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Science Education

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NEWS
April 30, 1993 | By Jim Detjen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Merck & Co. Inc. announced yesterday that it is setting up a nonprofit institute that will spend $20 million over the next 10 years to improve science education in Pennsylvania and New Jersey public schools. The Merck Institute for Science Education will be based in Rahway, N.J. Its funding will come from the Merck foundation. The institute will focus much of its efforts on improving science education from kindergarten through eighth grades at four school districts. These include the North Penn School District in West Point, Montgomery County, and districts in Rahway, Linden and Readington Township, N.J. "Students need to be motivated in the early grades in order to pursue scientific careers," said P. Roy Vagelos, Merck's chairman and chief executive officer.
NEWS
July 6, 1986 | By Richard Saltus, Boston Globe
Less than 30 years after Sputnik shocked the United States into a nationwide drive to upgrade science education, the effort has long since waned, and evidence is accumulating of a new and graver science teaching crisis in U.S. schools and colleges. The Soviet Union's 1957 success in orbiting the world's first artificial satellite shook America's confidence in its technological and scientific primacy. One result was President John F. Kennedy's pledge in 1961 to put a man on the moon by the end of the decade.
NEWS
April 11, 2008 | By Chad Holliday Jr. and Graham B. Spanier
If proof is needed that it's easier to talk the talk than walk the walk, look no further than our federal government's support for U.S. competitiveness in the global economy. In his State of the Union address two years ago, President Bush announced the American Competitiveness Initiative "to encourage innovation throughout our economy, and to give our nation's children a firm grounding in math and science. " Upon passage last year of landmark legislation authorizing increased funding for math and science education and scientific research, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D., Calif.
NEWS
October 9, 2003 | By Connie Langland INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An ongoing effort to improve the quality of math instruction in grades 6 to 12 in the Philadelphia region has gotten a boost - a $12.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation. The aim of the grant is to upgrade math and science education in 46 school districts over the next five years, according to Joseph Merlino, director of the Greater Philadelphia Secondary Mathematics Project at La Salle University. The effort could reach an estimated 117,000 students annually, Merlino said Tuesday.
NEWS
March 6, 1991 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
James Lawrence Powell, 54, the new chief executive officer and president of the Franklin Institute, says he sometimes wishes that he had become a fourth- grade teacher. A geologist and the current president of Reed College in Portland, Ore., Powell will have ample opportunity to fulfill such longings in his new job as chief of a museum visited by more schoolchildren than any other in Pennsylvania. Powell, who used to invite grade-school children into his classrooms when he was a geology professor at Oberlin College in Ohio, said, "I'm going to be back helping fourth graders learn about science, and to me that's a wonderfully rewarding capstone to my career.
NEWS
March 20, 2010 | By Elisa Lala INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 10,000 teachers are in Philadelphia to try to persuade the nation that science is important. The city is the site through tomorrow of the 58th annual National Conference on Science Education, with educators from as far away as China and Britain networking, sharing teaching secrets, and boasting about the role of science in the classroom. The four-day event comes two months after President Obama proposed his "Educate to Innovate" campaign to improve the participation of U.S. students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.
NEWS
November 17, 1992 | By Gail Gibson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Four school districts that operate in the shadows of Merck & Co. Inc.'s headquarters have been promised 10 years of financial and training support from the giant pharmaceutical company. Formalized this fall, the Merck Institute for Science Education will focus on improving math and science education in the targeted districts. In turn, director Carlo Parravano expects those districts to serve as models for classrooms across the country. In Pennsylvania, the North Penn School District, located near Merck's domestic headquarters in West Point, Montgomery County, is participating.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | By Gene D'Alessandro, Special to The Inquirer
"Whelmers" and "eye-poppers" will abound this week at the Oakmont Elementary School as the Mr. Wizard program and its wacky world of science visit the Haverford Township school. The nationally known science program, popularized on television, will be in residence at Oakmont School tomorrow through Friday. On Tuesday night, it will put on for the public "An Evening of Whelmers and Poppers" at Haverford High School. Since the 1950s, the Mr. Wizard program has regaled both children and adults with a unique blend of science education and entertainment.
NEWS
November 17, 2014 | By Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ronald Earl Rowe, 77, of Glenside, a longtime science teacher, died Monday, Nov. 10, at Abington Memorial Hospital after a four-year battle with cancer. Born Oct. 29, 1937, Mr. Rowe was raised in West York, Pa., and graduated from West York High School in 1955. In 1959, he graduated from Millersville State Teachers College, now Millersville University, with a bachelor's degree in science education. Mr. Rowe went on to pursue his master's degree in teaching from Cornell University and graduated in 1963.
NEWS
June 26, 2000 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Montgomery County teacher was one of only four teachers in the state recognized by the National Science Foundation with its Presidential Award for Excellence in Teaching. Judy Achor Miller, a gifted support teacher at Bridle Path Elementary School in Lansdale, received a $7,500 educational grant last week to enhance the science and math programs at Bridle Path. One elementary and one secondary teacher for science and one elementary and one secondary teacher for math were selected from each state.
