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NEWS
May 4, 2001
Michelle Malkin's column (April 30) is replete with the same elitist diatribe that anyone concerned with environmental issues has come to expect from the misinformed. Is the United States, leading source of environmental pollution, too good to abide by the Kyoto protocol while other nations are willing to abide by it? Her only valid point is that underdeveloped nations are experiencing threats of diarrhea and malaria, but she fails to mention that billions of dollars and a handful of decades have been spent to combat these diseases, sadly with little to no long-term success.
NEWS
November 13, 1986
If mankind learned anything over the years about new technology, it should have been this: The price of racing headlong with insufficient information can be very high. The examples are numerous: Widespread use of chemicals, radiation, drugs and medical procedures without first understanding their risks or consequences. Contrary to simple logic, uncertainty has not inspired caution. That's illustrated by the recent revelation that Philadelphia's Wistar Institute tested a rabies vaccine consisting of a genetically engineered virus in Argentina.
NEWS
October 13, 2005 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A leading science education expert, testifying in a federal trial over the teaching of evolution in a York County school district, said yesterday that introducing intelligent design into the science classroom is "detrimental" to learning. Brian Alters, a professor of science education at McGill University in Montreal, denounced a policy requiring a disclaimer on evolution be read in Dover Area School District high school biology classes, saying it "engenders misconceptions" about science.
NEWS
October 26, 2012
By Juliette Kayyem The conviction of seven Italian geological and disaster experts for failing to predict the 6.3-magnitude Aquila earthquake in 2009 has shocked the scientific community. Many are wondering whether the Dark Ages have returned to Italy. Galileo rarely trends on Twitter, but this week's verdict had many alluding to his 1633 heresy conviction for questioning whether the sun actually circled the Earth. The Earth is not the center of God's universe, and neither are scientists.
NEWS
July 11, 1995 | BY DAVE BARRY
Today I wish to present further evidence that the scientific community has completely lost its mind. Exhibit A is an article that appeared recently on the front page of the New York Times (motto: "Even we don't read the whole thing"). The article concerns a scientist named Dr. Raul J. Cano, who got hold of a bee that died 30 million years ago and was preserved in amber. Now here is the difference between a scientist and a sane layperson such as yourself: If you came across a bee that had been dead for 30 million years, your natural, common-sense reaction would be to stomp on it just in case, then maybe use it as part of a prank involving a salad bar. But that was not Dr. Cano's scientific reaction.
NEWS
December 22, 1996
Like any vital field of human endeavor, science can be plagued by polemics and controversy, egos, envies and ethical quandaries. How lucky we were, then, to have Carl Sagan around for 62 years to remind us that science is also rife with joy, wit, wonder and possibility. What Mr. Sagan, who died Friday in Seattle, managed to pack into his six decades was itself a marvel worthy of scientific study. Before a rare disease shut down his revving brain, he wrote more than 20 books, won the Pulitzer Prize, composed the article on "Life" in the Encyclopaedia Brittanica, designed the plaques that flew into interstellar space with the Pioneer 10 and 11 probes, worked on the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence project, did significant research in planetary astronomy, taught, married three times and fathered five children.
NEWS
February 3, 1997 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Arnost Kleinzeller, 82, professor emeritus of physiology at the University of Pennsylvania, died Saturday at his home in University City after a long illness. Professor Kleinzeller was an internationally known physiologist and biochemist whose groundbreaking scientific work demonstrated how kidney cells regulate the contents of water and salt and how they move sugars through tissue membranes, family members said. Professor Kleinzeller was a professor of physiology at Penn between 1967 and 1985, when he retired.
NEWS
December 22, 2005
Applaud ID ruling As professors of biology at the Community College of Philadelphia, we applaud the decision made by U.S. District Judge John E. Jones 3d on the teaching of Intelligent Design (ID) in science classrooms. Every major scientific organization in the country recognizes ID as a religious, not a scientific, concept since there is no way to gather objective experimental data to confirm or falsify it as a theory. Its supporters are primarily religious fundamentalists who cannot reconcile the supporting data of evolution with their faith.
NEWS
December 21, 2005 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ruling in the first trial on the teaching of intelligent design, a federal judge declared yesterday that the controversial idea cannot be taught in a York County school district as an alternative to the theory of evolution, and dismissed it as a mere "relabeling of creationism. " U.S. District Judge John E. Jones 3d, in a harshly worded opinion, rebuked an "ill-informed faction" on the Dover Area school board for adopting a religiously motivated policy that violated the separation of church and state.
NEWS
October 6, 2014
ISSUE | MED-MAL SUITS Outdated 'script Ten years ago, Pennsylvania's legislature and Supreme Court took responsible actions to reform the then-out-of-control system for trying claims of medical negligence ("Victims of medical negligence pay for reforms," Oct. 2). Those reforms included a requirement that lawyers have a case reviewed by a physician before bringing suit and that physicians only be sued in the county where the asserted medical negligence took place. These reforms have worked well to reduce frivolous claims and to limit forum-shopping.
