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Science Lab

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NEWS
June 18, 1992 | By Michelle R. Davis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Teachers, students and parents urged the Haverford school board last week to restore the double science lab period, which the board had scaled back in a cost-saving move in its preliminary 1992-93 budget. The overwhelming complaint was that by reducing lab time to a single period at Haverford High School, the board would cause students to miss out on valuable learning experiences. The board gave tentative approval to a $36.8 million budget May 21 that would save the district $84,500 by cutting back the double science lab period to a single period.
NEWS
October 17, 1997 | By Lubna Khan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For science teacher Maurine Falcone, the first payoff was the pasta bridges. Students at Great Valley High School studying building design wondered who had the strongest bridge, and Falcone devised a scientific experiment to test their boasts. Using a box-shaped sensor that attaches to a computer, she helped students measure how much force each bridge could withstand. This field experiment with lab equipment was an example of what Falcone hopes to accomplish with the 1997-98 Christa McAuliffe Teacher Fellowship.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | By Andrew Hussie, Special to The Inquirer
A Cheltenham Township student has been charged with putting isopropyl alcohol into a teachers' pot of coffee at Cedarbrook Middle School. The student, a 13-year-old boy, surrendered last week at the Cheltenham Police administration building, where he was charged as a juvenile with aggravated assault and reckless endangerment. He was referred to Montgomery County juvenile authorities and released to his parents, police said. The boy's name was withheld. A police spokesman said the incident occurred during the morning of Feb. 28 in the school's science lab, where the student was taking a makeup exam.
NEWS
September 9, 1990 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Looking across the schoolyard at the children in their new back-to-school outfits, art teacher Susan Salvino noticed differences among the students at Media-Providence Friends School. "Some students' personalities are exactly the same as last year," Salvino said, "while others seem like totally new people. " Her observations of changes and constants also apply to the school's facilities. For the first time since 1919, the Media school has expanded, adding three classrooms for sixth, seventh and eighth graders; a science lab; a gym, and more library space in late June.
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Indian Lane Elementary School was all dressed up and ready to go Wednesday, much to the relief of 552 students and their parents. "We're up and running," said Dick Dunlap, principal of the newly renovated Middletown school. "We've met our deadline. " For the last year, contractors have worked under a tight deadline to transform the former junior high school into a state-of-the-art elementary school, with a computer and a television in each classroom. The renovation cost $9 million.
NEWS
January 22, 1989 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
A close bond has developed between the sixth-grade pupils at Glenside- Weldon Elementary School and their minuscule pets. The school's science lab was bustling Friday morning as the pupils were counting, classifying and separating by sex and traits hundreds of fruit flies, nurtured in plastic vials filled with yeast and blue powdered food. Whitney Hickson walked up to her teacher, Susan Volp, and asked how to create the right habitat inside a plastic vial for a second group of flies.
NEWS
March 7, 1999 | By Shannon O'Boye, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Many of the students at the Coriell Institute Science Fair fidgeted as they stood next to their poster projects and cast nervous, sideways glances at approaching judges. Though their awkward appearance revealed their young age, the breadth and scope of the experiments conducted by these 350 students pointed to their sharp wits and budding intellects. Nearly 70 judges paced the Camden County College gymnasium yesterday, taking in research and experiments conducted in areas such as botany, engineering, mathematics and medicine.
NEWS
March 10, 2002 | By Gaiutra Bahadur INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A model student, the daughter of a Nobel Prize-winning virologist and a federal judge, stands accused of burning down a science lab, an act that prosecutors say was motivated by anger after receiving a B- grade in a lifetime of A's. For the last two months, teams of high school students from across Pennsylvania have been arguing this case of a disgruntled achiever in the fictional realm of Temple County before bona fide judges, with local lawyers...
NEWS
March 13, 2005 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A trail of first graders holding tightly onto petri dishes followed Sister Mary McNulty down the halls of St. Ephrem School in Bensalem. "She's great. She takes us to the science lab," young scientist Nolan Crane said. "She says 'hi' to us in our classroom. " After the recent lesson on bacteria, St. Ephrem's principal popped into a sixth-grade class stymied by division of decimals. She worked through a problem with them, then said, "I will be back to see if you have it up here," pointing to her head.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | By Michele M. Fizzano, Special to The Inquirer
It's not easy to find the Sarah W. Starkweather Elementary School. Granted, it sits in plain view, high atop a hill, perched along a major highway. But from the road, the barn-red siding and brick structure looks more homey than scholastic, more like a townhouse than a school. There is little about Starkweather, the first new West Chester elementary school since 1976, that is traditional. Not the rolling hill setting, not the building itself and not the attitudes of the teachers, students and principal.
