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Science Teachers

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NEWS
October 30, 1994 | By Wendy Greenberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
About two dozen science teachers will hold classes next week, but the students will not be children. Instead, their students will be teachers - the more than 600 participants in workshops beginning Nov. 7 in Rohm & Haas Co.'s seventh annual Delaware Valley Science Week. The subject will be creative ways of imparting information on water purification, insects, adhesives and light polarization. The program, aimed at improving science education in the region, will take place at various locations, including Gwynedd-Mercy College in Lower Gwynedd from Nov. 9 to 11. The workshops will include presentations developed at the Project LABS (Learning About Basic Science)
NEWS
November 16, 1986 | By Julia M. Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a few minutes past midnight, and the liquid nitrogen was flying yesterday at the Franklin Institute. "They don't sell six-packs of this in 7-Eleven," joked museum intern Marty Hoban, as he nonchalantly shrank brass, deflated balloons and cracked a rubber ball to the "oohs" and "ahs" of onlookers. Just moments before, it was champagne that was flowing, as dozens of night denizens of the museum streamed up to the roof to gaze at the lights of Philadelphia and the murky midnight sky. "I can't believe it - I saw Orion," said Joe Walder, pointing out a luminous belt of stars to his colleague, Rachelle Murray.
NEWS
December 9, 2012 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey is partnering with a foundation to recruit and train as many as 100 new math and science teachers to spend three years in high-need schools across the state, including ones in Camden and Pemberton Borough. The initiative, announced Friday by Gov. Christie, will cost $9 million, all of it donated. Teaching recruits will have backgrounds in science, technology, engineering and math - the so-called STEM subjects - and will be trained in a model created by the Princeton-based Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation emphasizing teacher preparation and retention.
NEWS
October 7, 2005 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dover High School science teachers were so outraged by a decision to introduce what they said was Bible-based creationism into biology class that they refused to read a mandatory statement to their students promoting the idea, according to two science faculty members testifying in a federal trial over the teaching of evolution. The teachers said the curriculum change approved last year required that students be presented with intelligent design as an alternative to Darwin's theory of evolution.
NEWS
July 14, 1994 | By Wendy Greenberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Flat, open and shadeless. For outdoor science lessons, teachers Tanya Neuman and Louise Kirsh figured the schoolyard at General Nash Elementary School was a bust. Neuman, who teaches third grade, and Kirsh, a first-grade teacher, see the sunny schoolyard in a different light now. The North Penn teachers' perception of their school's nearby environment changed during a recent two-week workshop, Schoolyard Ecology for Elementary School Teachers, run by Moravian College in Bethlehem.
NEWS
December 8, 1995 | For The Inquirer / LAURENCE KESTERSON
State Secretary of Education Eugene Hickok Jr. touted Gov. Ridge's education plan yesterday before 75 science teachers from 45 public schools at a Widener University Science Symposium at the Concordville Hotel. Hickok said charter schools for science would bring teachers, parents and businesses together toward a common education goal. The teachers received his remarks with mild applause.
NEWS
July 23, 2009 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two kindergarten teachers from the Lumberton and Abington School Districts have won the nation's highest award for childhood math education. Kimberly Mueller of the F.L. Walther School in Lumberton and Anne Magaha of Rydal West Elementary School are among 87 recipients of the 2008 Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching, the National Science Foundation announced yesterday. Forty-one science teachers and 46 math teachers were chosen. The awards alternate yearly between teachers of kindergarten through sixth grade, and seventh grade through high school.
NEWS
April 30, 1993 | By Jim Detjen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Merck & Co. Inc. announced yesterday that it is setting up a nonprofit institute that will spend $20 million over the next 10 years to improve science education in Pennsylvania and New Jersey public schools. The Merck Institute for Science Education will be based in Rahway, N.J. Its funding will come from the Merck foundation. The institute will focus much of its efforts on improving science education from kindergarten through eighth grades at four school districts. These include the North Penn School District in West Point, Montgomery County, and districts in Rahway, Linden and Readington Township, N.J. "Students need to be motivated in the early grades in order to pursue scientific careers," said P. Roy Vagelos, Merck's chairman and chief executive officer.
NEWS
November 8, 2010 | By Luke Harold, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a Central High School science lab - with her teacher and 30 classmates huddled around - freshman Mjaan McIvor pointed a camping lighter toward a single marshmallow Peep. The jack-o'-lantern-shaped Peep was sitting on top of an inch-tall stand and inside a six-inch metal cylinder with a beaker of water placed above it. After some difficulty igniting the lighter, McIvor succeeded in setting the Peep on fire. It was a visual, personal, hands-on science experiment - the kind of interactive approach that teacher K.D. Davenport believes will leave her students with a deeper understanding of nutrition.
