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SPORTS
October 20, 2013 | The Inquirer Staff
University of the Sciences junior Kaileen Bevenour (Washington Township) notched her 2,000th career assist in a 3-1 volleyball victory Friday over Holy Family in Central Atlantic Collegiate Conference action. She becomes just the third player in program history to record 2,000 or more assists. The Devils are 9-15, 5-6, and the Tigers are 10-11, 6-5. Sophomores Meg O'Day and Keri Godbe combined for 26 kills as Haverford College swept past visiting Johns Hopkins University, 3-0, in Centennial Conference action.
NEWS
October 13, 2013
SOCCER PUBLIC LEAGUE Science Leadership 2, Masterman 0: Alyssa Winner scored on offense in the first half and then shut out visiting Masterman as a goalie in the second. SUBURBAN ONE AMERICAN Wissahickon 4, Upper Merion 1: Stacie Rocco notched a hat trick and Ashley Laskowitz chipped in a goal and an assist in a home win for Wissahickon. Plymouth Whitemarsh 4, Norristown 1: Rachel Konowal scored twice and Aurora Mills and Allison Spinelli had a goal and an assist each in Norristown.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Tom Avril and Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writers
When you take a picture of something that measures just a few atoms across, you need an awfully steady place to mount your camera. This explains why, on the corner of 32d and Walnut Streets, construction crews hammered and dug their way 18 feet into the ground. They sank stout caissons into the underlying Wissahickon schist. And then, in a "sweet spot" designated for a series of high-tech basement labs, they poured a slab of concrete three feet thick. The result, despite the nearby urban rumble of trucks, buses, and trains, is an unyielding platform for "cameras" - really, electron microscopes - to study particles that are billionths of a meter in diameter.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2013 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
In terms of foreign aid, it felt like a bit of role reversal Friday at the University City Science Center. An audience of science center reps, scientists, researchers, and entrepreneurs heard about funding opportunities, not from their own country with an eye to expanding globally, but money coming from the European Union. That's right: The 28 countries that make up the European Union have put up 70 billion euros, or more than $90 billion, to promote science and research aimed largely at bolstering Europe's position in the world but also with an eye to tackling issues of global significance as well, such as climate change.
NEWS
September 20, 2013 | By Megan Lydon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alfonso R. Gennaro, 87, who spent more than 50 years at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia died of renal cell cancer Sunday, Sept. 8, at his home in Ambler. Mr. Gennaro was at the university so long he witnessed its name change. He was an undergraduate back when it was known as the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science, and was a professor when it got its new identity in 1997. Before his college career began, the Philadelphia native served in the Navy from 1944 to 1946 and saw action in the Pacific Theatre during World War II. The electronic technician's mate was aboard the USS Blue Ridge when the vessel took part in the liberation of the Philippines.
NEWS
September 18, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a Philadelphia woman was sentenced to be hanged after poisoning her husband and two children in 1888, an early pioneer in the field of mental health came to her defense. Psychiatrist Alice Bennett argued that the murderer's "weak brain" had been further impaired by "periodical congestions at the menstrual periods. " Intrigued? Soak up all you can in 10 minutes, because then it's onto another topic. The use of X-rays to uncover forgeries of Old Masters paintings. A deadly disease that was intertwined with commerce and war. A botanist who built a majestic greenhouse in post-Revolutionary War Philadelphia without benefit of running water or electricity.
NEWS
August 28, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Gregory Wilkinson spent part of his summer vacation beating caterpillars in Arizona. It was all for a good, green cause: To "beat" the creatures is to collect, and it is hoped, protect them. "Some of the plants the caterpillars eat are disappearing, and the caterpillars are going to disappear too," says Wilkinson, 33, who teaches seventh-grade math at William Allen Middle School in Moorestown. "They can't just decide to change what they're eating. That sort of adaptation takes thousands and thousands of years.
NEWS
August 13, 2013
R OBERT JONES III, 28, of East Falls, is a personal trainer and group-exercise instructor whose business goes by the name Riley F.A.S.T. Jones played hoops at Lower Merion High School and Immaculata College, and teaches health and wellness classes at Immaculata. He has appeared on Comcast On Demand workouts and marketed his own workout DVD, "Break Your Limits. " In July, he worked at Kobe Bryant's summer basketball camp. Q: How'd you get into the biz? A: I grew up in West Philly, went to Girard College and transferred to Lower Merion in the ninth grade.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
E xperience the sloppy side of science this weekend at the Franklin Institute's Mess Fest. From noon to 3 p.m. both days, experiments of cosmic, slimy, and explosive proportions will be executed by the institute's educators. The Epic Soap Bubble Monster will kick things off by detonating mounds of soapsuds into the air. During the Giant Ball Explosion, observers can watch 2,000 balls interact with ultra-cold liquid nitrogen and steaming hot water, and guess how high they will fly. Watch gravity demonstrations you shouldn't try at home, with such things as spaghetti, Jell-O, and a watermelon being dropped from 42 feet.
NEWS
July 23, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's a good thing red bread mold grows so quickly. Camden County College student Paul Manofu has only a few weeks to study the effects of tobacco on the fast-growing Neurospora crassa , considered a "model organism" for research because of its 24-hour growth spurts. He's hoping the experiment offers clues in the study of the "internal clock" that helps regulate cycles such as sleeping patterns, eating times, and energy levels. It's all part of a larger project led by Rutgers-Camden biology professor Kwangwon Lee. "If the circadian rhythm is altered in the model organism, it's likely to be modeled in humans as well," Manofu said, as he examined six glass tubes bound together with the fungus growing inside, fuzzy bursts of peach-colored mold every few inches.
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