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NEWS
March 1, 1987 | Inquirer photographs by Ed Hille
How do video games affect people's cardiovascular systems? How many things can you do in one minute? How can sound be controlled? These were just a few of the questions that first through fifth graders at John Hancock Demonstration School explored last week in the school's first science fair. More than 600 projects were on display at the school, at Morrell and Crown Avenues. There were replicas of the human lung and ear, the solar system, erupting volcanoes and embryos. One student made an elevator demonstrating a pulley system; another created an electromagnetic crane.
NEWS
March 1, 2011 | By DAFNEY TALES, talesd@phillynews.com 215-854-5084
Philadelphia students lag behind in science achievement compared with students in other large cities, according to a recent study. The report, released last week by the National Assessment of Educational Progress, tracked the results of fourth- and eighth-grade public-school students in selected urban school districts. Most of the 17 participating districts scored below the national average. Of the total number of districts assessed, fourth-graders in Philadelphia scored 19 percent lower than the national average and eighth-graders scored 20 percent lower.
NEWS
January 28, 2013 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Taniyah, 12, is very articulate and readily expresses her thoughts and feelings. She enjoys singing, dancing, coloring, and drawing. Taniyah takes pride in her artistic ability and dancing skill. Enrolled in sixth-grade regular classroom, Taniyah likes going to school and is working hard to improve academically. Although her favorite subject is math, she is best at science and recently placed second in her school's science fair. In the future Taniyah would like to be a fashion designer or a makeup artist and travel to Paris.
NEWS
January 23, 2005 | By Bonnie L. Bassler, Jane Flint and Elizabeth R. Gavis
Last week, Lawrence Summers, president of Harvard University, shared his views on why so few women reach high-level positions in science and engineering. Summers cited three primary causes in order of importance: 1. Women with children are reluctant or unable to work 80 hours per week. 2. Women do not have the same innate ability as men in those fields. 3. There is a smaller pool of women than men from which to draw. This last point, Summers insists, is not the result of discrimination against women.
NEWS
August 8, 1991 | By Dave Urbanski, Special to The Inquirer
The countdown was about to begin. All conversation stopped. The crowd held its breath, all eyes focused on the launching pad only 10 yards away. Then, triumphant in their expectation of more than 30 separate rocket flights, the scientists shouted in unison. "5-4-3-2-1!" Nothing. "Whoops!" said a slightly embarrassed Howard Wolf, who had just readied the first rocket for liftoff. After a short but tense pause, Wolf placed his arm around his assistant for the day, Robert Healy, and announced to the stunned crowd why the rocket launch had fizzled.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Light Years, the imaginative collaboration of French animator Rene Laloux and science fiction's one-man conglomerate, Isaac Asimov, is a visual feast that also reminds fans of the famine that has overtaken the genre. The enormous cost of producing live-action science fiction has always limited the kind of fantasy that Hollywood was willing to try in the post-Star Wars years. And, if you peruse the production slates of the major studios, there's no escaping the fact that economics, and shifts in moviegoing taste, are having an inhibiting effect on the making of any science fiction.
NEWS
August 22, 1990 | By Gary H. Sternberg, Special to The Inquirer
With the aid of a $200,000 grant, Camden County College is embarking on a new program that will use group dynamics to help minority students succeed in such fields as science and mathematics. The program, "Partners With Students," will be using peer groups as well as specialized counseling and tutoring to assist black and Hispanic students at the two-year college's main campus in Blackwood and its Camden extension center, said Adrienne Coons, who will be supervising the program.
LIVING
April 16, 1993 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
Jodie is a friendly 14-year-old, with an easygoing manner that encourages others to get to know her. This 5 foot, 6 inch teenager has a happy laugh and a winning smile. Though she has been in several foster homes in the last eight years, and has suffered deprivation, abuse and neglect, she is still warm-hearted and affectionate. Her staff parent at the center where she lives with 72 other children, says she is kind, helpful, pleasant, shares well, and is sensitive to the sadness other people are feeling.
NEWS
October 11, 2007 | Reviewed by Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Air We Breathe By Andrea Barrett 297 pp. W.W. Norton. $25 Andrea Barrett is a lyrical novelist of the American past, giving life to pioneers in science with such resonance that even readers who wrestled mightily with chemistry come away entranced by her evocative accounts of discovery. The winner of a MacArthur fellowship and the National Book Award (for the 1996 short-story collection Ship Fever) and a Pulitzer finalist (for the 2003 Servants of the Map), Barrett is taken with an earlier time, when the country was much smaller and exploration - pushing boundaries in science, geography and knowledge - mattered far more than it does today.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Plays about science - especially physics - are a fascinating theatrical sub-species (Stoppard's Arcadia and Frayn's Copenhagen are among the finest). The problem is how to teach the audience all it needs to know while watching. QED, Peter Parnell's play about the great physicist and charismatic personality Richard Feynman, solves this problem with much charm, although finally the play is more about the man and his adventurous approach to life than it is about quantum electrodynamics (i.e.
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