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NEWS
December 17, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Bill Nye performed three sold-out shows in New York last summer, many in the audience copied his trademark by wearing bow ties. Look for a similar tribute Tuesday night among those who come to see him at the Merriam Theater. During a public appearance in February, however, the well-known science communicator counted just two audience members sporting his signature neckwear. The location? The Creation Museum in Petersburg, Ky. Nye, who gained fame as "Bill Nye the Science Guy" on public television in the '90s, debated museum founder and avowed creationist Ken Ham on the topic of evolution.
NEWS
October 6, 2014
ISSUE | MED-MAL SUITS Outdated 'script Ten years ago, Pennsylvania's legislature and Supreme Court took responsible actions to reform the then-out-of-control system for trying claims of medical negligence ("Victims of medical negligence pay for reforms," Oct. 2). Those reforms included a requirement that lawyers have a case reviewed by a physician before bringing suit and that physicians only be sued in the county where the asserted medical negligence took place. These reforms have worked well to reduce frivolous claims and to limit forum-shopping.
NEWS
October 26, 2012
By Juliette Kayyem The conviction of seven Italian geological and disaster experts for failing to predict the 6.3-magnitude Aquila earthquake in 2009 has shocked the scientific community. Many are wondering whether the Dark Ages have returned to Italy. Galileo rarely trends on Twitter, but this week's verdict had many alluding to his 1633 heresy conviction for questioning whether the sun actually circled the Earth. The Earth is not the center of God's universe, and neither are scientists.
NEWS
December 22, 2005
Applaud ID ruling As professors of biology at the Community College of Philadelphia, we applaud the decision made by U.S. District Judge John E. Jones 3d on the teaching of Intelligent Design (ID) in science classrooms. Every major scientific organization in the country recognizes ID as a religious, not a scientific, concept since there is no way to gather objective experimental data to confirm or falsify it as a theory. Its supporters are primarily religious fundamentalists who cannot reconcile the supporting data of evolution with their faith.
NEWS
December 21, 2005 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ruling in the first trial on the teaching of intelligent design, a federal judge declared yesterday that the controversial idea cannot be taught in a York County school district as an alternative to the theory of evolution, and dismissed it as a mere "relabeling of creationism. " U.S. District Judge John E. Jones 3d, in a harshly worded opinion, rebuked an "ill-informed faction" on the Dover Area school board for adopting a religiously motivated policy that violated the separation of church and state.
NEWS
October 13, 2005 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A leading science education expert, testifying in a federal trial over the teaching of evolution in a York County school district, said yesterday that introducing intelligent design into the science classroom is "detrimental" to learning. Brian Alters, a professor of science education at McGill University in Montreal, denounced a policy requiring a disclaimer on evolution be read in Dover Area School District high school biology classes, saying it "engenders misconceptions" about science.
NEWS
May 4, 2001
Michelle Malkin's column (April 30) is replete with the same elitist diatribe that anyone concerned with environmental issues has come to expect from the misinformed. Is the United States, leading source of environmental pollution, too good to abide by the Kyoto protocol while other nations are willing to abide by it? Her only valid point is that underdeveloped nations are experiencing threats of diarrhea and malaria, but she fails to mention that billions of dollars and a handful of decades have been spent to combat these diseases, sadly with little to no long-term success.
NEWS
May 24, 1998 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A pathology professor at the University of Southern California lifted the text from another researcher's grant application. At Dartmouth College, a psychology graduate student admitted misrepresenting data on tests involving animals. And a research-program coordinator at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine got into trouble by fabricating interviews with cancer patients. About 15 medical researchers a year are found by the federal Office of Research Integrity (ORI)
NEWS
February 3, 1997 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Arnost Kleinzeller, 82, professor emeritus of physiology at the University of Pennsylvania, died Saturday at his home in University City after a long illness. Professor Kleinzeller was an internationally known physiologist and biochemist whose groundbreaking scientific work demonstrated how kidney cells regulate the contents of water and salt and how they move sugars through tissue membranes, family members said. Professor Kleinzeller was a professor of physiology at Penn between 1967 and 1985, when he retired.
NEWS
December 22, 1996
Like any vital field of human endeavor, science can be plagued by polemics and controversy, egos, envies and ethical quandaries. How lucky we were, then, to have Carl Sagan around for 62 years to remind us that science is also rife with joy, wit, wonder and possibility. What Mr. Sagan, who died Friday in Seattle, managed to pack into his six decades was itself a marvel worthy of scientific study. Before a rare disease shut down his revving brain, he wrote more than 20 books, won the Pulitzer Prize, composed the article on "Life" in the Encyclopaedia Brittanica, designed the plaques that flew into interstellar space with the Pioneer 10 and 11 probes, worked on the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence project, did significant research in planetary astronomy, taught, married three times and fathered five children.
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