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NEWS
February 6, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JOHN C. GRAHAM was able to find humor just about anywhere, even amid the horrors of war. As a soldier in World War II, he participated in the disastrous invasion of Anzio in Italy in 1944, in which American and British troops were trapped by German defenders for five months before they could break out. John Graham kept a diary, which, being an artist, he illustrated. He wrote about foxhole living, how to make a radio out of a potato, and how it was important to keep your lips in shape if you were a bugler, which he was for a time.
NEWS
November 17, 2014 | By Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ronald Earl Rowe, 77, of Glenside, a longtime science teacher, died Monday, Nov. 10, at Abington Memorial Hospital after a four-year battle with cancer. Born Oct. 29, 1937, Mr. Rowe was raised in West York, Pa., and graduated from West York High School in 1955. In 1959, he graduated from Millersville State Teachers College, now Millersville University, with a bachelor's degree in science education. Mr. Rowe went on to pursue his master's degree in teaching from Cornell University and graduated in 1963.
NEWS
September 24, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF YOU COULD not develop a passion for microbiology, you would have been advised to stay away from Norm Willett. "Norm is the consummate microbiologist," a colleague once said. "He loves microbiology. " Not only did he love it, he wanted other people to love it, too. "His enthusiasm for communicating it to everyone, no matter what their status - student, colleague or administrator - is evident in even short conversations," Toby K. Eisenstein, professor of microbiology and immunology at the Temple University School of Medicine, said in a tribute to Norm.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Under the rapt stares of about 100 children and a statue of Benjamin Franklin, a staff member at the Franklin Institute poured liquid nitrogen into a bucket of water. A cloud mushroomed out over the sides and raced toward the youngsters. "Wow!" a chorus of surprised and delighted children squealed, reaching out to touch the indoor cloud. A few hundred more children scurried through the institute's famous heart and new brain exhibits Saturday, when the museum opened to more than 1,400 people free of charge.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2014 | BY MATT NESTOR, Daily News Staff Writer nestorm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
THE FRANKLIN Institute has expanded its commitment to science education and made space for world-class traveling exhibits in the process, thanks to the new three-story Karabots Pavilion, opening Saturday. The addition will kick off with a "brain party" to celebrate its main attraction, "Your Brain," a permanent exhibit on the pavilion's second floor. But while all the sensation runs through the brain, it's only part of the opening day itinerary. The first 500 visitors can experience the Institute's new furnishings and a rare gallery of 80 scientific artifacts for free, while the rest must pay normal admission prices.
NEWS
November 26, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial service will be held Saturday, Nov. 30, for Jan Winston Long, 94, of Kennett Square, a longtime teacher who died Wednesday, Oct. 30, of congestive heart failure at Kendal at Longwood. The service will be at 2 p.m. at Kendal, a retirement community at 1109 E. Baltimore Pike, Kennett Square. From 1946 to 1985, Mr. Long was a teacher at Westtown School, a Quaker boarding school in West Chester. He taught math and earth sciences, was a dorm parent, and also coached track and cross-country.
NEWS
October 5, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the third day of the federal government shutdown, the people who run an important regional science-education center began to get worried. About paying their rent. Making payroll. About their ability to pay the hotel bills of the expert they dispatched to Egypt to help that troubled land revise its entire education system. The 21st Century Partnership for STEM Education, a nonprofit research agency whose work influences schools across the Philadelphia region, gets 92 percent of its funding from the federal government.
NEWS
August 12, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Being a Temple University professor and then a dean at Fairleigh Dickinson University apparently was not enough for Frank X. Sutman. He needed classroom interludes far, far away. "This started with India in 1967," when Mr. Sutman spent the summer there with future science teachers, his son, Frank J., said. "He always had a fascination for travel and learning about people from other cultures," his son said. On Saturday, Aug. 3, Mr. Sutman, 85, died of pneumonia at his home in Linwood, N.J., where he had lived since 1998.
NEWS
January 16, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
When Bob Wanton began his career in the 1960s, meteorologists really did need to keep their eyes on the sky. Simply scanning a computer screen? Please. "I had to go outside every hour to do an observation," says Wanton, 68, who retired last year after 46 years with the National Weather Service. His first office, at what's now Atlantic City International Airport, was in a World War II-era Quonset hut. Not exactly high-tech, but perfect for accessing the elements. "I logged everything on a form," recalls the Lindenwold resident and grandfather of three.
NEWS
October 10, 2012
The Franklin Institute has won seven federal grants, totaling more than $9 million, that will support science education and community outreach in the Philadelphia area, the institute has reported. The grants include five National Science Foundation-funded projects, a NASA grant, and a federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) award. The NSF grants include: $5.8 million to promote climate-change education among urban residents; $1.9 million ($330,346 to the institute) for the Science Festival Alliance, a collaborative effort to expand and sustain science festivals nationwide; $993,705 for a project to engage children in after-school science programs; and $815,123 for LEAP into Science: Engaging Diverse Community Partners in Science and Literacy, a joint effort with the Free Library to augment an existing program focused on children's literature and science.
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