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NEWS
September 27, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
With exotic science equipment in tow, University of Pennsylvania physics professor Larry Gladney gave Philadelphia high school students an eye-popping demonstration of the interactions among sound, light, and energy, but the key message was: "Don't give up. " "The only thing that succeeds is persistence," said Gladney, who conducted experiments before 120 students Wednesday at the High School for the Creative and Performing Arts as part of program...
NEWS
September 23, 2014 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Suproteem Sarkar has coauthored two scientific papers on cancer treatments, been a presenter at an international nanoscience conference, and won accolades as a pianist. But perhaps the most notable entry on his resumé is the birth date - Sarkar is 17, just entering his senior year at Conestoga High School in Berwyn, Chester County. "He's definitely a highflier here," said Conestoga principal Amy Meisinger. "He's on the fast track for something. " Family members say his precocity was evident almost from the beginning.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
The list is long of the perfect accompaniments to beer: hot dogs, pizza, peanuts, and pretzels, to name just a few. Most definitely not on that list: pediococcus and lactobacillus. Consider them beer buzzkills. These are types of bacteria that often hitch a ride into breweries aboard grain. If they make their way into the beer itself, they can spoil taste by producing lactic acid, a chemical compound most commonly associated with sore muscles after exertion and first refined in 1780 from sour milk.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Under the rapt stares of about 100 children and a statue of Benjamin Franklin, a staff member at the Franklin Institute poured liquid nitrogen into a bucket of water. A cloud mushroomed out over the sides and raced toward the youngsters. "Wow!" a chorus of surprised and delighted children squealed, reaching out to touch the indoor cloud. A few hundred more children scurried through the institute's famous heart and new brain exhibits Saturday, when the museum opened to more than 1,400 people free of charge.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Test the laws of physics and biology with the Franklin Institute's "Circus Science Under the Big Top" interactive exhibition through Sept. 1. Find out the tricks of the trade as to how entertainers perform their daring feats, including being shot from cannons and swallowing fire. Visitors can launch cannonballs and use physics to calculate their landing points, try to twist their bodies like contortionists, and try walking a tightrope or doing tricks on a trapeze. While at the museum, check out Brain Freeze from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., part of the institute's Kitchen Science program; watch goodies being cooked with dry ice.   "Circus Science Under the Big Top," through Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
On Saturday, get ready for the invasion. Bring your swim attire and old shoes, play games, and get chased by pirates during Colonial Pennsylvania Plantation's Pirate Splash Day. Beginning at noon, do all things pirate. Foot races include running through a maze grabbing coins while avoiding getting sprayed by water-wielding pirates. Learn how to bob for apples with your feet. Display your might playing tug-o'-war and engage in water-pistol fighting, rubber ducky races, and other aquatic fun. Craft activities include candle making, coloring, and papermaking.
NEWS
July 1, 2014 | By Emilie Lounsberry, For The Inquirer
EAST STROUDSBURG, Pa. - The fire lit up the predawn sky on July 29, 1989, sizzling electrical wires and leaving behind the charred remains of a small cabin at a Korean Christian retreat. Inside was the body of 20-year-old Ji Yun Lee, a mentally ill woman from New York who had been brought here by her father in a desperate bid for help. As the embers cooled, investigators found what they considered evidence of arson and began looking with suspicion at her father, Han Tak Lee, who spoke little English and seemed unfazed by his daughter's death.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Just as the Franklin Institute eases into its new 53,000-square-foot, $41 million Nicholas and Athena Karabots Pavilion, which opens Saturday, the science center figures it needs to get out of the building more often. And it is. The 190-year-old institute is opening science high schools in Egypt and Philadelphia, training teachers in science curriculum, and developing programs that turn on young scholars to careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Some of these programs are well-established.
SPORTS
June 6, 2014 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Columnist
THE GENERAL feeling, after watching a couple of days of the Eagles' offense at the OTAs, is that the tempo might be even faster than it was last season. Watching them practice, it seems to run the fastest with Nick Foles at quarterback, and then with Matt Barkley, and then with Mark Sanchez - which only makes sense. But Foles can get them from whistle to snap in 15 seconds sometimes, and for a few consecutive plays at a time, 15, 15, 15. It is absurd. Some of it is a mindset. Some of it is superior conditioning, even at this point in the year.
NEWS
May 5, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jaime Lee admitted to doing a little dance to the ethnic beat pulsating from the Sister Cities Park International Festival as she walked by on Saturday. And the food stands operated by some of the city's finest restaurants at the Rittenhouse Row Spring Festival on Walnut Street did seem mighty tempting. But it was a Temple University physics exhibit at the Philadelphia Science Festival's carnival that had the Burlington Township biology teacher and her 5-year-old daughter, Katie, at dough.
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