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NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1796, when Thomas Jefferson was vice president of the United States, he received a shipment of "certain bones" found in a cave in Virginia. The bones and three claws, from an unknown creature, proved tremendously exciting to Jefferson, who at the time was also president of the American Philosophical Society, the nation's premier scientific association, founded in 1743 in Philadelphia by Benjamin Franklin. Examining the enormous claws, Jefferson became convinced they were concrete evidence that his young nation harbored lions more fierce than anything known to the Old World.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Paul McCartney keeps a piano bedside to try out musical ideas that come to him in the middle of the night. Screenwriter Aaron Sorkin ( The West Wing , Sports Night ) overcomes writer's block by taking six or more showers a day. And John Kounios, a pioneer in the study of insight, rides the quiet Regional Rail car on his commute to and from his West Chester home so he can carve out a creative, idea-inducing space for himself. The Drexel University professor of psychology further isolates himself by donning noise-canceling Bose headphones (to block the rumble of the train)
SPORTS
July 1, 2015 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
THERE ARE few things in life that pique the interest of 76ers coach Brett Brown as much as basketball. One of those, however, is his obsession with sports science. Yesterday, the team announced that it has hired Dr. David T. Martin as director of performance research and development. He joins the Sixers from his senior sports science position at the renowned Australian Institute of Sports. Brown has a long history of coaching in Australia, including serving as the head coach of the Australian Olympic team.
SPORTS
June 22, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most NBA draft classes have them: the cautionary tale, the European bust, the college all-American who couldn't cut it, the late first-rounders who outperformed their draft order. The 2011 draft has all that in multiples. Now that it can be judged a little more fairly, if not completely, the 2011 draft is a reminder that mock drafts sometimes need to be mocked and day-after report cards need to be graded later. Looking back at 2011, you can see how a team of the players selected between 11 and 20 might beat a team of those drafted one through 10. That's without one of the best players in that class who was selected 30th, the final pick of the first round.
NEWS
June 16, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Diagonally across from the Walter Rand Transportation Center in Camden, a small strip of storefronts and restaurants attracts a steady stream of people in and out to get fried chicken, look at new cellphones, buy clothing. The scene is set to be replaced with a different sort of bustle as state authorities last week granted preliminary approval to $50 million for a new health sciences building. Stretching from Broadway west to Fifth Street and from Martin Luther King Boulevard south to Stevens Street, the Joint Health Sciences Center and related buildings are meant to bring together Rowan University, Rutgers-Camden, and other medical and educational institutions in the city for teaching and research.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University City Science Center's monolithic office buildings will be joined to a new zone featuring pedestrian-friendly shopping streets, apartment towers, and a sprawling public plaza as part of the West Philadelphia business incubation and research complex's plan to more than double in size. Wexford Science and Technology, which is developing the new site, said Thursday that its goal in the $1 billion project is to break up the long, unbroken blocks of offices and institutional structures where the expansion will occur while mixing in other uses.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University City Science Center plans to more than double its size over 10 years as it seeks to lure higher-profile biomedical and technology firms to the West Philadelphia business incubation and research complex. The Science Center and its development partner on the expansion, Wexford Science & Technology, will pool their landholdings in the area to build more than four million square feet of offices, laboratories, homes, retail shops, and parking structures, the Science Center said Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Yuck! The 3D "Animal Grossology" exhibit, based on Sylvia Branzei's children's book series Grossology , showcases the stinkiest, smelliest experiences nature has to offer. Entertain your inquisitive nature at the exhibit's Cart of Curiosity with themes such as "Ew, That Comes From Where?" and see the icky origins of popular items such as honey, perfume, and even certain types coffee. At the "Patterns of the Poop" exhibit, you can take rubber recreations and match the end product to the animal from which it came.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
DISNEY JUST can't let it go. The publishing division and Imagicademy of the Mouse House, which has turned synergy into an art form that would make Pixar jealous, announced yesterday that it would create apps for a "Frozen: Early Science" series, featuring characters from the "Frozen" movie. "We are excited to introduce early learners to another educational concept in a fun and uniquely Disney way," said Disney Learning exec Jeff Sellinger in a statement. "The 'Frozen: Early Science' apps bring together Frozen's hugely popular story and characters with an early sciences curriculum developed in conjunction with education experts and academics.
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