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NEWS
March 20, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
When Muhammad Ali was training for a fight in Deer Lake, Pa., in the 1970s, the boxer was visited at his Schuylkill County compound by one of the few people in the world as famous as he. "A few years ago, Elvis came to see me at my training camp, stayed two weeks," Ali told TV Guide in 1979. "I said, 'Elvis, do me a favor. I got a guitar.' " The Greatest wanted The King to help him stir up a little trouble. He persuaded Presley to come with him to a bar in nearby Pottsville, "this little redneck place called Spoonies," where the duo sneaked in the back way. In Ali's telling, Presley went to the microphone with a towel on his head, then pulled it off, and sang, 'You ain't nothin' but a hound dog, cryin' all the time.
NEWS
September 20, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In another sign that natural gas is supplanting coal in the energy landscape, EmberClear Corp., a Canadian power developer, announced Wednesday it plans to build a 300-megawatt generation plant in Schuylkill County on a site where it had once envisioned a plant fueled by coal. EmberClear, which is based in Calgary, said it had selected SK E&C USA to build the Good Spring Natural Gas Combined Cycle power plant. The project, which EmberClear chief executive Albert Lin estimated would cost up to $400 million to build, will employ 500 construction workers.
NEWS
September 7, 1996 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A mental-health hearing officer for the Philadelphia court system, described by coworkers as reliable and dedicated to his job, has abruptly vanished, prompting a police investigation and provoking deep concern among his family and friends. Leonard Ivanoski Jr., 43, the son of Common Pleas Court Judge Leonard Ivanoski Sr., was reported missing by his wife, Joan, more than two weeks ago. She told police she had last seen her husband at 5 p.m. Aug. 21. Ivanoski's abandoned, unattended car, a white 1986 Saab, was found four days later parked on a residential street in the village of Hometown in Schuylkill County, a 1 1/2-hour drive from Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 10, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer / LINDA JOHNSON
NEW BRISTOL SUPERINTENDENT David Witmer chats with Marie Elena Dolan, president of the school board, at a reception welcoming him to his job. Witmer, 51, signed a three-year, $78,000 contract in July. Previously he was superintendent in the Pine Grove District in Schuylkill County. He replaced Joseph Kaufmann, who was superintendent for 12 years.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | By Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Robert Carey, director of the Philadelphia Department of Veterans Affairs Regional Office and Insurance Center, died Sunday in South Lake Tahoe, Calif. He was 44 and lived in East Falls. A native of Schuylkill County, Carey was born in Girardville and was a graduate of Pennsylvania State University. He began his career with the Veterans Administration in 1971, taking a position of benefits counselor following a tour of duty with the U.S. Army. He was appointed to the directorship in 1985.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Montgomery County man was ordered to stand trial Monday, accused of killing his father and enlisting his son to help dump the body in northeastern Pennsylvania. At a preliminary hearing in Conshohocken, David St. Onge Sr., 54, looked down as a detective read comments he allegedly made to investigators last month, including a conversation with his son after the attack. "I told David he had to help me get rid of his grandfather," St. Onge Sr. said, according to a statement read in court by Montgomery County Detective Paul Bradbury.
NEWS
February 26, 1987 | By HAROLD SHELLY and JOHN F. MORRISON, Special to the Daily News
A bloodsoaked mattress stained the snow among the children's swings and seesaws. Police had torn it apart looking for bullets, leaving bloody shreds of ticking strewn in the play yard. Shocked residents of this rural Berks County village passed the quiet brick house on Main Street in stunned silence yesterday. Not in anyone's memory had there been violence like this. That "nice young couple," Steven Paul, 30, and his wife, Linda Lee Paul, 37, who ran a day-care center in their home, had been shot to death early in the morning by two Rambo-like characters in camouflage suits who had already slaughtered another couple 15 miles away in Schuylkill County.
NEWS
September 17, 1991 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Where have all the Pennsylvanians gone? To Florida. And Maryland, Virginia, California and Texas. Anywhere, it seems, where the jobs are more plentiful and the sun shines more warmly. The state lost about 300,000 residents to out-migration in the last decade, census figures show, as more people moved out than moved in, continuing almost half a century of flight from Pennsylvania. And a state legislative subcommittee meeting here yesterday in one of the hardest-hit areas, Schuylkill County, said the people who were leaving were the state's youngest, brightest and richest.
NEWS
February 9, 1991 | By Stella M. Eisele and Ralph Vigoda, Special to The Inquirer
The FBI agents had Robert Peter Russell right where they wanted him yesterday: in a prison. So, they arrested him. And now, he's on the other side of the bars. Russell, 33, who began work Monday as a drug and alcohol counselor at Graterford Prison, was arrested at his job yesterday morning and charged with the murder of his wife, who disappeared March 4, 1989. Her body has not been found. Greg Golden of the Naval Intelligence Service in Quantico, Va., said that Russell, a native of Schuylkill County and a former Marine, became a suspect as soon as his estranged wife, Marine Capt.
NEWS
September 20, 1991 | by Jack McGuire and Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writers
A kidnapped real-estate dealer who was freed from a car trunk in upstate Pennsylvania on Tuesday is suspected of swindling the woman charged in his abduction, a cop and four other people out of more than $1 million, police said yesterday. The woman charged in the kidnap, former city bail commissioner Marie Ruch, contends that the dealer, Edward S. Bales, clipped her for $227,000 in a business partnership they had to buy, fix and sell houses, police said. But for now, she's the one sitting in jail, in the city's House of Correction, charged with kidnapping and other offenses after failing to post $50,000 bail.
