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Scientific American

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NEWS
October 20, 1995 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Edward H. Riddle has proven once again that those who give of themselves get back in abundance. For 42 years, this retired scientist has been recording magazine articles for the blind. His Walter Cronkite-like voice has been heard - and gratefully so - by thousands of visually impaired listeners around the world. What Riddle, 79, of Jenkintown, has received in return has been devoted friendships with many members of his audience, a strong purpose for his life, and now, a high honor.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1986 | By Terry Bivens, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jonathan Piel, company president, was quick to acknowledge his predicament. "We're a small company in a business where takeover is the game, and we've been hurt economically," he said. "We could have continued to operate under the continuous threat of a hostile takeover. But rather than do that, we chose to put ourselves up for sale in hopes of finding a company that's compatible. " Piel's tactic is a familiar one in today's acquisition wars, but his battlefield is not. Piel does not run an oil company or an airline.
NEWS
April 6, 2005 | By Paul Krugman
It's a fact, documented by two recent studies, that registered Republicans and self-proclaimed conservatives make up only a small minority of professors at elite universities. Conservatives see it as compelling evidence of liberal bias in university hiring and promotion. And they say that new "academic freedom" laws will simply mitigate the effects of that bias, promoting a diversity of views. But a closer look both at the universities and at the motives of those who would police them suggests a quite different story.
NEWS
February 14, 1993 | By Inga Sandvoss, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James "Pops" Johnson has been recognized by the Coatesville City Council for distinguished service to the youth of Coatesville. Mary Frances Johnson, president of City Council, made the announcement last month in an official proclamation. For the last 30 years, Johnson has taught boys the art of boxing in the basement of Coatesville's YWCA. In November Johnson was one of three coaches in the tri-state area named USA Middle Atlantic Outstanding Boxing Coach for 1992. Lewis Green, one of Johnson's pupils, won the Middle Atlantic light- heavyweight championship last spring.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Fran DiBacco has more than a century's worth of reading to catch up on. "I've got 100,000 magazines," says DiBacco, who runs a West Deptford financial consulting firm when not curating his impressive collection of hard copy - and hard-to-find copies. "The oldest is the Literary Digest, from 1894," says the Southwest Philly native, who now lives in Mansfield Township, Burlington County. "The artwork and the pictures and the color in these magazines is just amazing. " DiBacco bought his first batch of vintage periodicals in 1984.
NEWS
April 20, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert Hesse Jr., 91, of Gwynedd Valley, a Philadelphia printing-company executive and community volunteer, died Tuesday, April 15, of respiratory failure at a retirement community in Medford. After a career in the graphic arts, Mr. Hesse retired in 1986 from the Winchell Printing Co. as executive vice president in charge of sales. At the time, Winchell was one of the largest printing firms in Philadelphia, with 300 employees. It was sold and later closed in 1994. Mr. Hesse, whose last name rhymes with Bessie, was born in Abington.
NEWS
March 27, 1986 | By Christina Long
In one of my high school social-studies classes, we were asked to pretend that we were on a desert island with resources enough for only half the group to survive. How would we allocate those resources? How would we decide who was to live and who was to die? The exercise, which seemed silly to me at the time, came rushing back in my memory as I was reviewing newspaper and magazine clips over the last year touting the latest bill of goods being sold to the American public - that the old are doing better at everyone else's expense, most notably children and future generations.
NEWS
August 24, 2003
Americans depend on federal scientists for solid information about food safety, air pollution, the spread of disease. Research done by the national scientific institutes and academies has cured diseases, prevented accidents, and made life-changing discoveries. But the Bush administration is risking public trust in vital government agencies by putting scientific findings through a political and ideological shredder. U.S. Rep. Henry Waxman (D., Calif.) this month released a report giving troubling examples of how political interference with science has led to "misleading statements by the President, inaccurate responses to Congress, altered Web sites, suppressed agency reports, erroneous international communications, and the gagging of scientists.
NEWS
April 3, 1997 | By John Murawski, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A future Nobel Prize winner may be lurking somewhere at the Fort Washington Expo Center today, one of the 844 budding inventors and theorists competing in the Delaware Valley Science Fair. Students in sixth through 12th grades from Southeastern Pennsylvania, South Jersey and Delaware are vying for 15 first-prize awards to be announced this afternoon, including three five-year scholarships to Drexel University. Their concoctions and designs, on public display all day today, span a range of scientific inquiry: extraction of DNA from onion cells, and magnetic levitation experiments, to name a few. And some are decidedly not for the average lay person, such as "An Analysis of the Effect of NaCl, CaClw, MgCl2 on Rapid-Cycling Brassica rapa.
NEWS
September 24, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF YOU COULD not develop a passion for microbiology, you would have been advised to stay away from Norm Willett. "Norm is the consummate microbiologist," a colleague once said. "He loves microbiology. " Not only did he love it, he wanted other people to love it, too. "His enthusiasm for communicating it to everyone, no matter what their status - student, colleague or administrator - is evident in even short conversations," Toby K. Eisenstein, professor of microbiology and immunology at the Temple University School of Medicine, said in a tribute to Norm.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 24, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF YOU COULD not develop a passion for microbiology, you would have been advised to stay away from Norm Willett. "Norm is the consummate microbiologist," a colleague once said. "He loves microbiology. " Not only did he love it, he wanted other people to love it, too. "His enthusiasm for communicating it to everyone, no matter what their status - student, colleague or administrator - is evident in even short conversations," Toby K. Eisenstein, professor of microbiology and immunology at the Temple University School of Medicine, said in a tribute to Norm.
