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ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2016
Tarantulas: Alive and Up Close The long: In a dimly lit gallery next to the Academy of Natural Sciences' butterfly room, 20 hairy, crawly, colorful eight-legged species of the world's largest spiders quietly lurk behind thick panes of glass, spinning webs, digging holes and eating crickets. The short: Sounds creepy but it looks lovely. The demo: Grade school on up. Big kids: Will love seeking and finding crawlers hiding behind logs and buried beneath dirt.
NEWS
February 1, 2016
THE CURATOR of the Department of Entomology at the Academy of Natural Sciences doesn't want you to be bugged out by the Academy's newest exhibit - Tarantulas: Alive and Up Close - which opens this weekend. Sure, tarantulas are the biggest and hairiest of all spiders. And sure, only a pane of glass will separate visitors from 20 different species of the creature - including the largest-known variety, the goliath bird-eating tarantula - but Jon Gelhaus said visitors have nothing to fear and may even get over their fears by confronting them at the exhibit.
NEWS
January 18, 2016
Maker Susan Casey Gleason, 27, of Fishtown - the one-woman operation that is Desarc by Susan Casey, a maker of jewelry and lighting celebrating bold, graphic forms. Her start Gleason studied in the jewelry program at Temple's Tyler School of Art but was assigned to make a light for a class project. She discovered the affinity between the two forms: "Lighting and jewelry seem really disparate, but to me there are pendants in jewelry and also in lighting. There are brooches that pin onto your shirt, much like a sconce pins onto a wall.
NEWS
December 25, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Concussion tells the story of how a Pittsburgh pathologist's research led to the discovery of chronic traumatic encephalopathy - CTE, the degenerative disease linked to repetitive brain trauma. CTE can cause chronic headaches, dizziness and fatigue. Changes in behavior mimic dementia. The disorder also raises the risk for depression and abuse of alcohol and drugs. Several NFL players depicted in the movie committed suicide. Movies often oversimplify complex medical issues.
NEWS
December 20, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
New Jersey lawmakers gave final approval Friday to $50 million in bonds to help fund a "health sciences" center in downtown Camden. The building is being developed by a joint Rowan University and Rutgers-Camden board of governors, formed in 2013 and tasked with creating health sciences partnerships between the schools. The center is to go up in the block diagonally across from the Walter Rand Transportation Center. The block stretches from Martin Luther King Boulevard to Stevens Street and from Broadway to Fifth Street.
NEWS
December 15, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leveling a city block in downtown Camden to build a "health sciences" campus, the Rowan University/Rutgers-Camden Board of Governors has begun flexing its muscle, making clear the scope of its mission and powers. Less than two years since its creation, the board also has funded diabetes research and steered federal grant money to training and jobs program. The most tangible evidence is the demolition work on the block diagonally across from the Walter Rand Transportation Center - a block that the joint board has nearly finished acquiring, in part using eminent domain.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drexel University opened a shared office suite for burgeoning life-science and medical-device companies Wednesday in what the school is portraying as a preview of its larger development plans for the area. Three firms have signed on as subtenants of the newly renovated space in the One Drexel Plaza building at 3001 Market St., on the east side of the 12-acre expanse of Drexel-owned property where the university plans its "Innovation Neighborhood. " Drexel is in the process of choosing a developer for the project, which will include offices, labs, shops, and residences on land mostly bounded by 30th, Market, and 32d Streets and the rail yards north of the campus.
NEWS
November 24, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert A.G. Montgomery Jr., 78, a pioneering Philadelphia educator, died Wednesday, Nov. 11, of complications of Alzheimer's disease at Brookdale Northampton, an assisted-living facility in Richboro. Mr. Montgomery was a chemistry and physics teacher for two decades at Northeast High School, where he began Project SPARC, an after-school program that educated students in aeronautics and related fields. It inspired scores of young Philadelphians to follow careers in science, math, and engineering.
NEWS
November 19, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Surely there are not many people who can say that they have contributed to the fight against cancer and to the art of fingerprint forensics. Throw in expertise with a fungus used to make Roquefort cheese, and almost certainly the number goes down to one: University of Pennsylvania chemistry professor Madeleine M. JoulliƩ. She is among the two winners of this year's John Scott award, a science prize given by the City of Philadelphia since 1822. The other winner is Temple University physics professor John P. Perdew, who developed a widely used computational method for predicting the properties of new materials.
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