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NEWS
August 6, 2014 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Montgomery County man was ordered to stand trial Monday, accused of killing his father and enlisting his son to help dump the body in northeastern Pennsylvania. At a preliminary hearing in Conshohocken, David St. Onge Sr., 54, looked down as a detective read comments he allegedly made to investigators last month, including a conversation with his son after the attack. "I told David he had to help me get rid of his grandfather," St. Onge Sr. said, according to a statement read in court by Montgomery County Detective Paul Bradbury.
NEWS
August 12, 2013 | BY JESSICA GLAZER, Daily News Staff Writer glazerj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5915
CONSTRUCTION ON the eagerly awaited boardwalk extension of the Schuylkill Banks trail is chugging along, with its slated completion date of August 2014 mostly intact. Weather delays this winter, however, could add a month or two to the contraction timeline, said Lane Fike, director of capital programs at the Schuylkill River Development Corporation. "They have to pour the concrete on the deck, and that is dependent on weather," he explained. "We're pretty happy with the progress.
NEWS
November 24, 2012 | By Stephen J. Pytak, POTTSVILLE REPUBLICAN-HERALD
ASHLAND, Pa. - Children were once punished with coal in their Christmas stockings. However, Len S. Kimmel prefers it when people give coal as a gift. Over many years, he has turned coal dust and rice coal - small pieces of anthracite - into jewelry and paperweights shaped like penguins and pigs. "I loved doing it and going out to be a vendor at shows and meeting people," said Kimmel, 79, of Fountain Springs. For more than 15 years, Kimmel has been crafting coal sculptures, using coal dust, rice coal, epoxy, and molds, and selling his work at area malls.
NEWS
September 20, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In another sign that natural gas is supplanting coal in the energy landscape, EmberClear Corp., a Canadian power developer, announced Wednesday it plans to build a 300-megawatt generation plant in Schuylkill County on a site where it had once envisioned a plant fueled by coal. EmberClear, which is based in Calgary, said it had selected SK E&C USA to build the Good Spring Natural Gas Combined Cycle power plant. The project, which EmberClear chief executive Albert Lin estimated would cost up to $400 million to build, will employ 500 construction workers.
NEWS
March 20, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
When Muhammad Ali was training for a fight in Deer Lake, Pa., in the 1970s, the boxer was visited at his Schuylkill County compound by one of the few people in the world as famous as he. "A few years ago, Elvis came to see me at my training camp, stayed two weeks," Ali told TV Guide in 1979. "I said, 'Elvis, do me a favor. I got a guitar.' " The Greatest wanted The King to help him stir up a little trouble. He persuaded Presley to come with him to a bar in nearby Pottsville, "this little redneck place called Spoonies," where the duo sneaked in the back way. In Ali's telling, Presley went to the microphone with a towel on his head, then pulled it off, and sang, 'You ain't nothin' but a hound dog, cryin' all the time.
NEWS
October 12, 2010 | By John Shiffman, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was one of the nation's largest affirmative-action frauds - $119 million spent on 336 bridge projects, from eastern Pennsylvania interstates to SEPTA's Market-Frankford Line. The conspiracy unfolded over 15 years, unchecked by regulators, as a white-family-run concrete business in Schuylkill County used a Filipino man's minority status to win contract after contract. The sham company, operated from a Connecticut basement, became Pennsylvania's greatest recipient of the U.S. government's disadvantaged-business program.
NEWS
April 23, 2008 | By Maya Rao INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 32-year-old Medford man was arrested yesterday and charged with killing Marianne DeMartin, an Evesham woman who disappeared in 2005, authorities said. Alex James Crow, a convicted sex offender, strangled DeMartin in her condominium, squeezed her body in the trunk of her black 2001 Ford Mustang, and dumped it 120 miles away in a rural area of Schuylkill County, Pa., authorities said. His only motive was to steal a car, Burlington County Prosecutor Robert Bernardi said during a news conference.
NEWS
May 15, 2007 | By Paul Kusko
One cool morning in June, six years ago, I found myself standing in a dewy field with people slathered in sun screen, clad in puffy, multi-colored life vests, listening intently to a river guide describe the protocols of river sojourning. Then, with a circular wave of a canoe paddle held high over his head and a cry of Head 'em out!, I was officially anointed. I was a Schuylkill Sojourner. River sojourns are well-organized, guided, canoe or kayak trips that take place over several days.
NEWS
March 1, 2006 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
No flashy sunglasses and no Armani where Neil Stein is going. And forget about the best burger in America. Stein, credited with sparking the Philadelphia restaurant scene as we know it, is due to report to a federal prison at lunchtime Friday. Stein, 63, who yesterday said he was in great shape "physically" and ready to do his time, was sentenced to one year and a day after pleading guilty to failing to pay taxes on $500,000 he had skimmed from his restaurant empire, which once included Striped Bass, Avenue B and Fishmarket.
NEWS
May 7, 2005 | By Don Sapatkin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The frigid water washed over rocks and crawled up curved banks, as the narrow channel twisted through green trees and grasses. This first navigable stretch looked like a creek, akin to the Wissahickon or Perkiomen. But a map showed the beginnings of a full-fledged river - a blue ribbon of history that powered America from revolutionary times. Up ahead, an explosion of color - red kayaks, green canoes, orange vests - pierced the mist of what was basically a wet, miserable first day for 100 people on the Schuylkill last June.
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