NEWS
April 20, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert Hesse Jr., 91, of Gwynedd Valley, a Philadelphia printing-company executive and community volunteer, died Tuesday, April 15, of respiratory failure at a retirement community in Medford. After a career in the graphic arts, Mr. Hesse retired in 1986 from the Winchell Printing Co. as executive vice president in charge of sales. At the time, Winchell was one of the largest printing firms in Philadelphia, with 300 employees. It was sold and later closed in 1994. Mr. Hesse, whose last name rhymes with Bessie, was born in Abington.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Fran DiBacco has more than a century's worth of reading to catch up on. "I've got 100,000 magazines," says DiBacco, who runs a West Deptford financial consulting firm when not curating his impressive collection of hard copy - and hard-to-find copies. "The oldest is the Literary Digest, from 1894," says the Southwest Philly native, who now lives in Mansfield Township, Burlington County. "The artwork and the pictures and the color in these magazines is just amazing. " DiBacco bought his first batch of vintage periodicals in 1984.
NEWS
April 6, 2005 | By Paul Krugman
It's a fact, documented by two recent studies, that registered Republicans and self-proclaimed conservatives make up only a small minority of professors at elite universities. Conservatives see it as compelling evidence of liberal bias in university hiring and promotion. And they say that new "academic freedom" laws will simply mitigate the effects of that bias, promoting a diversity of views. But a closer look both at the universities and at the motives of those who would police them suggests a quite different story.
NEWS
August 24, 2003
Americans depend on federal scientists for solid information about food safety, air pollution, the spread of disease. Research done by the national scientific institutes and academies has cured diseases, prevented accidents, and made life-changing discoveries. But the Bush administration is risking public trust in vital government agencies by putting scientific findings through a political and ideological shredder. U.S. Rep. Henry Waxman (D., Calif.) this month released a report giving troubling examples of how political interference with science has led to "misleading statements by the President, inaccurate responses to Congress, altered Web sites, suppressed agency reports, erroneous international communications, and the gagging of scientists.
NEWS
April 3, 1997 | By John Murawski, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A future Nobel Prize winner may be lurking somewhere at the Fort Washington Expo Center today, one of the 844 budding inventors and theorists competing in the Delaware Valley Science Fair. Students in sixth through 12th grades from Southeastern Pennsylvania, South Jersey and Delaware are vying for 15 first-prize awards to be announced this afternoon, including three five-year scholarships to Drexel University. Their concoctions and designs, on public display all day today, span a range of scientific inquiry: extraction of DNA from onion cells, and magnetic levitation experiments, to name a few. And some are decidedly not for the average lay person, such as "An Analysis of the Effect of NaCl, CaClw, MgCl2 on Rapid-Cycling Brassica rapa.
NEWS
January 3, 1996 | By Rachel Simon
It was a remarkable case history. The focus of endless conferences and learned papers. Like the famous patients Anna O. and Sybil, this tale fascinated the public for years. Billy and Newt. Or, as they are known in the annals of the American Medical Association: the Brothers Who Would Ruin Everything. Two fatherless adolescents out to annihilate each other, not caring one whit if they brought the whole house down with them. Both boys suffered from hero complexes, though each handled his a different way. Newt, the fatter and more ornery one, was a classic example of oppositional defiant disorder.
NEWS
October 20, 1995 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Edward H. Riddle has proven once again that those who give of themselves get back in abundance. For 42 years, this retired scientist has been recording magazine articles for the blind. His Walter Cronkite-like voice has been heard - and gratefully so - by thousands of visually impaired listeners around the world. What Riddle, 79, of Jenkintown, has received in return has been devoted friendships with many members of his audience, a strong purpose for his life, and now, a high honor.
NEWS
February 14, 1993 | By Inga Sandvoss, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James "Pops" Johnson has been recognized by the Coatesville City Council for distinguished service to the youth of Coatesville. Mary Frances Johnson, president of City Council, made the announcement last month in an official proclamation. For the last 30 years, Johnson has taught boys the art of boxing in the basement of Coatesville's YWCA. In November Johnson was one of three coaches in the tri-state area named USA Middle Atlantic Outstanding Boxing Coach for 1992. Lewis Green, one of Johnson's pupils, won the Middle Atlantic light- heavyweight championship last spring.
NEWS
August 10, 1986 | By William F. Allman
A quick science quiz: Is the Strategic Defense Initiative technologically feasible? Is genetic engineering a boon for agriculture or a potential disaster? Is the accident at Chernobyl a warning sign of an unacceptably hazardous technology, or an example of the risks our society must take to reduce the even greater hazard of releasing carbon dioxide into the atmosphere? Are those too tough? Then try this one: What is DNA? Don't feel too bad if you can't answer that question, either.
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