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NEWS
February 2, 2005 | By Alan I. Leshner
At Dover Area High School in York County last week, administrators appeared before ninth-grade biology classes to read a statement. Evolution is no more than a theory, the statement said, and as a way to explain the origin of humans on earth, "intelligent design" theory is just as valid. The statement, approved by the Dover school board, was brief - but the intent is revolutionary. It seeks to discredit the science of evolution, backed by nearly 150 years of research and accepted by an overwhelming majority of scientists worldwide, and to encourage the acceptance of intelligent design, a theory with strong appeal to many religious people, but no backing in actual evidence or in science.
NEWS
January 11, 2006
CHRISTINE M. Flowers' op-ed characterization of science as an evil plot forced on an innocent and unsuspecting citizenry is ludicrous. Science is a systematic method for understanding the world based on observations, experiments and testing. In no sense are scientific ideas "forced down people's throats. " Science is the most unbiased of any human activity. Scientists are literally ruthless in making sure that any proposed ideas are subjected to the most thorough scrutiny and testing before they are accepted.
NEWS
December 5, 1988
Admittedly it was 20-some years ago when we last encountered anthropology (Anthropology 101, Tues.-Thurs, 7:45 a.m., Mr. Taylor, 3 credits), but we seem to recall there was a heavy emphasis on the tribal subcultures of South Seas islands. Apparently a lot has changed in this field. Consider the work James Schaefer of the University of Minnesota described recently at the American Anthropological Association convention. After 10 years of research, Mr. Schaefer and some colleagues have determined that patrons of country and Western bars consume more alcohol than their counterparts in bars that feature hard rock.
NEWS
August 3, 2009
THE BELIEF that a Creator made the universe and now governs it by his providential control should be rationally deduced from what our senses tell us. The steam engine, the telegraph and the telephone, pasteurized milk, the airplane, and even peanut butter were invented by those who believed in God as creator, not to mention the cosmology of such intellectual giants as Newton and Galileo, whose work certainly influenced Einstein and other physicists....
NEWS
January 25, 1987
In his Jan. 13 Op-ed Page article, Rivers Singleton Jr. devalued the support that science can give us in upholding moral values, by presenting the usual confusion of science with technology. Science is consistent with moral values based on humanity. This does not mean that ancient wisdom, religious or not, cannot be accepted and utilized; it implies only that such morality, when accepted, is accepted because of its worth and appropriateness for human beings. Because science supports the basic equality of individuals and requires freedom of speech and expression, it is entirely consistent with the bases for the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.
NEWS
December 24, 2009 | By Steven Newton
From evolution to global warming to vaccines, science is under assault from denialists - those who dismiss well-tested scientific knowledge as merely one of many competing ideologies. Science denial goes beyond skeptical questioning to attack the legitimacy of science itself. Recent foment over stolen e-mails from a British research group inspired an American creationist organization to pronounce that "a cabal of leading scientists, politicians, and media" has sought to "professionally destroy scientists who express skepticism" about climate change.
NEWS
October 21, 2012
The Secret Anarchy of Science By Michael Brooks Overlook. 320 pp. $26.95. Reviewed by John Timpane Science reporting and writing suffer the same malady we've had for years with business writing, or writing about the Internet. Almost everyone who writes about it is either a salesperson, pitching like heck for the home team; a current or former practitioner; or a cheerleader. So you never get a straight deal. With science, it's hard not to cheerlead. Its successes, in technology, engineering, and medicine, are spectacular and world-transforming.
NEWS
April 1, 2005 | By John Rennie
John Rennie is editor in chief of Scientific American Over the years, as the editor of a science magazine, I have received many letters that helpfully pointed out that my colleagues and I are opinionated goons who know nothing about science. They said our magazine needed more balance in its presentation of such issues as creationism, missile defense and global warming. We resisted that advice, and pretended not to be stung by the accusations that the magazine ought to be renamed Unscientific American, or Scientific Un-American, or even Unscientific Un-American.
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NEWS
September 15, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
Construction on a proposed "health sciences" campus in downtown Camden is still nine months away, but an expansion already is being planned. The joint "Rowan University/Rutgers-Camden Board of Governors" has torn down the block diagonally across from the Walter Rand Transportation Center — from South Fifth Street to Broadway and Martin Luther King Boulevard to Stevens Street — to put up a main health sciences building . Now it's begun...
