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NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Jerry Iannelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
GLASSBORO The fish were fighting themselves. On Friday, 23 Clearview Regional High School students sat distracted in Rowan University assistant professor Matthew Bealor's laboratory in Glassboro as participants in the university's eighth annual Science Day. They were prodding tanks of betta fish on the countertops, some rapping their nets against the glass, others pressing their noses to the sides of the tanks. After lecturing for a few minutes about the aggressive tendencies of male betta fish - which will rip one another to shreds if more than one is kept in the same tank - the professor told the visiting students they were allowed to lower their floating mirrors into the water.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
  PHILADELPHIA The students filed into South Philadelphia's Academy at Palumbo auditorium by the dozen Tuesday afternoon, thinking they were in trouble. Minutes later, the room went dark and balloons started streaming down from the second-floor balcony. As a video began playing on a screen in front of them, the auditorium erupted into a sea of cheers. Palumbo students learned Tuesday that they had been chosen as one of five winners of Samsung's nationwide Solve for Tomorrow contest, a competition designed to raise awareness for science, technology, engineering, and math education among public school students.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHOENIXVILLE The pilot was explaining how the big Sikorsky S-76 helicopter sitting outside Phoenixville Middle School worked when someone asked why pilots wear flight suits. The chief reason is they are fire retardant, but all those pockets are good for stashing essentials, like lip gloss and nail files, pilot Stacy Sheard said. Most of her colleagues might not have given that answer, as the overwhelming majority of helicopter pilots are men. But at the Chester County Economic Development Council's 14th annual GETT (Girls Exploring Tomorrow's Technology)
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A plan by the University of Pennsylvania to cut back on two of its branch libraries - one for engineering and the other for math, physics, and astronomy - has yielded an outcry from students and professors who say the books are critical to their studies and research. Both libraries are housed within the same campus buildings as their departments, and are heavily used by undergraduates and graduate students alike. Mathematics students, in particular, said many of the books and materials they need are not available electronically, and they must browse the library to find what they need.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
HOW MUCH fun is in store at the Philadelphia Science Festival? Lots , suggests the just-announced kick-off event - a Drexel University-steered project to create the ultimate, Guinness World Record Rube Goldberg Machine. Uh, what's that? Think mind-boggling thingamajig made with chutes and ladders, pipes and pulleys, fog-blowing this and generator-powered that, to be spread all over the floor of the 33rd Street Armory, in University City. Happening April 25 through May 3, this fourth science fest is all about "inspiring the next generation of scientists and engineers," shared Franklin Institute president and CEO Dennis Wint at yesterday's event.
FOOD
March 7, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
"I can teach all of freshman chemistry in 45 minutes without leaving anything out - it's one of my great achievements," says Clark Smith. Anyone who knows Smith knows he isn't bragging - not exactly. A noted winemaker, scientist, inventor, consultant, college professor, and author of the recent book Postmodern Winemaking (University of California Press), Smith, 62, is one of the most dynamic, erudite, and outspoken people I've ever met in the wine industry, not to mention a know-it-all.
SPORTS
February 21, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
As much as any basketball coach in Philadelphia, David Pauley at the University of the Sciences tries to connect with the history of his game. Before his team's last home game Tuesday night, Pauley gave his seniors personal copies of a book of John Wooden quotes and anecdotes. "Ten bucks on Amazon," Pauley quipped beforehand, but he also said the little ceremony would be a private one in the locker room. That reminded Pauley that when Bill Russell's number was retired, his Boston Celtics teammates had gathered at an empty Boston Garden and watched the number being raised to the rafters.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Ground was broken Wednesday at the site of Philadelphia's latest high-rise rental effort - a 28-story, $110 million project at 36th and Market Streets in University City. Called 3601 Market Street and due for delivery in spring 2015, the building will be constructed on a portion of the 17-acre University City Science Center campus that is now a parking lot. The 364-unit, 443,000-square-foot, mixed-use structure is a joint project of the Science Center and Southern Land Co., of Nashville.
SPORTS
January 18, 2014 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Electrical and Technology's James Suber was well prepared for Thursday evening's Public League Division A matchup against Math, Civics and Sciences. In particular, the 6-foot-6, 200-pound senior forward was ready to square off with former Bartram teammate Mike Watkins, a 6-9, 220-pound junior and Penn State commit. "He's my brother, a close friend," Suber said. "Having played with him at Bartram, I kind of knew his game. I wanted to keep him off the block, make him use his left hand.
NEWS
December 16, 2013
Maybe science belongs on Pennsylvania's endangered species list. Some political leaders are already acting as if science is irrelevant. Gov. Corbett has named a former prosecutor who admits to a lack of scientific curiosity to be his environmental secretary. Pennsylvania was late to join efforts to reduce the pollution blowing into Northeastern states from the west. And the legislature is ignoring science in trying to remove animals from the endangered list. Corbett's new environmental secretary, E. Christopher Abruzzo, turned heads during recent confirmation hearings when he downplayed climate change and the role government should play in mitigating its effects.
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