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Schuylkill Banks

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NEWS
September 1, 2011 | BY HANNAH EHLENFELDT, ehlenfh@phillynews.com 609-668-9929
FOR PHILADELPHIA'S parks, the road to recovery from Hurricane Irene may be long and muddy. "The repair of this damage can last weeks, months, years," said Mark Focht, the city's first deputy commissioner of parks and facilities. He estimated yesterday that Irene damaged about 1,100 trees - about half street trees and half trees in parks - and said that six crews across the city have been methodically "assessing and addressing" the damage to plantings, trails and other park infrastructure.
NEWS
January 3, 2011
Some may think the duck boats were an endangered species, given the way the Nutter administration appears to be forging ahead with a misguided plan to bring the lumbering, noisy vehicles, filled with quacking tourists, to the bucolic Schuylkill. Despite impassioned public opposition to moving the ducks across town from the Delaware River, the administration belatedly sought bids for an amphibious tour operator on the Schuylkill. No surprise, the bidding produced just one bid - the same Ride the Ducks attraction involved in a fatal crash on July 7. With no competing proposals, Nutter administration officials will be left to evaluate the bid in a vacuum.
NEWS
August 16, 2013
J ASON MIFFLIN, 38, of Roxborough, owns Hidden River Outfitters, which provides guided kayak tours on the Schuylkill on Thursday evenings and weekends from May to October. Prices range from $40 per person for basic kayak tours to $75 for advanced tours. The company also offers paddleboard lessons at Penn's Landing for $50. Q: How did you get involved with Hidden River Outfitters? A: Several years ago I met a guy who was interested in starting kayak tours and told him I'd love to help.
NEWS
December 28, 2010 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ride the Ducks is the sole bidder to run a water cruise, but city officials say they may not allow the popular attraction to operate if it disrupts a local park. "We understand the concerns and are very cognizant of the impact that a poor proposal could have on Schuylkill Banks," said Brian Abernathy, chief of staff in the Managing Director's Office, which is overseeing the bidding. The city proposed moving the tours, which include land and water travel, from the Delaware River to the Schuylkill.
NEWS
January 16, 2011 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
I'm not sure who likes Ride the Ducks besides public officials and misguided tourists. The experience is expensive, loud, and unequivocally obnoxious. In July, it turned deadly, when a tug-driven barge ran over a duck boat on the Delaware, killing two young Hungarian visitors. Lawsuits, hand-wringing, blistering editorials, and emotional hearings ensued, but the likely outcome appears relatively unchanged, according to the tour company's website - with one major exception. Like the swallows to Capistrano, the ducks plan to return in the spring to again clog roads, annoy residents, and sully an entirely different river.
NEWS
January 21, 2011 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The people who run the Ride the Ducks tours may be quackers, but they're not stupid. Recognizing the public opposition to their plan to tear up Philadelphia's beloved Schuylkill Banks park, they've come up with a new spot for their boat launch, a sliver of land on the west side of the river, in the shadow of I-76. Although the new route was submitted to the city in late December, the Nutter administration has kept the contents a virtual state secret while it negotiates a financially - and politically - acceptable deal with the tour company.
NEWS
January 13, 2011
Why is Mayor Nutter's administration applying star-chamber secrecy to its deliberations on a public policy issue of widespread interest: whether to let duck-boat tours disrupt the bucolic Schuylkill? This isn't exactly the Manhattan Project. Yet Managing Director Richard Negrin refuses to name the city officials who are advising the mayor on whether Ride the Ducks will get to resume tours this spring, eight months after the death of two patrons in a July 7 crash on the Delaware River.
NEWS
December 23, 2010
Business model is what Christie wants Gov. Christie has nominated former New York City deputy schools chancellor Christopher Cerf to be education commissioner. Is it me, or does anyone else see the incongruity of selecting someone to run New Jersey's schools from a state ranked lower than New Jersey in national academic assessments? Christie has made it no secret that he is a supporter of charter schools, and so is Cerf, who is a former chief executive of Edison Schools, the country's largest for-profit operator of public schools.
NEWS
October 21, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For years, it's been one of those "only in Philly" kind of conundrums: You couldn't easily get to the Schuylkill from the place known as Schuylkill River Park. Between the bright green oasis at 25th and Spruce Streets and the beckoning waterfront are hard-to-cross CSX railroad tracks. Access denied - until Saturday. A long-anticipated and fought-over pedestrian bridge that connects the park to the riverfront trail known as Schuylkill Banks opened Saturday, on time and under budget.
