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SPORTS
May 3, 2013 | The Inquirer Staff
The University of the Sciences defeated Philadelphia University, 4-3, after falling to Georgian Court, 5-0, Thursday in the Central Atlantic Collegiate Conference softball tournament at Georgian Court in Lakewood, N.J. In the Philadelphia U. game, Haley Kavelak's walk-off single capped the Devils' comeback from a 3-0 deficit. Courtney Spina (Garnet Valley) became the Devils' all-time leader for strikeouts with 334. Jackie Keifer (Archbishop Prendergast) hit her first collegiate home run in the second inning, a two-run shot.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Children's nonfiction author Vicki Cobb brings her one-woman science show to the Free Library on the Parkway Sunday as part of the Philadelphia Science Festival. Children will discover science through Cobb's interactive show, including illusions and challenges based on her books. Cobb, author of 85 books including the best-selling series Bet You Can! and Bet You Can't! , has appeared on Late Night With David Letterman and Live With Regis and Kathie Lee . The program is part of the Parkway Central Library's Margaret S. Halloran Family Literacy Programming Series.
NEWS
April 26, 2013
WHY DO bars serve nuts? I'd always assumed it was to make you thirsty so you'd drink more beer. But that's only half right, as the taste and smell experts from University City's Monell Chemical Senses Center proved to me on a recent afternoon of sudsy experimentation. The center's researchers were gearing up for the Philadelphia Science Festival, the citywide nerd expo that runs through Sunday. Beer drinkers in particular will want to dip into Monell's fun presentation tomorrow at Yards Brewery, where they'll explain the chemistry behind beer-and-food pairings.
NEWS
April 25, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jerrold Meinwald is one of the founding fathers of a field called chemical ecology, often speaking in large lecture halls about how insects and other animals repel predators with toxins. On Tuesday at the Franklin Institute, he had to defend his life's work in a less-formal setting - face-to-face with inquisitive high-schoolers. How are the toxins made? students asked. How concentrated are they? Which creatures emit the most toxic poisons? "You have to ask, 'Poisonous to whom?
NEWS
April 22, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Families pushing a brigade of strollers, teens clutching skateboards, and other science lovers of all ages descended on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway on Saturday for a daylong celebration of hands-on learning, experiments, and fun. The Science Carnival on the Parkway, which drew thousands, was the centerpiece of the third annual Philadelphia Science Festival, a 10-day event that aims to spark interest in science and technology across the region....
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
They've got chocolate. The latest news on hallucinogenic drugs. Espionage, jazz, and weathered gravestones. Plus video games for autistic kids. Where else but the third annual Philadelphia Science Festival? The 11-day extravaganza starts Thursday, with 110 events aimed at all ages, many in locations not normally associated with science. At restaurants, branch libraries, and even cemeteries, people can examine dinosaur fossils, gaze at the stars, build rockets, and learn about the science of beer, cheese, or honey.
NEWS
April 12, 2013 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
GIZMO GUY took a Sound Walk around Rittenhouse Square the other day with an iPhone, listening to a just-launched, crowd-sourced app called "The Empty Air" that puts the park in a new creative light. Spawned by the music group The Mural and The Mint, fronted by soundscapist Michael Kiley, "The Empty Air" is a kinetic aural installation that uses iPhone GPS to trigger sounds at certain locations within the park. The effect can be pretty cute, but occasionally, the reaction is "What the heck were they thinking?"
NEWS
April 11, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
James J. Markham, 84, of Glenside, a chemistry professor and former associate dean of sciences at Villanova University, died Thursday, April 4, of a heart ailment at home. Dr. Markham's long association with Villanova began when he enrolled there in 1946 to study chemistry. He graduated in 1950, and returned to the campus as a lecturer on Sept. 1, 1952. He was named an assistant professor of chemistry in the College of Arts and Sciences in 1957; he rose to become associate professor four years later.
NEWS
April 10, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
When she arrived at the University of the Sciences, Helen F. Giles-Gee was impressed with the beautiful oil paintings in the president's office, which she was about to occupy. But something struck her: "There was no painting of a woman. So I asked: Is there someone distinctive that I could put on the wall that would be representative of the women at this institution?" Up went a portrait of Susan Hayhurst, the first female graduate of what was then known as the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2013 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
For 50 years, the University City Science Center has been where scientists and start-ups have toiled to build the next generation of Philadelphia-area companies. But to hear science center president and CEO Stephen S. Tang , what would really help nurture that entrepreneurial soup would be if a big life-sciences company were to put its headquarters or research operations in West Philadelphia. Given that several of the biggest drug companies locally have already made long-term commitments elsewhere, there is nothing on the horizon presently.
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