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NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When she found out early in her pregnancy that one of her identical twins would die at birth, Sarah Gray began a five-year journey that culminated last week in Philadelphia. She had to carry the sick baby to term in order to protect his healthy twin. And she also looked into organ and tissue donation. "Instead of thinking of our son as a victim," she said, "I started thinking of him as a contributor to research, to science. " On March 23, 2010, Thomas and Callum Gray were born at Fairfax Hospital in Virginia.
NEWS
January 27, 1992 | BY CHARLES PILLER, From the New York Times
In the latest urgent call for improvements in primary and secondary schools a panel of experts and politicians has recommended national curriculum standards and tests. The message of the National Council on Education Standards and Testing, like that of an Education Department report in September, is that inadequate education, particularly in mathematics and science, threatens our economic well-being, national identity and democratic institutions. Conspicuously absent from the debate has been any mention of a political issue integral to the problem: Students' poor performance mirrors their parents' alienation from those who decide about the risks and benefits of science and technology.
NEWS
March 15, 2004 | By Robert S. Boyd INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In a research program getting under way this summer, shipboard scientists will punch thousands of holes in the ocean bottom and take samples from greater depths than ever before. They will be investigating the biology, chemistry and physics of "inner space," the vast world hidden beneath the seas. The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, led by American and Japanese scientists, begins in June with a 10-month expedition to plumb the crust beneath the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. The layers of rock below the seafloor are an archive of global change, tens of millions of years old, that scientists say can help them understand what's happening to our world today.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | By Peter J. Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
Standing before a group of professional scientists, most of whom had their chins in their hands and were murmuring the obligatory "umm . . . interesting," Michael LaLena worked his way through a computer program that creates mazes and their solutions. He must have explained it pretty well, because within the hour the senior at La Salle College High School was given first prize at the Naval Air Development Center's first science fair. The fair was part of an open house Saturday at the facility in Warminster.
NEWS
August 17, 1988 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
There she stood, this would-be open-heart surgeon, untangling cat intestines as she spoke of how she once had wanted to be a hairdresser. Chanel Reed, 14, had wanted to be a hair stylist because she liked being creative with her hands. But since she became part of Camden's pipeline to the sciences last year, her hands aim for higher pursuits. Now, she said, "I want to explore the body, explore what it can do, what goes on inside yourself, makes you tick. " Reed, who is entering her sophomore year at Camden High School, has participated for the last two summers in the Camden Science Pipeline, a three- year program designed to stir enthusiasm for math and science, to increase the students' chances at succeeding in those subjects in high school and college, and to help them make science a career.
NEWS
November 27, 1988 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
An international team of scientists, alarmed by the threat to the Earth's ozone layer, is gathering in California today to prepare for the largest study ever done of the Arctic atmosphere. During the next two weeks, they will fine-tune scientific instruments in preparation for a $30 million expedition involving 200 scientists from seven nations that will be centered in Stavanger, Norway, from late December through mid-February. The scientific team - which includes William Brune of the Pennsylvania State University - will use high-altitude aircraft, balloons, satellites and sophisticated computers to seek to understand how the ozone layer is being eroded by manmade chemical pollutants in the Northern Hemisphere.
NEWS
July 19, 1991 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
While scientists have known for some time how the AIDS virus destroys the immune system, they have not understood how it enters the brain and central nervous system. Today, scientists at the University of Pennsylvania report the discovery of a possible way that the AIDS virus infects nerve cells - through a certain "docking point" on a cell. "Until now this has been a big puzzle," said Francisco Gonzalez-Scarano, associate professor of neurology and microbiology at Penn. "We now believe we have discovered the mechanism by which this infection occurs.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hilary Koprowski, an internationally known scientist who helped develop vaccines against rabies and polio, was awarded the prestigious Philadelphia Award last night. The $25,000 award, which is given annually to a Philadelphian who has set an example by serving the "best and largest interests of the community," was presented to Koprowski during ceremonies at the College of Physicians at 19 S. 22d St. Koprowski, 73, is giving the award to the Wistar Institute, which he has directed since 1957.
NEWS
December 7, 1986 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the initiated, the license plate says it all. GENOME is the moniker on Beatrice Mintz's light-blue Chevrolet in the staff parking lot at the Fox Chase Cancer Center. Lay folk who can't rattle off a definition of that word might prefer others to describe Mintz - words such as biologist, researcher, pioneer, member of the National Academy of Sciences and, as of last month, member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences. But her vanity plate expresses in only six PennDOT-approved letters the subject of the life's work that has brought the Fox Chase scientist so many honors.
NEWS
July 23, 2005
Most members of Congress who want to unravel a scientific controversy call a hearing. There, witnesses with opposing views make their best case. Or they call the National Academies of Science or another independent panel for expert advice. Not Texas Republican Joe Barton, chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee. He has opted for a witch hunt. Last month, Barton launched an investigation into the research and backgrounds of three prominent climate scientists.