NEWS
September 6, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Bradley Dyer and his colleagues at All Star Pediatrics in Exton refuse to care for refusers. "If you should absolutely refuse to vaccinate your child despite all our efforts, we will ask you to find another health-care provider," reads the policy given to parents. "Please recognize that by not vaccinating, you are putting your child at unnecessary risk for life-threatening illness and disability, and even death. " Esther K. Chung's group, meanwhile, never gives up on refusers.
NEWS
August 24, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
Elementary and middle school students did slightly better on average than last year on the math and English language portions of the 2016 Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA), but worse in science. This is the second year for more rigorous exams that align with Pennsylvania Core Standards in English and math. The science test is unchanged. Overall, 42.45 percent of students scored proficient or advanced in math - a 2.5 percentage point increase over last year, according to Casey Smith, a spokesperson for the state Department of Education.
NEWS
August 20, 2016
By Bill Sigmund and Frederic Bertley This summer, Pokémon Go wasn't the only thing engaging the minds and imaginations of youngsters across the Philadelphia region. Anyone within earshot of a local library would have encountered the joyful sounds of children having a raucous good time, all the while building essential educational skills. So what were they up to? For the 30th year, area students in grades two through six were participating in GSK Science in the Summer, a free education program that reaches more than 5,000 kids in our region.
NEWS
August 5, 2016
By Paul Halpern Conventional wisdom suggests that Philadelphia is known for wisdom at conventions - particularly the ones that shaped our nation in the 18th century. Visitors flock to the city to see Independence Hall, Congress Hall, Carpenters' Hall, and other places where the Founding Fathers convened to debate the direction of American democracy. The Liberty Bell, perhaps the city's most famous attraction, symbolizes that fledgling era and its emerging freedoms. One of the reasons that the contemporary Democratic convention was set here was to tap into that rich tradition.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, CULTURAL WRITER
No one was more fascinated by the rich variety of native languages than Thomas Jefferson. He dispatched countless deputies to the wilderness to gather vocabularies and document speech. One of the key tasks for Lewis and Clark on their great expedition was to detail and map their encounters with native tongues, which resounded across the continent by the hundreds. Jefferson saw these languages as uniquely American, praised their rhythms and their sounds - and predicted their inevitable extinction.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Mari Schaefer, Staff Writer
Delaware County Community College graduates are now able to seamlessly transfer to Pennsylvania State University under a recently announced agreement. Students with majors in bachelor of science in biology or business, and bachelor of arts or science in psychology, and have a minimum grade-point average of 2.0 are eligible. Application fees to the university also will be waived, according to officials. Officials noted that Penn State Brandywine in Media, offers the eligible majors and is located close to the DCCC main campus in Marple Township.
NEWS
August 5, 2016
By Andrew F. Read The doctor tried antibiotic after antibiotic, but the bacteria in the woman's body continued to proliferate. With only two drugs left, the doctor asked for my advice. An evolutionary biologist collaborating with the physician to study antibiotic resistance, I suggested he use both drugs simultaneously. I reasoned that since the two drugs had different modes of action, more mutations would be required for the bacteria to generate resistance to both drugs. In truth, we had no idea what to do, and there wasn't enough justification to go with my theory.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2016
Reinvestment Fund, a Philadelphia nonprofit rebuilding distressed towns and cities through the use of capital and information, has named Saul A. Behar to its board. He is vice president and general counsel at the University City Science Center. The City Avenue Special Services District has elected Kevin Michaels and Mark C. Reed to its board. They replace C. Kevin Gillespie and Lita Cohen. Michaels, managing partner at Cross Properties, is a major property owner in the district.
NEWS
July 24, 2016
Edited by Ann and Jeff VanderMeer Vintage. 1,216 pp. $25. Reviewed by Jim Higgins Surprisingly, the literary spirit that haunts Ann and Jeff VanderMeer's massive new anthology, The Big Book of Science Fiction , isn't Arthur C. Clarke or Isaac Asimov or even H.G. Wells. It's Jorge Luis Borges, the creator of miniature fables of humans' grappling with their double-edged longing for and terror of infinity and omniscience. He's represented by a signature story, name-checked in another one, and appears to influence several more.
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