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July 16, 2014 | BY DANA DIFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE WAY David M. Jacobs sees it, aliens from outer space have been kidnapping humans for aeons and sexually molesting them to create human-alien hybrids that walk among us today undetected and will soon take over Earth. He knows that sounds crazy. But he long ago quit caring what people think of him. As director of the International Center for Abduction Research, Jacobs, 71, has made it his life's mission to investigate claims of extraterrestrial abduction. "What I'm doing will either be an interesting but nonessential footnote to popular culture or the most important thing that's ever happened to humankind.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A central question in the debate over a Rutgers University-led study of the ocean floor off the coast of Long Beach Island is whether the loud sound waves used to map the sediment will harm dolphins, whales, and other animals. It is an area of scientific research that has been getting more attention since the mid-1990s, when researchers generated loud sounds in the Pacific Ocean to study the effect of water temperature on sound. People began to wonder whether marine mammals could hear the sound and, if so, if that was bad. Since then, scientists have trained some of the more intelligent species, such as dolphins, to tap a paddle when they hear a sound.
NEWS
January 27, 1992 | BY CHARLES PILLER, From the New York Times
In the latest urgent call for improvements in primary and secondary schools a panel of experts and politicians has recommended national curriculum standards and tests. The message of the National Council on Education Standards and Testing, like that of an Education Department report in September, is that inadequate education, particularly in mathematics and science, threatens our economic well-being, national identity and democratic institutions. Conspicuously absent from the debate has been any mention of a political issue integral to the problem: Students' poor performance mirrors their parents' alienation from those who decide about the risks and benefits of science and technology.
NEWS
March 15, 2004 | By Robert S. Boyd INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In a research program getting under way this summer, shipboard scientists will punch thousands of holes in the ocean bottom and take samples from greater depths than ever before. They will be investigating the biology, chemistry and physics of "inner space," the vast world hidden beneath the seas. The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, led by American and Japanese scientists, begins in June with a 10-month expedition to plumb the crust beneath the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. The layers of rock below the seafloor are an archive of global change, tens of millions of years old, that scientists say can help them understand what's happening to our world today.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | By Peter J. Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
Standing before a group of professional scientists, most of whom had their chins in their hands and were murmuring the obligatory "umm . . . interesting," Michael LaLena worked his way through a computer program that creates mazes and their solutions. He must have explained it pretty well, because within the hour the senior at La Salle College High School was given first prize at the Naval Air Development Center's first science fair. The fair was part of an open house Saturday at the facility in Warminster.
NEWS
August 17, 1988 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
There she stood, this would-be open-heart surgeon, untangling cat intestines as she spoke of how she once had wanted to be a hairdresser. Chanel Reed, 14, had wanted to be a hair stylist because she liked being creative with her hands. But since she became part of Camden's pipeline to the sciences last year, her hands aim for higher pursuits. Now, she said, "I want to explore the body, explore what it can do, what goes on inside yourself, makes you tick. " Reed, who is entering her sophomore year at Camden High School, has participated for the last two summers in the Camden Science Pipeline, a three- year program designed to stir enthusiasm for math and science, to increase the students' chances at succeeding in those subjects in high school and college, and to help them make science a career.
NEWS
November 27, 1988 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
An international team of scientists, alarmed by the threat to the Earth's ozone layer, is gathering in California today to prepare for the largest study ever done of the Arctic atmosphere. During the next two weeks, they will fine-tune scientific instruments in preparation for a $30 million expedition involving 200 scientists from seven nations that will be centered in Stavanger, Norway, from late December through mid-February. The scientific team - which includes William Brune of the Pennsylvania State University - will use high-altitude aircraft, balloons, satellites and sophisticated computers to seek to understand how the ozone layer is being eroded by manmade chemical pollutants in the Northern Hemisphere.
NEWS
July 19, 1991 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
While scientists have known for some time how the AIDS virus destroys the immune system, they have not understood how it enters the brain and central nervous system. Today, scientists at the University of Pennsylvania report the discovery of a possible way that the AIDS virus infects nerve cells - through a certain "docking point" on a cell. "Until now this has been a big puzzle," said Francisco Gonzalez-Scarano, associate professor of neurology and microbiology at Penn. "We now believe we have discovered the mechanism by which this infection occurs.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hilary Koprowski, an internationally known scientist who helped develop vaccines against rabies and polio, was awarded the prestigious Philadelphia Award last night. The $25,000 award, which is given annually to a Philadelphian who has set an example by serving the "best and largest interests of the community," was presented to Koprowski during ceremonies at the College of Physicians at 19 S. 22d St. Koprowski, 73, is giving the award to the Wistar Institute, which he has directed since 1957.
NEWS
December 7, 1986 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the initiated, the license plate says it all. GENOME is the moniker on Beatrice Mintz's light-blue Chevrolet in the staff parking lot at the Fox Chase Cancer Center. Lay folk who can't rattle off a definition of that word might prefer others to describe Mintz - words such as biologist, researcher, pioneer, member of the National Academy of Sciences and, as of last month, member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences. But her vanity plate expresses in only six PennDOT-approved letters the subject of the life's work that has brought the Fox Chase scientist so many honors.
