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BUSINESS
December 4, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drexel University opened a shared office suite for burgeoning life-science and medical-device companies Wednesday in what the school is portraying as a preview of its larger development plans for the area. Three firms have signed on as subtenants of the newly renovated space in the One Drexel Plaza building at 3001 Market St., on the east side of the 12-acre expanse of Drexel-owned property where the university plans its "Innovation Neighborhood. " Drexel is in the process of choosing a developer for the project, which will include offices, labs, shops, and residences on land mostly bounded by 30th, Market, and 32d Streets and the rail yards north of the campus.
NEWS
November 24, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert A.G. Montgomery Jr., 78, a pioneering Philadelphia educator, died Wednesday, Nov. 11, of complications of Alzheimer's disease at Brookdale Northampton, an assisted-living facility in Richboro. Mr. Montgomery was a chemistry and physics teacher for two decades at Northeast High School, where he began Project SPARC, an after-school program that educated students in aeronautics and related fields. It inspired scores of young Philadelphians to follow careers in science, math, and engineering.
NEWS
November 19, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Surely there are not many people who can say that they have contributed to the fight against cancer and to the art of fingerprint forensics. Throw in expertise with a fungus used to make Roquefort cheese, and almost certainly the number goes down to one: University of Pennsylvania chemistry professor Madeleine M. JoulliƩ. She is among the two winners of this year's John Scott award, a science prize given by the City of Philadelphia since 1822. The other winner is Temple University physics professor John P. Perdew, who developed a widely used computational method for predicting the properties of new materials.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
A 10-year-old with sparkling eyes and a brilliant smile, Neilek has a great sense of humor and boundless energy, which he channels into sports. His favorites are football and soccer, followed by swimming. For a breather, he plays video games and watches cartoons on TV. The best days of the year, he says, are his birthday and Christmas, because he feels special and receives gifts. Neilek aspires to be a scientist or a professional football player. Inquisitive and interested in learning, he is an A/B student and proud of it. Math and science are his favorite subjects.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's Chemical Heritage Foundation and the Life Sciences Foundation, of San Francisco, both founded by retired University of Pennsylvania professor Arnold Thackray, said they plan to merge next month. The headquarters of the combined entity will be at the Chemical Heritage Foundation's museum and library on Chestnut Street in Old City, but the organization will retain offices on the West Coast. The Chemical Heritage Foundation, founded in 1982, had $5.4 million in revenue in the year ended June 30, 2014.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2015 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reptiles are cool (and not just because they're cold-blooded). Find out why and get up close and personal with the scaly set during the opening of the exhibit Reptiles: The Beautiful and the Deadly at the Academy of Natural Sciences, featuring 20 species of live examples, including a monitor lizard, bearded dragon, Gila monster, crocodile, alligator, chameleon, gecko, python, viper, cobra, and more. Opening events include hands-on activities, crafts, and live-animal shows with naturalists giving talks such as "Dandy Dinos and Bodacious Birds," about the most popular reptiles of all time - the long-gone dinosaurs - and their fine-feathered relatives still with us (11 a.m.)
NEWS
October 2, 2015 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
LOS ANGELES - The film "The Martian" has been praised for its scientific accuracy. Of course, when the author of the novel on which the film is based is the son of a particle physicist father and an electrical engineer mother, the odds of that greatly increase. "My dad did encourage me," said Andy Weir, who wrote The Martian . "He is a proper nerd [and] I'm like him. For Mom, electrical engineering was a job, not a passion - but she encouraged me to read a lot. So I guess a combination of that made me a sci-fi writer.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University City Science Center campus is getting a new name - uCity Square - that its leaders hope captures better the inclusive urban vibe they are seeking to cultivate at the West Philadelphia site. Though the science center itself will continue as a business incubator and research hub under its current name, the campus on which it operates is being rebranded as part of its $1 billion expansion in partnership with developer Wexford Science & Technology, officials announced Tuesday.
NEWS
September 13, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of the Sciences and Salus University have begun talks about "forming a broad strategic partnership" that could result in a merger, the president of Salus wrote in an email to colleagues Thursday. "Although discussions are very much in an exploratory phase, our respective boards recognize the potential for growth as a combined institution far exceeds what either of us can accomplish alone," wrote Michael H. Mittelman, president of Salus, the Elkins Park institution formerly called the Pennsylvania College of Optometry.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Lauren McCutcheon, Daily News Staff Writer
David George Gordon, author of The Eat-a-Bug Cookbook, offers tips on how to (and how not to) cook with insects. He'll be on hand to answer questions at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University's Bug Fest , Aug. 8 and 9, 11 a.m. to noon and 3 to 5 p.m. His insect cooking show starts at 1 p.m. 1. Buy, don't scavenge. The backyard and basement are not the best places to source insect-ingredients. "The big problem is pesticides. If the bugs have been eating pesticides, you can become a bioaccumulator and wind up storing all that pesticide in your body.
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