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NEWS
August 20, 2011
TRENTON - Environmental officials are tracking an unusually large algae bloom off the Jersey Shore. Officials say the bloom, which extends nearly 100 miles, is not expected to pose any danger to people or marine life. It is believed to be a naturally driven event, with the mass of microscopic plants growing on nutrients pulled up from deep waters by upwelling. The bloom is several miles offshore and runs along roughly two-thirds of the New Jersey coastline, from the southern end of Monmouth County to Cape May. - AP
NEWS
June 30, 2000 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Swedish scientists announced yesterday that they have developed robots with "fingers" small enough to potentially pick up an individual human cell. The microrobots, barely bigger than the period at the end of this sentence, might eventually have the ability to distinguish between healthy and damaged cells. Arrays of such robots might one day perform surgeries with a precision that would make the scalpels of the most skilled surgeons seem like the blundering of bulls in china shops.
NEWS
August 2, 2002 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Earth appears to have grown less round - fatter around the middle and flatter at the poles - since 1998, a finding that has scientists struggling for an explanation. A team from Raytheon Co. and NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, both in Greenbelt, Md., measured this shape shift by monitoring tiny changes in the orbits of nine satellites. The finding, published in today's issue of the journal Science, was unexpected, lead researcher Christopher Cox of Raytheon said. He suspects that the cause is water shifting toward the equator.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1986 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Having fun at the convention?" The woman delegate from Massachusetts cast an indignant eye upon the questioner. "Fun? Certainly not!" You bet your biosphere, Bunky. This is the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and if you are looking for whoopee cushions and electric bow ties, you are barking up the wrong convention. Ask an expert. "It's grim," said social psychologist James W. Pennebaker of Southern Methodist University. He had been asked to describe the social atmosphere of the convention, which brought about 4,000 scientists to town on Sunday for a week of papers, programs, symposiums and seminars.
NEWS
January 16, 1991 | BY CAL THOMAS
The Big Bang theory, which holds that the origin of the universe was a mass the size of a single atom that exploded and scattered matter throughout the cosmos, has been declared invalid. The Infrared Astronomical Satellite has revealed that the universe is full of superstructures and companion supervoids that appear far too vast to have formed since the Big Bang. Many scientists and textbooks have taught the Big Bang theory as fact for decades. Those who inquired after other possible origins of the universe, including the theory that a God might have created it all, often have been denounced and their ideas expelled by court order on grounds that they are not "scientific.
NEWS
January 25, 1997 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
French scientists say they have identified a Paris family in which three people might have infected one another with the AIDS virus through casual contact. The hypothesis runs counter to hundreds of scientific studies over the last decade that have proven the virus is passed on primarily through unprotected sex or infected syringes. But the French researchers, who acknowledge that fact, said they could find no other explanation for the mysterious case of patients PA, SI and RO - the code names they gave the three family members to protect their identities.
NEWS
October 11, 2005 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a Pennsylvania courtroom, the legal debate grinds on over whether to teach "intelligent design" alongside Darwin's theory of evolution. But for the overwhelming majority of the scientific community, the debate was over long ago: Evolution won. "A lot of us don't think about this anymore, and we don't worry about it anymore because it is settled," said Paul Sniegowski, an associate professor of biology at the University of Pennsylvania....
NEWS
May 24, 1987 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The new ceramiclike materials known as superconductors - developed in the last six months by scientists in Philadelphia and around the world - promise nothing less than a technological revolution akin to the development of the transistor and computer. They could lead to the development of 300-mile-an-hour trains, faster and smaller computers, electric cars and still-undreamed-of advances, scientists say. But a growing concern among some scientists threatens to dampen the excitement over the latest advances.
NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Sam Wood, PHILLY.COM
Holy Hogwarts! Scientists are one step closer to creating a real version of Harry Potter's Cloak of Invisibility. A team of physicists announced Monday they had successfully hidden a seven-inch cylinder from a microwave imaging device with a "three-dimensional stand-alone mantle cloak. " The cloak is constructed out of a "metasurface," an ultrafine mesh of copper-tape filaments, each thinner than a human hair, according to the team's paper published in the New Journal of Physics . The fishnet design of the metasurface scattered radiowaves in a pattern that was opposite to those reflected from the cylinder, said the team which is based at the University of Texas at Austin.
NEWS
July 12, 1986 | BY MARY MCGRORY
It is, to say the least, remarkable: history's first private-sector nuclear peace initiative. A team of seven U.S. scientists is even now setting up shop in a corner of the Soviet desert, putting in place state-of-the-art seismographic equipment to monitor any Soviet nuclear blasts. Business may be slow, since the Soviets are still observing their self- imposed moratorium, which is due to expire on Aug. 6, the 41st anniversary of the atomic bomb burst over Hiroshima. But the mere fact that the United States is there, on a previously forbidden stretch of Soviet soil near the Soviets' principal test site, is noteworthy.
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