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NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A central question in the debate over a Rutgers University-led study of the ocean floor off the coast of Long Beach Island is whether the loud sound waves used to map the sediment will harm dolphins, whales, and other animals. It is an area of scientific research that has been getting more attention since the mid-1990s, when researchers generated loud sounds in the Pacific Ocean to study the effect of water temperature on sound. People began to wonder whether marine mammals could hear the sound and, if so, if that was bad. Since then, scientists have trained some of the more intelligent species, such as dolphins, to tap a paddle when they hear a sound.
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Simon Kaschock-Marenda needed a science project for his sixth-grade class at Masterman School and was intrigued by the fact that his parents had just cut back on sugar in their diet. Because his father, Drexel University biologist Daniel Marenda, worked with fruit flies, the boy thought it might be interesting to feed sugar and other sweeteners to some flies. Was it ever. Regular sugar was OK, but the flies that ate the sweetener Truvia were dead within a few days. Daniel Marenda was skeptical, so he helped his son redo the experiment.
NEWS
June 2, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
Karen Glanz is a behavioral epidemiologist at the University of Pennsylvania. Much of her work focuses on applying the social sciences to encourage healthy behavior in individuals and communities. She studies the effects of the environment, nutrition, and exercise on obesity and the prevention of such ailments as cancer and heart disease. Her work presents constant challenges, which Glanz relishes. It is also largely sedentary. As she puts it, "I spend a lot of time on my behind in front of a computer.
NEWS
May 21, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maurice R. Stahler Jr., 88, formerly of King of Prussia, a retired scientist and engineering manager, died Tuesday, May 6, of causes related to aging at Hope Hospice in Fort Myers, Fla. Mr. Stahler was an Army veteran of World War II who was honorably discharged in July 1946, according to newspaper reports at the time. Born and schooled in the Harrisburg area, he came to the Philadelphia area, where he joined the General Electric Astro Space Division in Valley Forge, now Lockheed Martin.
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
STATE COLLEGE The selection of noted climate scientist Eric J. Barron to lead Pennsylvania State University, a decision expected to be approved Monday by the trustees, reflects the importance of research to the university's future and its role as a jobs engine for the state, the executive director of the school's alumni association said Saturday. Roger L. Williams said he was delighted with reports that Barron would become Penn State's next president, ending a long search to replace Graham B. Spanier, who was forced out in 2011 over his handling of the Jerry Sandusky child-molestation scandal.
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Solar panels generate electricity by absorbing sunlight, but that is only half the battle. Once electrons in the panel are energized, they must be channeled in the same direction - a process that typically requires a panel made with layers of two kinds of material. Not in the future, if a team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Drexel University can help it. In a new study published online by the journal Nature, the scientists reported they had created a new class of ceramic material that could accomplish both tasks cheaply and efficiently.
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A father came to visit ophthalmology researcher Jean Bennett last week to talk about his son, who is swiftly going blind. Her clinical trial of a one-time injection to cure the inherited disease is scheduled to begin in July. " 'If this was your son, wouldn't you just take him into your basement and inject him? Why do we have to wait this long?' " Bennett recalled his saying. She added: "I haven't even told him that it could be delayed. " These are the kinds of stories that scientists tell about how events in Washington - stagnant appropriations followed by sequestration, the government shutdown, and now negotiations on future budget cuts to avoid another crisis early next year - affect them.
NEWS
September 8, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
In very rare cases, using radiation to kill the primary tumor of a patient with metastatic cancer leads to the disappearance of tumors throughout the body. Scientists can't explain this amazing collateral effect, but it seems to activate an antitumor immune response. Mohan Doss, a medical physicist at Fox Chase Cancer Center, believes the distant tumors melt away because of incidental low-dose rays emanating from the high-dose therapy. And that bolsters a theory he has researched for years: radiation at or slightly above natural background levels can stimulate the body's disease-fighting defenses.
NEWS
June 29, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a third-year doctoral student in chemistry confided that she planned to quit school in favor of her first love - the cello - Hai-Lung Dai advised her against it. "If you pursue music, you have to be at the very top to really support your interest," Dai, then chair of the chemistry department at the University of Pennsylvania, recalled telling the young woman, one of his best students. Finish the degree and pursue music on the side, he told her. That's what he did, and he couldn't be happier.
NEWS
May 30, 2013
HAROLD HAMBROSE, 46, of West Mount Airy, is chief executive of Electronic Ink, a business-consulting firm he founded in 1990 that's based on South Broad Street across from City Hall . Hambrose - who summed up his philosophy in a 2009 book, Wrench in the System - says the company makes it easier for people to use computer systems and helps clients better understand how their employees work. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for Electronic Ink? A: It started because software developers were just creating tools to make computers more functional, and I felt designers should be involved.
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