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NEWS
February 2, 2005 | By Alan I. Leshner
At Dover Area High School in York County last week, administrators appeared before ninth-grade biology classes to read a statement. Evolution is no more than a theory, the statement said, and as a way to explain the origin of humans on earth, "intelligent design" theory is just as valid. The statement, approved by the Dover school board, was brief - but the intent is revolutionary. It seeks to discredit the science of evolution, backed by nearly 150 years of research and accepted by an overwhelming majority of scientists worldwide, and to encourage the acceptance of intelligent design, a theory with strong appeal to many religious people, but no backing in actual evidence or in science.
NEWS
January 11, 2006
CHRISTINE M. Flowers' op-ed characterization of science as an evil plot forced on an innocent and unsuspecting citizenry is ludicrous. Science is a systematic method for understanding the world based on observations, experiments and testing. In no sense are scientific ideas "forced down people's throats. " Science is the most unbiased of any human activity. Scientists are literally ruthless in making sure that any proposed ideas are subjected to the most thorough scrutiny and testing before they are accepted.
NEWS
December 5, 1988
Admittedly it was 20-some years ago when we last encountered anthropology (Anthropology 101, Tues.-Thurs, 7:45 a.m., Mr. Taylor, 3 credits), but we seem to recall there was a heavy emphasis on the tribal subcultures of South Seas islands. Apparently a lot has changed in this field. Consider the work James Schaefer of the University of Minnesota described recently at the American Anthropological Association convention. After 10 years of research, Mr. Schaefer and some colleagues have determined that patrons of country and Western bars consume more alcohol than their counterparts in bars that feature hard rock.
NEWS
August 3, 2009
THE BELIEF that a Creator made the universe and now governs it by his providential control should be rationally deduced from what our senses tell us. The steam engine, the telegraph and the telephone, pasteurized milk, the airplane, and even peanut butter were invented by those who believed in God as creator, not to mention the cosmology of such intellectual giants as Newton and Galileo, whose work certainly influenced Einstein and other physicists....
NEWS
January 25, 1987
In his Jan. 13 Op-ed Page article, Rivers Singleton Jr. devalued the support that science can give us in upholding moral values, by presenting the usual confusion of science with technology. Science is consistent with moral values based on humanity. This does not mean that ancient wisdom, religious or not, cannot be accepted and utilized; it implies only that such morality, when accepted, is accepted because of its worth and appropriateness for human beings. Because science supports the basic equality of individuals and requires freedom of speech and expression, it is entirely consistent with the bases for the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.
NEWS
December 24, 2009 | By Steven Newton
From evolution to global warming to vaccines, science is under assault from denialists - those who dismiss well-tested scientific knowledge as merely one of many competing ideologies. Science denial goes beyond skeptical questioning to attack the legitimacy of science itself. Recent foment over stolen e-mails from a British research group inspired an American creationist organization to pronounce that "a cabal of leading scientists, politicians, and media" has sought to "professionally destroy scientists who express skepticism" about climate change.
NEWS
October 21, 2012
The Secret Anarchy of Science By Michael Brooks Overlook. 320 pp. $26.95. Reviewed by John Timpane Science reporting and writing suffer the same malady we've had for years with business writing, or writing about the Internet. Almost everyone who writes about it is either a salesperson, pitching like heck for the home team; a current or former practitioner; or a cheerleader. So you never get a straight deal. With science, it's hard not to cheerlead. Its successes, in technology, engineering, and medicine, are spectacular and world-transforming.
