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NEWS
April 1, 2005 | By John Rennie
John Rennie is editor in chief of Scientific American Over the years, as the editor of a science magazine, I have received many letters that helpfully pointed out that my colleagues and I are opinionated goons who know nothing about science. They said our magazine needed more balance in its presentation of such issues as creationism, missile defense and global warming. We resisted that advice, and pretended not to be stung by the accusations that the magazine ought to be renamed Unscientific American, or Scientific Un-American, or even Unscientific Un-American.
LIVING
June 6, 1999 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From a galaxy far, far away - New Hampshire - Jeanne Cavelos journeys to tell us that the science in Star Wars may be out of this world, but it's nevertheless essentially sound. "What we see in Star Wars may very well be in the future for us but it's basically good," Cavelos, author of The Science of Star Wars (St. Martin's Press, $22.95), said in a recent interview. "I don't think George Lucas cared about the science when he wrote the movie [the original Star Wars]. However, the weird thing is that science has really worked to support him in the years since the movies came out. . . . Only in the last 10 years have we started finding actual planets around other stars, and scientists now think at least 10 percent of all stars have planets.
NEWS
October 16, 2012
By Mary Woolley A Nobel Prize is the most widely sought-after and treasured global recognition of our times, and rightly so. The achievements of the laureates, including this year's winners, have had a far-reaching impact on our lives, from discoveries related to stem-cell research to those involving quantum particles. Yet unlike Olympic medalists, the winners of the prizes for medicine and physiology, physics, and chemistry - respectively, John Gurdon of Britain and Japan's Shinya Yamanaka, Serge Haroche of France and American David Wineland, and Americans Robert Lefkowitz and Brian Kobilka - will not be celebrated by a broad segment of society.
LIVING
January 3, 2001 | By Eils Lotozo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There was that night in the Amazon when the flash unit on the camera he was holding got munched by a crocodile bigger than his boat. And that time off the coast of South Africa when he found himself swimming within arm's reach of a great white shark. But in the three years Peter Lane Taylor spent researching his new book, Science at the Extreme, the most terrifying moment of all came on a sojourn into the frozen heart of a glacier in Switzerland. The journalist and photographer had joined a team of Italian scientists making a 24-story descent by rope to the bottom of an ice shaft that led to a series of glacial caves.
NEWS
November 10, 1991 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
Pickles were electrified and invisible ink and optical illusions were created as the children oohed and aahed watching Steve Jacobs, of the Mr. Wizard Institute, perform eye-catching science experiments at Devon Elementary School last week. Jacobs, a consultant to the nationally known institute, based in Plymouth, Mich., emphasized the need for such basic science skills as observing, using numbers, measuring and experimenting. "Children experience an accelerated lifestyle and are used to instant feedback on everything," Jacobs said in an interview.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | By Michele McCreary, Special to The Inquirer
To Jeff Tucker, there is more to Wonder Bread and cream cheese that meets the eye. The 10-year-old spread a layer of cream cheese on top of two slices and wrapped them in plastic bags. He placed one in a damp, dark, musty corner; the other, in a sunny spot. That was earlier this year. Six weeks later, the Newtown Friends School fourth grader checked on his product. Both slices of bread were gross and unrecognizable, smothered with a rainbow of growth. He concluded that mold grows both in sunshine and in the dark.
NEWS
February 1, 1999 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Academy of Notre Dame de Namur will host a dedication and open-house celebration of a $3.4 million science and technology center at 2:30 p.m. Feb. 21. The 10,000-square-foot center features a television studio, science labs, and computer labs with Internet access. The private Catholic girls' school is at 580 Sproul Rd., Villanova. WOMEN IN SPORTS DAY The Baldwin School is planning to welcome Joel Fish, a sports psychologist and NCAA speaker, who will talk with students in eighth through 12th grade on Thursday.
NEWS
May 30, 2011 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a Psychology Today magazine blog appeared under the headline "Why Are African American Women Less Physically Attractive Than Other Women?", some dismissed it as an isolated incident of racism and misogyny creeping into science. But history shows that racism has poisoned certain areas of science intermittently for several hundred years. Here in Philadelphia in the early 1800s, one of the world's leading anthropologists, Samuel Morton, was measuring human skulls and using his results to justify the continued enslavement of Africans.
NEWS
December 30, 2009
The problem with Steven Newton's article concerning science being under attack is that it is not science itself that is under attack, but the presuppositions with which many scientists interpret their observations ("Science denial is on the rise," Thursday). Much of the establishment in science disallows any kind of dissent or other views to be aired because the scientists are hemmed in by a philosophical and ideological viewpoint that doesn't allow for any scientific evidence that doesn't conform to their preconceived ideas.
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | By Wendy Greenberg, Special to The Inquirer
After several months of hearing residents' bitter complaints on issues ranging from SAT scores to administrative salaries, the Springfield school board finally seems to have a hit with its mathematics, science and technology curriculum. About 100 parents and residents attended Tuesday night's regular board meeting to hear a progress report by the district's year-old Math/Science/ Technology Initiative Council. Without the council, said Sharon Richardson, assistant superintendent and council head, the curriculum in those areas would have been a "patchwork, rather than a unifying thread.
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