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NEWS
January 27, 1992 | BY CHARLES PILLER, From the New York Times
In the latest urgent call for improvements in primary and secondary schools a panel of experts and politicians has recommended national curriculum standards and tests. The message of the National Council on Education Standards and Testing, like that of an Education Department report in September, is that inadequate education, particularly in mathematics and science, threatens our economic well-being, national identity and democratic institutions. Conspicuously absent from the debate has been any mention of a political issue integral to the problem: Students' poor performance mirrors their parents' alienation from those who decide about the risks and benefits of science and technology.
NEWS
March 15, 2004 | By Robert S. Boyd INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In a research program getting under way this summer, shipboard scientists will punch thousands of holes in the ocean bottom and take samples from greater depths than ever before. They will be investigating the biology, chemistry and physics of "inner space," the vast world hidden beneath the seas. The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, led by American and Japanese scientists, begins in June with a 10-month expedition to plumb the crust beneath the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. The layers of rock below the seafloor are an archive of global change, tens of millions of years old, that scientists say can help them understand what's happening to our world today.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | By Peter J. Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
Standing before a group of professional scientists, most of whom had their chins in their hands and were murmuring the obligatory "umm . . . interesting," Michael LaLena worked his way through a computer program that creates mazes and their solutions. He must have explained it pretty well, because within the hour the senior at La Salle College High School was given first prize at the Naval Air Development Center's first science fair. The fair was part of an open house Saturday at the facility in Warminster.
NEWS
August 17, 1988 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
There she stood, this would-be open-heart surgeon, untangling cat intestines as she spoke of how she once had wanted to be a hairdresser. Chanel Reed, 14, had wanted to be a hair stylist because she liked being creative with her hands. But since she became part of Camden's pipeline to the sciences last year, her hands aim for higher pursuits. Now, she said, "I want to explore the body, explore what it can do, what goes on inside yourself, makes you tick. " Reed, who is entering her sophomore year at Camden High School, has participated for the last two summers in the Camden Science Pipeline, a three- year program designed to stir enthusiasm for math and science, to increase the students' chances at succeeding in those subjects in high school and college, and to help them make science a career.
NEWS
November 27, 1988 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
An international team of scientists, alarmed by the threat to the Earth's ozone layer, is gathering in California today to prepare for the largest study ever done of the Arctic atmosphere. During the next two weeks, they will fine-tune scientific instruments in preparation for a $30 million expedition involving 200 scientists from seven nations that will be centered in Stavanger, Norway, from late December through mid-February. The scientific team - which includes William Brune of the Pennsylvania State University - will use high-altitude aircraft, balloons, satellites and sophisticated computers to seek to understand how the ozone layer is being eroded by manmade chemical pollutants in the Northern Hemisphere.
NEWS
July 19, 1991 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
While scientists have known for some time how the AIDS virus destroys the immune system, they have not understood how it enters the brain and central nervous system. Today, scientists at the University of Pennsylvania report the discovery of a possible way that the AIDS virus infects nerve cells - through a certain "docking point" on a cell. "Until now this has been a big puzzle," said Francisco Gonzalez-Scarano, associate professor of neurology and microbiology at Penn. "We now believe we have discovered the mechanism by which this infection occurs.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hilary Koprowski, an internationally known scientist who helped develop vaccines against rabies and polio, was awarded the prestigious Philadelphia Award last night. The $25,000 award, which is given annually to a Philadelphian who has set an example by serving the "best and largest interests of the community," was presented to Koprowski during ceremonies at the College of Physicians at 19 S. 22d St. Koprowski, 73, is giving the award to the Wistar Institute, which he has directed since 1957.
NEWS
December 7, 1986 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the initiated, the license plate says it all. GENOME is the moniker on Beatrice Mintz's light-blue Chevrolet in the staff parking lot at the Fox Chase Cancer Center. Lay folk who can't rattle off a definition of that word might prefer others to describe Mintz - words such as biologist, researcher, pioneer, member of the National Academy of Sciences and, as of last month, member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences. But her vanity plate expresses in only six PennDOT-approved letters the subject of the life's work that has brought the Fox Chase scientist so many honors.
NEWS
July 23, 2005
Most members of Congress who want to unravel a scientific controversy call a hearing. There, witnesses with opposing views make their best case. Or they call the National Academies of Science or another independent panel for expert advice. Not Texas Republican Joe Barton, chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee. He has opted for a witch hunt. Last month, Barton launched an investigation into the research and backgrounds of three prominent climate scientists.