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NEWS
August 24, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A few hundred times every year in the United States, a mysterious agent attacks the bile ducts of a newborn baby, often leading to a liver transplant. And several times over the last century, a mysterious agent attacked the bile ducts of lambs and other livestock in Australia, killing hundreds of animals in all. Plenty of pediatric liver researchers have wondered whether there was a connection. Could it be a virus? Genes? Rebecca G. Wells, a physician scientist at the University of Pennsylvania, dropped a line to Australia to see whether she could find out. The eventual result was a tale involving fluorescent fish, an odd-smelling plant, and painstaking chemical detective work to ferret out one fateful substance in that plant.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JOSEPH TERRANCE Heard had this dream. He would start a program for boys who have had discipline problems at school and encourage them to chase the same dream that led him to a successful career in science. It was part of Joe's lifelong commitment to encourage others to follow his path, which took him from a childhood of poverty in Philadelphia public housing to a fulfilling career in mathematics and science research. His brother, Justin, said Joe spent his "time and efforts mentoring many of the youth of our community trying to light the spark of knowledge and education wherever he could.
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert A. Roosa, 90, of Wayne, a retired microbiologist who supported scientists as a research institute administrator, died Friday, June 19, of a hemorrhage after falling. Dr. Roosa, who earned his Ph.D. in medical microbiology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1957, spent a long career at the Wistar Institute in University City, a biomedical research institution. He joined the organization in 1960 as a researcher, working in a lab, and later went on to oversee several facilities as a science administrator.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Somewhere in a remote part of Canada, antennae are likely picking up the signals of 100 shorebirds that just weeks ago were on the beaches of Delaware Bay, where they were caught with giant nets and fitted with tiny transmitters. The birds are robin-size creatures called red knots. After precipitous declines in their population on the bay - from about 100,000 birds in the 1990s to about 12,000 a few years ago - federal officials designated them as threatened in December. Researchers know that red knots have one of the longest migrations on the planet - from the tip of South America to their breeding grounds in the Arctic.
NEWS
June 3, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Russell Turner, 103, of Ardmore, a senior research scientist at the Atlantic Richfield Co. from 1940 to 1971 and a member of the Philadelphia Stock Exchange from 1971 to 1994, died Wednesday, May 20, of respiratory failure at home. Mr. Turner was born in the coal region of Schuylkill County. His father died when he was 6, so he learned to find his way at an early age. He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania and was first employed by ARCO as an operator in the cracking department of a refinery, where petroleum crude is converted into gasoline and other products.
SPORTS
May 5, 2015 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
IT IS STILL to be determined whether Chip Kelly is a genius, but at least after this weekend's NFL draft we can say that he is not a mad scientist. For a mad scientist, the vision is all that matters. The consequences of what it might cost in the attempt to achieve it become irrelevant. Mad scientists are reckless. There is little that is comforting about their experimentation. Success is due to random luck, not well-conceived design. Failure is just as likely. Mad scientists are unreliable.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
AS A YOUNGSTER growing up in King of Prussia with a fascination for science and math, Jayatri Das enjoyed spending time at the Franklin Institute. As with many Philadelphia-area students, walking through the giant heart made an impression on her. Today, Jayatri Das, Ph.D., is chief bioscientist at the institute, where she led the team that created the museum's largest exhibit, Your Brain, which opened last June. Tonight, Das will be among four women scientists to be spotlighted in the fifth annual "Color of Science" program at the Franklin Institute.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Snowy owls, with 5-foot wingspans and piercing yellow gazes, are a rare sight in this region, so far from their high Arctic realm. Last winter, however, the majestic birds showed up in numbers not seen in half a century. Birders declared it a once-in-a-lifetime event. Incredibly, it is happening again. The owls are back this winter, if not quite as abundantly. Their appearance over the last two years has sent researchers into a frenzy of data-gathering on a species that has given up little about where it goes, what it does, and why. During snowy owl "irruptions," unusually high numbers travel south for the coldest months, out of Canada and into the United States.
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Light, or more precisely the lack of it, is literally one of the most depressing things about winter. In fact, each year, winter's gloom makes 1 percent to 5 percent of us so miserable we'd qualify for a diagnosis of major depression. Up to a quarter more of us just feel sluggish, sleepy, and unusually attracted to carbs. Normalcy returns with May's flowers. George Brainard's fascination with this phenomenon, known as Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD, has taken him from Earth to space and back again.
NEWS
January 20, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Evelyn Walker Armstrong, 87, of Jenkintown, an information scientist and philanthropist, died Saturday, Jan. 10, of multiple myeloma at her home in Rydal Park. Ms. Armstrong spent 43 years - from 1949 to 1992 - in scientific information services at the Merck Research Laboratories of Merck & Co. in West Point, Montgomery County, and in Rahway, N.J. As director of the Merck Literature Resources Center, she headed the design, development, and operation of eight information centers in research and operating divisions in New Jersey and Pennsylvania.
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