, and St. Joseph's Prep. The six-team Blue Division, a mix of Class AAA and AA schools, will consist of Archbishop Carroll (Class AA), Archbishop Wood (AAA)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 21, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Moments after buying some Advil and bottled water at a Suburban Station newsstand, Serena Starnes realized that she was out of cigarettes. She quickly went back and paid $9.50 for a pack of Newports. Had Starnes been in the suburbs, she would have paid much less because of the city's $2-a-pack tax earmarked for city schools. The extra $2 stings, but at least the money is going to help educate her children, the unemployed barber said. "It's good because it's going toward the schools," the mother of nine said.
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
A GROUP OF University of Pennsylvania graduate students got a case study on challenges facing urban school districts right in their own back yard yesterday - at the Philadelphia School District. The students, who are taking a course on schools as organizations at Penn's Graduate School of Education, visited the district's headquarters to probe officials on various topics, including school design and the use of data. Grace Cannon, head of the Office of New School Models, discussed the district's three new high schools, opened last year, which use a project-based, competency-driven method.
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Sister Janice M. Heery was teaching in the elementary school in St. Rose of Lima parish in Haddon Heights in the early 2000s, Colleen Banasz was teaching sixth-grade classes across the hall. "She was famous for her grammar lessons," Banasz, now president of Evoy-Banasz Funeral Home in Haddon Heights, said of Sister Heery. "Her students were so well-prepared," Banasz said, "that when they went to high school, their teachers could recognize they were taught by Sister Janice. " On Tuesday, July 14, Sister Heery, 78, a Dominican nun known earlier as Sister Jean Michael, died of lung inflammation at her home in Haddon Heights.
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly five years after former Superintendent Arlene C. Ackerman steered a major no-bid contract for surveillance cameras to a minority firm not approved for emergency work, the Philadelphia School District could be spending at least $3.6 million to defend and make amends for the move. The cash-strapped district already has paid $1.8 million to outside lawyers to represent it in four lawsuits stemming from the contract, according to information The Inquirer obtained from the district under the state's Right-to-Know Law. In the first case to go to trial, a federal jury found that Ackerman, her former head of human resources, and the district had wrongfully suspended and recommended firing Francis X. Dougherty, a top administrator, for exposing the contract.
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE PRINCIPAL of Waldron Mercy Academy sent a letter to frustrated parents yesterday, writing that the school family had been "shaken" and "challenged to our core" by the recent decision to fire a lesbian staffer. Nell Stetser, principal of the independent Catholic school in Merion Station, asked parents, "with a humble heart," to meet with her and with an independent facilitator before the first day of school. "I understand that there are feelings of frustration, disappointment, betrayal, anger and sorrow.
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | By Chris Brennan and Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writers
A private Catholic elementary school beset by controversy after firing a popular faculty member for being in a same-sex marriage is calling in help to deal with outraged parents. Nell Stetser, principal of Waldron Mercy Academy in Merion, wrote to parents and faculty Wednesday, acknowledging that the school's community "has been shaken" by the firing of Margie Winters, the school's director of religious education since 2007. "I understand that there are feelings of frustration, disappointment, betrayal, anger, and sorrow," wrote Stetser, who fired Winters on June 22 after she refused to resign.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
THE MUSICAL chairs among Superintendent William Hite's senior staff continues. Donyall Dickey, the school district's chief academic-supports officer, is leaving the district at the beginning of August, a spokesman confirmed yesterday. He is expected to be hired as chief schools officer of the Atlanta Public Schools, officials there announced Monday. The school board will vote on the recommendation Aug. 10. Dickey was appointed to his current post last July, after coming to Philadelphia as an assistant superintendent in September 2013.
NEWS
July 15, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE SISTERS OF Mercy order and Waldron Mercy Academy officials "showed character and common sense" in their decision to fire a school staffer who is in a same-sex marriage, Archbishop Charles J. Chaput said yesterday. The Archbishop was not alone in his support for Waldron Mercy Academy's dismissal of Margie Winters after eight years of employment. The Sisters of Mercy, which sponsors the Montgomery County Catholic school, also issued a bluntly worded letter to parents, telling them the Waldron Mercy decision is final.
NEWS
July 14, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he was hired as superintendent of Rose Tree Media School District in 2011, James Wigo was called the "best of the best" by the consultant who brought him to the school board's attention. Now, after several personnel moves have shaken the 3,800-student district - including the firing of a beloved elementary principal and the hiring of a middle school principal who subsequently was arrested and pleaded guilty to possessing child pornography - the 64-year-old superintendent is the one on slippery ground.
NEWS
July 11, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marianna J. Emanuele taught in Philadelphia schools as a nun with the Congregation of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, from the early 1960s to the early 1980s. A brother, John Emanuele, said she then left convent life "because she wanted to do more, more than just teaching. She wanted to reach out to people. " So, he said, from 1983 to 1993, she worked as a civilian missionary in Kenya. "She was teaching women that were going to have children how to take care of them," he said.
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