NEWS
March 16, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last spring, when physicist David Wright began asking Cornell University faculty members to sign a pledge refusing to participate in "Star Wars" research, a colleague told him he would be lucky if 10 percent agreed to sign. But Wright, who is now a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania, felt that it was important to take a stand against the Reagan administration's plan to develop a shield against nuclear attack. He felt that the Strategic Defense Initiative, commonly known as Star Wars, was both technically unworkable and morally wrong.
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NEWS
April 4, 2016
BUCKS | CHESCO | DELCO | MONTCO | PHILADELPHIA
BUSINESS
March 29, 2016 | Mike Zebe Staff
The Philadelphia intellectual-property firm Panitch Schwarze Belisario & Nadel L.L.P. has hired Jifang Tao as a scientific adviser to support the firm's patent work on behalf of clients in biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries. Tao was a postdoctoral fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a graduate student and research assistant at University of California, Los Angeles. Tao earned her bachelor of science degree in biological sciences with a minor in English from Tsinghua University, Beijing, with honors, and her Ph.D.
NEWS
February 25, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Tide gauges show that average sea levels have been steadily rising since the late 1800s, a worrisome trend that scientists blame on emissions of heat-trapping greenhouse gases. But what about the centuries before then, when those gauges were mostly nonexistent? Part of the answer, a team of researchers reported this week, lies in the salt marshes of South Jersey. In a study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, authors calculated sea levels over thousands of years by analyzing cores of sediment from the salt marshes and 23 other geological sites around the world.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2016 | By Chris Mondics and Sam Wood, STAFF WRITERS
Two GlaxoSmithKline scientists and three others were charged by a federal grand jury in Philadelphia on Wednesday with conspiracy to steal promising cancer research secrets from the pharmaceutical giant and market them to companies in China backed by the Chinese government. U.S. Attorney Zane David Memeger said Yu Xue, 45, of Wayne; Tao Li, 42, and Yan Mei, 36, both of Nanjing China; Tian Xue, 45, of Charlotte, N.C.; and Lucy Xi, 38, of West Lake Village, Calif., were named in the indictment.
NEWS
January 17, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
Vice President Biden met with scientists at the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center Friday afternoon, officially launching his "moonshot" quest to cure cancer. "We're on the cusp of phenomenal breakthroughs," Biden said, adding that President Obama would be issuing an executive order that would get every federal agency involved in the effort. Biden asked the researchers to educate him on the challenges and possibilities of genome-based discoveries of the last several years, particularly a type of immunotherapy that has been pioneered by Penn researcher Carl H. June.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2016
The gang now running DuPont Co. , that incubator of 20th-century U.S. industry, is scrapping many of its Wilmington headquarters institutions, as if they were old Rust Belt factories. Glowing paints and super plastics, miracle fabrics and insulators, electronics and fuel additives and their often toxic by-products are just a few of DuPont's highlights. Its science and engineering created that new-car smell, the snug and cleanable feel of a mass-marketed American home, and the security and menace of a fully equipped American soldier.
NEWS
December 26, 2015
Alfred Gilman, 74, a scientist who won a Nobel Prize for his breakthrough research into the inner workings of cells, and the former dean of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, has died. A school spokesman said Thursday that Dr. Gilman's death was reported by his family. He had been fighting pancreatic cancer. Dr. Gilman shared a 1994 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Martin Rodbell of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences for their discovery of G proteins.
NEWS
November 13, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 1,400 light-years away, in a constellation named for its likeness to a swan, lies a planet a lot like Earth. Called Kepler-452b, it orbits a star similar to our sun, at just the right distance so that its surface temperature would allow the presence of liquid water. We would have no idea it was out there, along with more than 1,000 other planets discovered in the last six years, but for the stubbornness of William J. Borucki. The NASA astronomer is one of eight new winners of the annual awards bestowed by the Franklin Institute being announced Thursday.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2015
'Herding cats," is how Dario C. Altieri describes his job leading the brainy scientists who form the heart of the workforce at Wistar Institute in West Philadelphia. "It's built into the job - a strong sense of independence," said Altieri, 57, in his melodic Italian accent, which he undersells as "straight out of the Bronx or South Philly. " In March, Altieri moved from herded to herder, promoted from the Institute's chief scientific officer and Wistar Cancer Center director, to chief executive and president, succeeding Russel Kaufman, who led Wistar for 12 years.
NEWS
October 25, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
They're everywhere. Too small to be seen by the unaided eye and too numerous to count, they inhabit our insides and outsides, our guts and the surface of our skin. They are the bacteria, viruses, parasites, and other organisms that make up what scientists call our microbiome. It's a complex environment, and scientists are only just beginning to understand and appreciate its vitally important role in keeping us healthy and signaling when we are sick. This week, Penn Vet, Penn Medicine, and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia will host their second annual microbiome symposium.
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