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NEWS
March 19, 2012 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
THE CITY HAS STRUGGLED for years to redevelop the once-glorious Divine Lorraine hotel, a vacant, graffitti-covered, modern-day ruin viewed as the pivotal obstacle in the rebirth of North Broad Street Now, developer Eric Blumenfeld is feverishly working with a local artist to turn the land behind the hotel - and the Divine herself - into a centerpiece that would reimagine both art and public education in the area just north of Center City....
NEWS
October 18, 2011 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The roof leaks badly. Parts of the building are shut off because of water damage. There is asbestos contamination on the fourth floor, and chunks of plaster scattered on the beautiful, crumbling second floor of the auditorium. Furness High, built in 1914, would cost $26 million to repair or $51 million to replace, and that's money the cash-strapped Philadelphia School District doesn't have. While it may land on a list of district buildings slated for closure, Furness' growing academic success means that the school could be around for years to come.
NEWS
November 8, 2010 | By Luke Harold, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a Central High School science lab - with her teacher and 30 classmates huddled around - freshman Mjaan McIvor pointed a camping lighter toward a single marshmallow Peep. The jack-o'-lantern-shaped Peep was sitting on top of an inch-tall stand and inside a six-inch metal cylinder with a beaker of water placed above it. After some difficulty igniting the lighter, McIvor succeeded in setting the Peep on fire. It was a visual, personal, hands-on science experiment - the kind of interactive approach that teacher K.D. Davenport believes will leave her students with a deeper understanding of nutrition.
NEWS
April 30, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Inside the science lab, the visitor leaned forward, listening to teenagers describe their work - a biodiesel project, a windmill, distillation systems that may be used to purify water in Sierra Leone someday. The world's most famous tech geek turned philanthropist had lots of questions for the students at Science Leadership Academy (SLA) - how long does that take to boil water? Why did you use this material? What's better about metal? "It's great to see people doing hands-on science," Bill Gates said after the presentations were over.
NEWS
September 18, 2009 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cole Hamels stood in the doorway of Allen Pinkney's Stetson Middle School classroom yesterday morning, eyes fixed on a music teacher belting out an aria. "Amazing," the Phillies pitcher whispered to his wife, Heidi. When Pinkney finished, the couple cheered and clapped. "I brought my husband to see you, Mr. Pinkney," Heidi Hamels said. Then, turning to Cole, she added: "I told them you sing like a dead bird. " The room erupted in laughter, but it was pretty clear that no one minded Cole Hamels' lack of singing skills.
NEWS
March 13, 2005 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A trail of first graders holding tightly onto petri dishes followed Sister Mary McNulty down the halls of St. Ephrem School in Bensalem. "She's great. She takes us to the science lab," young scientist Nolan Crane said. "She says 'hi' to us in our classroom. " After the recent lesson on bacteria, St. Ephrem's principal popped into a sixth-grade class stymied by division of decimals. She worked through a problem with them, then said, "I will be back to see if you have it up here," pointing to her head.
NEWS
April 17, 2003 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The people of Lead are big fans of neutrinos. Each of the last two Mays, they have celebrated Neutrino Day, raising banners in honor of the mysterious subatomic particle. They selected a Miss Neutrino. "I even make a neutrino pizza," said Jeff Snedeker, owner of the PizzaLab restaurant and auto-body shop. (It's topped with sun-dried tomatoes and olives.) "We're probably the only town in the world where everyone knows what a neutrino is," said Phyllis Fleming, manager of Lead's historic opera house.
NEWS
March 10, 2002 | By Gaiutra Bahadur INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A model student, the daughter of a Nobel Prize-winning virologist and a federal judge, stands accused of burning down a science lab, an act that prosecutors say was motivated by anger after receiving a B- grade in a lifetime of A's. For the last two months, teams of high school students from across Pennsylvania have been arguing this case of a disgruntled achiever in the fictional realm of Temple County before bona fide judges, with local lawyers...
NEWS
March 7, 1999 | By Shannon O'Boye, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Many of the students at the Coriell Institute Science Fair fidgeted as they stood next to their poster projects and cast nervous, sideways glances at approaching judges. Though their awkward appearance revealed their young age, the breadth and scope of the experiments conducted by these 350 students pointed to their sharp wits and budding intellects. Nearly 70 judges paced the Camden County College gymnasium yesterday, taking in research and experiments conducted in areas such as botany, engineering, mathematics and medicine.
NEWS
March 22, 1998 | By David Hafetz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The local school district celebrated the long-awaited opening of five new science laboratories on Wednesday, part of a $1.8 million new-technology project. Ceremonies were attended by parents and state and local officials. Below is an account of the visits to Hawthorne Park, Martin Luther King, Twin Hills, Bookbinder and Pennypacker Park Elementary Schools. 9:15 a.m., Hawthorne Park Elementary School: A robot with a plastic juice bottle for a head and a cardboard box for a body guarded the entrance to the new science lab. Inside, Hawthorne Park students watched parents and education officials fumble with a piece of black wire, a battery and a lightbulb.
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