NEWS
September 20, 1992 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Now that students at Octorara Intermediate School are back in the classroom, they might like to know that one of their science teachers spent part of his summer in the classroom. Anthony DiSipio, who teaches the eighth grade at the Atglen school, worked with Al Breaux, a research scientist in Rohm & Haas Co.'s Analytical Research Division, performing experiments with agricultural chemicals. The experiments are part of the company's summer program called Learning About Basic Science (LABS)
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NEWS
May 17, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Joseph Paul Diviny, 89, a longtime science teacher in Philadelphia's public schools, died Monday, May 9, of esophageal cancer at his home in Mayfair. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Diviny worked as a boy in the 1930s selling fruit and vegetables from a horse-drawn cart on the streets of Kensington. "One of his favorite tasks was to feed the horse a carrot at lunchtime. His grandchildren marveled at this recollection of much simpler times in Philadelphia," his family said in a remembrance.
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
A LOT OF urban kids resist getting into environmental studies because creeks and woods and the creepy crawly creatures that live in them are alien to them. "They don't want to sit in the dirt; they don't want to sit in the grass; they don't want to hold an earthworm," a teacher once said. But Phyllis Green's students at the Turner Middle School got acclimated fast as they squished in the mud on the banks of Cobbs Creek. In fact, Phyllis's students focused on restoring the creek, a body of sluggish water that has known the ravages of urban civilization, pollution and other disruptions through the years and sorely needed tender loving care.
NEWS
November 17, 2014 | By Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ronald Earl Rowe, 77, of Glenside, a longtime science teacher, died Monday, Nov. 10, at Abington Memorial Hospital after a four-year battle with cancer. Born Oct. 29, 1937, Mr. Rowe was raised in West York, Pa., and graduated from West York High School in 1955. In 1959, he graduated from Millersville State Teachers College, now Millersville University, with a bachelor's degree in science education. Mr. Rowe went on to pursue his master's degree in teaching from Cornell University and graduated in 1963.
NEWS
September 17, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
The phone rang. Seated at the desk, the petite woman with salt-and-pepper curls took a deep breath and reached for the receiver, game for the challenge. "Hello, Central High School," she said brightly. "May I help you?" She furrowed her brow. "Can you repeat the name?" She followed her finger, poring over the directory of the school's staff and faculty. "Do you know what department he's in? Oh. OK. " Anxious now, she searched the list again, top to bottom, bottom to top, then apologized.
NEWS
May 27, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
At Roxborough High School in Philadelphia, teachers and staff use a school washer and dryer to clean the clothes of needy students. Learning and laundry, in fact, get done in several area schools, where teachers and staff also buy food, prom clothes, toilet paper, eyeglasses, and countless other items for children from families with meager means. This is on top of the hundreds, even thousands, of dollars that teachers spend each year on basic classroom supplies. In the Philadelphia area, teachers see themselves as first responders in the ongoing emergency of poverty.
NEWS
December 9, 2012 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey is partnering with a foundation to recruit and train as many as 100 new math and science teachers to spend three years in high-need schools across the state, including ones in Camden and Pemberton Borough. The initiative, announced Friday by Gov. Christie, will cost $9 million, all of it donated. Teaching recruits will have backgrounds in science, technology, engineering and math - the so-called STEM subjects - and will be trained in a model created by the Princeton-based Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation emphasizing teacher preparation and retention.
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | BY NICOLE GILLESPIE, PH.D
PERHAPS FOR VERY different reasons, students and parents across Philadelphia are already counting the days until school starts. Both might be wondering who will be standing in front of the classroom on the first day of school. Odds are good that the teacher in the room will be new to the school, new to Philadelphia and, quite possibly, completely new to teaching. Budget cuts and layoffs have eliminated positions for teachers and other staff. Other teachers are leaving because of retirements, poor working conditions and the transfer of district schools to charters.
NEWS
November 8, 2010 | By Luke Harold, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a Central High School science lab - with her teacher and 30 classmates huddled around - freshman Mjaan McIvor pointed a camping lighter toward a single marshmallow Peep. The jack-o'-lantern-shaped Peep was sitting on top of an inch-tall stand and inside a six-inch metal cylinder with a beaker of water placed above it. After some difficulty igniting the lighter, McIvor succeeded in setting the Peep on fire. It was a visual, personal, hands-on science experiment - the kind of interactive approach that teacher K.D. Davenport believes will leave her students with a deeper understanding of nutrition.
NEWS
July 23, 2009 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two kindergarten teachers from the Lumberton and Abington School Districts have won the nation's highest award for childhood math education. Kimberly Mueller of the F.L. Walther School in Lumberton and Anne Magaha of Rydal West Elementary School are among 87 recipients of the 2008 Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching, the National Science Foundation announced yesterday. Forty-one science teachers and 46 math teachers were chosen. The awards alternate yearly between teachers of kindergarten through sixth grade, and seventh grade through high school.
NEWS
June 12, 2008 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
When not spending time in or near the ocean this summer, hundreds of Chester County students in grades two through six will head to their local libraries to learn the science of the murky depths for free, through GlaxoSmithKline's Science in the Summer program. This will be the 22d summer that the British-based pharmaceutical giant will fund free science classes in the Philadelphia area, with 140 libraries - 17 in Chester County - hosting sessions. Bucks, Montgomery, Philadelphia, Delaware, and Chester Counties rotate topics each summer; this year it's Chester's turn to focus on oceanography while students in the other counties learn about bioscience, chemistry, genetics, and simple machines.
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