NEWS
June 11, 2012 | Daily News Staff Report
DEVELOPMENT Grays Ferry trail party The newest segment of the Schuylkill Banks park, the Grays Ferry Crescent, will be unveiled at 11 a.m. Monday. The city and the Schuylkill River Development Corporation will announce the opening of this first segment of the Schuylkill River Trail that is in South Philadelphia. The new segment expands waterfront recreation opportunities to the neighborhoods of Forgotten Bottom, Grays Ferry and Point Breeze. Mayor Nutter, and other dignitaries are expected for the trail segment opening at Grays Ferry Crescent Esplanade on the east bank of the Schuylkill River, near Schuylkill Avenue and Wharton Street.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 4, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Schuylkill Banks Boardwalk, an $18 million concrete walkway that seemingly floats atop the Schuylkill with spectacular views of University City and Center City, opened to the public Thursday. Officials and citizens praised the sleek walkway as an amenity that will endure for generations. Supported by caissons drilled into the riverbed between Locust and South Streets, the 15-foot-wide walkway is the latest milestone in a years-long effort to convert eight miles of the industrial banks of the Schuylkill into interconnecting walking, cycling, and running trails between the Delaware River and the Fairmount Dam. With a ramp to the walkway visible behind them, Mayor Nutter, U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah, and other dignitaries took to a podium under overcast skies to lavish the project with accolades.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
THE $18 MILLION Schuylkill Banks Boardwalk opens today, so Philadelphians and their leashed dogs can "walk on water" from Locust Street to the South Street Bridge. Bike on water, too. Built out into the river parallel to the east bank, the 2,000-foot boardwalk experience is a heady mix of ducks and trucks, trees and breeze, cityscape and landscape, roadway and waterway, industrial and pastoral, trains and turtles, big sky and big city. Strolling along the city's newest people magnet yesterday, Joseph Syrnick, president/CEO of the Schuylkill River Development Corporation, who has spent eight years guiding the project from drawing board to boardwalk, talked about the romance of the river.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Let New York gloat about completing the High Line. Philadelphia is about to debut a linear park that might be even more impressive: the Schuylkill Banks Boardwalk. As wonderful as the High Line is, it merely allows people to wend their way through Manhattan a few stories above its bustling streets. When the latest segment of the Schuylkill Banks trail opens to the public Thursday, you'll be able to walk on water, under the glittering gaze of the Center City skyline. The new 15-foot-wide walkway dives into the river at Locust Street, and doesn't crawl back onto dry land until it reaches the South Street Bridge, a joyous journey more than 2,000 feet long.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Philadelphia spent the last decade working out a single, knotty planning problem: How should the old industrial spaces on the Delaware waterfront evolve? The consensus was that vacant land would be developed to resemble the rest of the city, with walkable streets, a mix of uses, and lively ground floors. No one was naive enough to think such projects could be realized without parking garages, but the expectation was that the structures would not dominate the river. It's a shame the conversation was never extended to the city's other riverfront, the Schuylkill, which has come alive since a trail park pushed into Center City.
NEWS
August 16, 2013
J ASON MIFFLIN, 38, of Roxborough, owns Hidden River Outfitters, which provides guided kayak tours on the Schuylkill on Thursday evenings and weekends from May to October. Prices range from $40 per person for basic kayak tours to $75 for advanced tours. The company also offers paddleboard lessons at Penn's Landing for $50. Q: How did you get involved with Hidden River Outfitters? A: Several years ago I met a guy who was interested in starting kayak tours and told him I'd love to help.
NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, it's been one of those "only in Philly" kind of conundrums: You couldn't easily get to the Schuylkill from the place known as Schuylkill River Park. Between the bright green oasis at 25th and Spruce Streets and the beckoning waterfront are hard-to-cross CSX railroad tracks. Access denied - until Saturday. A long-anticipated and fought-over pedestrian bridge that connects the park to the riverfront trail known as Schuylkill Banks opened Saturday, on time and under budget.
NEWS
October 21, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For years, it's been one of those "only in Philly" kind of conundrums: You couldn't easily get to the Schuylkill from the place known as Schuylkill River Park. Between the bright green oasis at 25th and Spruce Streets and the beckoning waterfront are hard-to-cross CSX railroad tracks. Access denied - until Saturday. A long-anticipated and fought-over pedestrian bridge that connects the park to the riverfront trail known as Schuylkill Banks opened Saturday, on time and under budget.
NEWS
June 11, 2012 | Daily News Staff Report
DEVELOPMENT Grays Ferry trail party The newest segment of the Schuylkill Banks park, the Grays Ferry Crescent, will be unveiled at 11 a.m. Monday. The city and the Schuylkill River Development Corporation will announce the opening of this first segment of the Schuylkill River Trail that is in South Philadelphia. The new segment expands waterfront recreation opportunities to the neighborhoods of Forgotten Bottom, Grays Ferry and Point Breeze. Mayor Nutter, and other dignitaries are expected for the trail segment opening at Grays Ferry Crescent Esplanade on the east bank of the Schuylkill River, near Schuylkill Avenue and Wharton Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2011
Special Events Boat to Bartram's Garden River Tour Down the Schuylkill. Tour the botanic gardens & Bartram House. Schuylkill Banks, Market St.; Reservations required: 215-222-6030 Ext 100. $30; $20 children 12 and under. Closes 10/16. Fall Birdseed Sale 20% off for members & 10% for nonmembers. Schuylkill Center, 8480 Hagy's Mill Rd. Closes 10/2. Fall Festival Beer Garden German beer & foods, karaoke & a balloon artist. McGillin's Olde Ale House, 1310 Drury St.; 215-735-5562.
NEWS
September 1, 2011 | BY HANNAH EHLENFELDT, ehlenfh@phillynews.com 609-668-9929
FOR PHILADELPHIA'S parks, the road to recovery from Hurricane Irene may be long and muddy. "The repair of this damage can last weeks, months, years," said Mark Focht, the city's first deputy commissioner of parks and facilities. He estimated yesterday that Irene damaged about 1,100 trees - about half street trees and half trees in parks - and said that six crews across the city have been methodically "assessing and addressing" the damage to plantings, trails and other park infrastructure.
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