NEWS
April 1, 2005 | By John Rennie
John Rennie is editor in chief of Scientific American Over the years, as the editor of a science magazine, I have received many letters that helpfully pointed out that my colleagues and I are opinionated goons who know nothing about science. They said our magazine needed more balance in its presentation of such issues as creationism, missile defense and global warming. We resisted that advice, and pretended not to be stung by the accusations that the magazine ought to be renamed Unscientific American, or Scientific Un-American, or even Unscientific Un-American.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1796, when Thomas Jefferson was vice president of the United States, he received a shipment of "certain bones" found in a cave in Virginia. The bones and three claws, from an unknown creature, proved tremendously exciting to Jefferson, who at the time was also president of the American Philosophical Society, the nation's premier scientific association, founded in 1743 in Philadelphia by Benjamin Franklin. Examining the enormous claws, Jefferson became convinced they were concrete evidence that his young nation harbored lions more fierce than anything known to the Old World.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Lauren McCutcheon, Daily News Staff Writer
David George Gordon, author of The Eat-a-Bug Cookbook, offers tips on how to (and how not to) cook with insects. He'll be on hand to answer questions at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University's Bug Fest , Aug. 8 and 9, 11 a.m. to noon and 3 to 5 p.m. His insect cooking show starts at 1 p.m. 1. Buy, don't scavenge. The backyard and basement are not the best places to source insect-ingredients. "The big problem is pesticides. If the bugs have been eating pesticides, you can become a bioaccumulator and wind up storing all that pesticide in your body.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Paul McCartney keeps a piano bedside to try out musical ideas that come to him in the middle of the night. Screenwriter Aaron Sorkin ( The West Wing , Sports Night ) overcomes writer's block by taking six or more showers a day. And John Kounios, a pioneer in the study of insight, rides the quiet Regional Rail car on his commute to and from his West Chester home so he can carve out a creative, idea-inducing space for himself. The Drexel University professor of psychology further isolates himself by donning noise-canceling Bose headphones (to block the rumble of the train)
SPORTS
July 1, 2015 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
THERE ARE few things in life that pique the interest of 76ers coach Brett Brown as much as basketball. One of those, however, is his obsession with sports science. Yesterday, the team announced that it has hired Dr. David T. Martin as director of performance research and development. He joins the Sixers from his senior sports science position at the renowned Australian Institute of Sports. Brown has a long history of coaching in Australia, including serving as the head coach of the Australian Olympic team.
SPORTS
June 22, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most NBA draft classes have them: the cautionary tale, the European bust, the college all-American who couldn't cut it, the late first-rounders who outperformed their draft order. The 2011 draft has all that in multiples. Now that it can be judged a little more fairly, if not completely, the 2011 draft is a reminder that mock drafts sometimes need to be mocked and day-after report cards need to be graded later. Looking back at 2011, you can see how a team of the players selected between 11 and 20 might beat a team of those drafted one through 10. That's without one of the best players in that class who was selected 30th, the final pick of the first round.
NEWS
June 16, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Diagonally across from the Walter Rand Transportation Center in Camden, a small strip of storefronts and restaurants attracts a steady stream of people in and out to get fried chicken, look at new cellphones, buy clothing. The scene is set to be replaced with a different sort of bustle as state authorities last week granted preliminary approval to $50 million for a new health sciences building. Stretching from Broadway west to Fifth Street and from Martin Luther King Boulevard south to Stevens Street, the Joint Health Sciences Center and related buildings are meant to bring together Rowan University, Rutgers-Camden, and other medical and educational institutions in the city for teaching and research.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University City Science Center's monolithic office buildings will be joined to a new zone featuring pedestrian-friendly shopping streets, apartment towers, and a sprawling public plaza as part of the West Philadelphia business incubation and research complex's plan to more than double in size. Wexford Science and Technology, which is developing the new site, said Thursday that its goal in the $1 billion project is to break up the long, unbroken blocks of offices and institutional structures where the expansion will occur while mixing in other uses.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University City Science Center plans to more than double its size over 10 years as it seeks to lure higher-profile biomedical and technology firms to the West Philadelphia business incubation and research complex. The Science Center and its development partner on the expansion, Wexford Science & Technology, will pool their landholdings in the area to build more than four million square feet of offices, laboratories, homes, retail shops, and parking structures, the Science Center said Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2015
The long: Vomit, mucus, poop and blood are the four foul-ish pillars of this long-traveling, book-based, carnival-cartoony, summer-only exhibition. Slime, however, is the leitmotif. Opens Saturday; here through Aug. 30. The short: Flies barf before eating and then eat their barf. The demo: Toilet-humor aficionados of all ages. (Colorful animated characters appeal to ages 3 to 7; toots and burps give elementary schoolers the giggles.) The book: Sylvia Branzei and Jack Keely's best-selling series gets animated via lovably slimy hagfish, fill-up mosquitoes, and red, yellow, blue and clear blood.
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