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NEWS
June 5, 2012 | Daily News Editorial
SCREAMING and yelling is not unknown at School Reform Commission meetings, but last week's meeting was loud by any standard. The SRC met and approved a bare-bones budget that few are happy with, and parents and activists weren't shy about saying how little they thought of a budget that leaves many schools without nurses, police officers and office supplies; could lead to mass layoffs; and counts on more than $200 million in borrowing, even though officials...
NEWS
April 10, 1997 | by Yvette Ousley, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia School District officials have canceled outdoor activities at 11 schools on Monday because of concern about the march through Grays Ferry. But some students fear that the move will not be enough to keep them safe. "The school needs to close the whole day Monday because if tensions fly up during the rally, the kids will still have to walk home regardless," said Shamayara Woodson, Audenried High School's junior class president. Audenried is along the march route.
NEWS
March 24, 1996
Earlier this year, we asked the region's students to tell us what was right with their schools, what was wrong and how they thought what was wrong could be put right. More than 2,300 responded. The underlying message of their essays - whether about teaching, discipline, or the food in the cafeteria - was this: We are not fooled. The students made clear that they know when a burned-out teacher is mailing it in. They can tell when adults who preach values don't uphold them because it's inconvenient.
NEWS
June 18, 2004
Students complain about having no math teacher and playing basketball instead, of having rafts of substitutes and uncertified teachers all year. I have no doubt that these stories are true since I've taught for 35 years in Philadelphia, but the reason these stories are true go much deeper. True, teachers with more seniority tend to transfer from the schools mentioned in Dale Mezzacappa's May 27 article, "Students voice ire over lack of certified teachers. " The real reason they seek to leave is because of the chaos in those schools, not students' incomes or ethnic backgrounds.
NEWS
April 30, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
IN 1939, a 6-year-old boy moved to Detroit with his working-class parents - Lithuanian Jewish immigrants - and walked into the remarkable engine that propelled so much of America's prosperity in the 20th century, his neighborhood public school. That kid, Eli Broad, graduated from Detroit Central High School in 1951 and went on to become one of the world's richest people, a billionaire who made his fortune first in the post-World War II housing boom and later in insurance. Today, the 79-year-old Broad (it rhymes with "road")
NEWS
April 14, 2016
The Neshaminy school board voted to close two elementary schools Tuesday night as part of a consolidation plan, despite a yearlong campaign by parents at one of the schools to keep it open. At a special meeting that lasted close to two hours, the board voted, 9-0, to close the Lower Southampton School in Feasterville and, 5-4, to close Oliver Heckman School in Langhorne at the end of the year. Heckman parents had argued that the closing would leave the north end of the district, one of the state's largest with 9,000 students, without a grade school.
NEWS
March 14, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
As president of Conwell-Egan Catholic High School, Janet Dollard is in charge of everything except academics on the small Bucks County campus. But in these challenging times for Catholic school enrollments, her job has been taking her far beyond Fairless Hills, on a mission to sign up foreign students willing to spend big money to pursue an American high school diploma. This month, for the fourth time in as many years, Dollard flew to China to spend three weeks sales-talking parents.
NEWS
June 12, 1996 | By John Way Jennings, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Five schools have been burglarized in recent days, with thieves striking day-care centers, high schools, and an elementary school, Camden police reported. Rooms were ransacked and vending machines broken into. The burglaries began at the Office of Equal Opportunities Child Development Center at 1475 S. 8th St. early Saturday. Despite setting off an alarm, thieves were able to steal more than $1,300 worth of property, including eating utensils, calculators and two portable stereos.
NEWS
August 23, 2001
AFTER READING your story (Aug. 8) on the Philadelphia School District's problems with disruptive students, let me tell you about a program I run in New Hampshire. I am supervisor of the Out of School Suspension Alternative for grades 6, 7 and 8. In addition to eliminating the "day off with a remote" benefit of suspension, this pilot program assists with academics, incorporates community service and tries to bring each student to some level of accountability and responsibility.
SPORTS
January 25, 1990 | By Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer
Athletic directors from nine football independents met via conference call yesterday to continue discussions regarding formation of an all-sports conference. Temple, Miami, Boston College, Pittsburgh, Rutgers, South Carolina, Syracuse, Virginia Tech and West Virginia remain interested in the Eastern seaboard concept, said Charles Theokas, Temple's athletic director. The teleconference was the fourth session of formal talks regarding alignment over the past two years. "We talked about potential opportunities, and we'll continue to keep talking about the Eastern seaboard all-sports thing," Theokas said.
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