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NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Sam Wood, PHILLY.COM
Holy Hogwarts! Scientists are one step closer to creating a real version of Harry Potter's Cloak of Invisibility. A team of physicists announced Monday they had successfully hidden a seven-inch cylinder from a microwave imaging device with a "three-dimensional stand-alone mantle cloak. " The cloak is constructed out of a "metasurface," an ultrafine mesh of copper-tape filaments, each thinner than a human hair, according to the team's paper published in the New Journal of Physics . The fishnet design of the metasurface scattered radiowaves in a pattern that was opposite to those reflected from the cylinder, said the team which is based at the University of Texas at Austin.
NEWS
July 12, 1986 | BY MARY MCGRORY
It is, to say the least, remarkable: history's first private-sector nuclear peace initiative. A team of seven U.S. scientists is even now setting up shop in a corner of the Soviet desert, putting in place state-of-the-art seismographic equipment to monitor any Soviet nuclear blasts. Business may be slow, since the Soviets are still observing their self- imposed moratorium, which is due to expire on Aug. 6, the 41st anniversary of the atomic bomb burst over Hiroshima. But the mere fact that the United States is there, on a previously forbidden stretch of Soviet soil near the Soviets' principal test site, is noteworthy.
NEWS
August 18, 2010 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
  At first, Adam Maloof thought they were just mud chips. But after seeing more and more of the red flecks in an ancient section of rocky mountains in South Australia, he noticed they came in odd shapes: tiny rings, anvils, and wishbones. The Princeton University geologist and colleague Catherine V. Rose wondered: Could the flecks, dated to 650 million years ago, be the remnants of living things? After months of sophisticated analysis back in the United States, the scientists made a dramatic announcement Tuesday: They think the odd shapes are the fossils of sponge-like creatures - the earliest animals yet discovered by more than 70 million years.
NEWS
September 27, 2010 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A man in a baseball cap parked a big telescope in an unlikely location recently: the sidewalk at Second and Chestnut Streets. He offered the nighttime crowd in Old City a chance to look at the heavens, but he was also on a scouting mission of sorts. Derrick Pitts was testing the city's appetite for a serious avalanche of science. It was just the merest taste of what is coming here next spring. On Monday, the Franklin Institute and two dozen partners plan to announce the first Philadelphia Science Festival, a two-week celebration of science starting April 15. The festivities include an outdoor science carnival on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, a science night with the Phillies at Citizens Bank Park, movies, lectures, hands-on experiments, demonstrations, and quiz shows.
NEWS
May 15, 1988 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
While some administration officials may be embarrassed by the recent reports that Nancy Reagan relies on an astrologer to draw up the President's schedule, they shouldn't worry too much about what the public will think. Mrs. Reagan has a lot of company. Nearly two-thirds of Americans read astrology reports occasionally, and about 40 percent believe that horoscopes are scientifically credible, the National Science Foundation has found. Not only do an estimated 50 million Americans regularly follow astrology, but 12 million also say they have changed their behavior as a result of astrological advice.
NEWS
July 31, 1990 | By Maida Odom, Inquirer Staff Writer
Morley Richard Kare, 68, a distinguished scientist whose research into the mysteries of smell and taste made a major contribution to the world's understanding of sensory physiology, died yesterday at his home in Narberth. Dr. Kare, a professor of physiology at the University of Pennsylvania since 1968, founded and ran the Monell Chemical Senses Center, an internationally known research and training institution in Philadelphia. He was recognized as a leader, innovator, teacher and administrator in both academia and industry, according to a spokeswoman for Monell.
NEWS
October 21, 2012
The Secret Anarchy of Science By Michael Brooks Overlook. 320 pp. $26.95. Reviewed by John Timpane Science reporting and writing suffer the same malady we've had for years with business writing, or writing about the Internet. Almost everyone who writes about it is either a salesperson, pitching like heck for the home team; a current or former practitioner; or a cheerleader. So you never get a straight deal. With science, it's hard not to cheerlead. Its successes, in technology, engineering, and medicine, are spectacular and world-transforming.
LIVING
November 3, 1997 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was an announcement that was bound to spark similar claims. Last year, a team of NASA and Stanford University scientists unveiled a colony of possible Martian microorganisms, fossilized and embedded in a meteorite. Now another scientist says he found similar wiggly, wormlike forms lodged in another space rock. NASA astrophysicist Richard Hoover says he identified the fossil bugs in a piece of the Murchison meteorite, named for the place in Australia where it fell in 1969.
NEWS
February 8, 2007 | By Mary Brumder and Kathleen Rest
The Bush administration's suppression and distortion of scientific research in federal agencies has been both widespread and remarkable - and it cannot be allowed to continue. The new Congress has an opportunity to restore integrity and objectivity to federal science, and prevent its continued manipulation for political purposes. To achieve this, Congress must protect the whistle-blower rights of federal government scientists. By continually weakening critical science agencies, this administration is threatening our nation's unparalleled legacy of scientific achievement.
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | By LEONARD LARSEN, Scripps Howard News Service
Over history's long march we can thank the world's scientists for many of life's wonders as we know and enjoy them - the wheel, flush toilets, ballpoint pens, atomic bombs and Jeeps driven by young maniacs. And we can also thank scientists for what have become endless informative commentaries about our world, its beginnings and its doom, a torrent of commentaries of such variety it seems there are as many scientific conclusions as there are scientists to conclude. In a widening stream of articles and broadcasts which typically begin, "Scientists say . . . " we're assured on a weekly basis that the planet is warming, that it's not warming and it might be cooling, that the data are too sketchy to make a judgment and it doesn't make any difference in the long run anyway because these things have been happening for eons and it's best to relax and try to think about something pleasant.
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