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ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2010
Here's some of the stuff you're likely to find during a visit to Scotland. Haggis: Scottish dish tastes and looks like dark meat oatmeal. It's actually not as bad as, say, blood pudding. Secret of its delicious taste? Sheep guts (heart, liver, lung). Scottish money: It's the same pound sterling denomination as in England, but it's printed with different pictures. Scottish brogue: Not hard to understand unless you're talking to footballers or find yourself in Glasgow.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | By Stephen Birnbaum, Special to The Inquirer
I've always wanted to see the British Open, but I never had any success in booking accommodations anywhere near where this event was taking place, and my travel agent didn't know of any tours I might take. Do you have information on a tour package that includes the British Open in Scotland this year? There are several tours that will get you to the British Open Golf Championship, which will be held July 16 to 19 at the Muirfield course, in the town of Gullane, about 20 miles east of Edinburgh, Scotland.
NEWS
April 17, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Among the many areas in the world where bird watching is a great sport, Scotland's northern highlands hold their own. The nearly treeless highlands make for great bird-watching territory, as visitors can quickly spot skylarks, swallows, martins, ravens and other hill and forest birds as well as birds of prey - golden eagles, peregrine falcons, hawks, buzzards. The sea cliffs to the north are home to puffins, razorbills, oyster catchers and gulls. One way to spy on the hundreds of birds that arrive in late April to mid- July on their way to the northern summer nesting grounds is to check into the Borrobol Lodge, a six-bedroom, wood-paneled sporting lodge in the northern highlands.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
GREAT SCOT. The U.S. Department of Transportation has cleared the way for three airlines American, Northwest and British Airways - to fly nonstop from the United States to Abbotsinch Airport, 15 minutes from downtown Glasgow, Scotland, and about 45 minutes from Edinburgh. The move, if matched, as expected, by the British government, should increase American tour packages to Scotland and also relieve some of the congestion at London's overcrowded Heathrow and Gatwick Airports. It could make Abbotsinch a third United Kingdom jumping-off spot for flights on to Europe, Africa and Asia.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, Special to The Inquirer
With a grunt, the brawny man lifted the 22-pound wooden rod with an iron ball on its end. Swinging it three times around his head, he let it fly with a guttural "arghhhhhh" that echoed through the South Oval on the Devon Horse Show grounds Saturday. As the "hammer" settled in the arena dust, two women ran out to measure the throw. On his second throw of the three-throw contest, Kurt Pauli of Saxonburg, Pa., 19, had flung the ancient tool more than 66 feet, making him leader in the field of 11 amateurs competing in the centuries-old field event at the 25th Delco Scottish Games.
SPORTS
July 11, 1992 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Germany's Bernhard Langer shot a 3-under-par 67 to take a 3-stroke lead after the third round of the Scottish Open golf tournament. Langer reached the 54-hole mark yesterday with a 14-under total of 196, 4 off the European record by Anders Forsbrand five years ago. Blustery winds pushed up the scores yesterday, one day after England's Paul Curry shot a 60 to beat the course record by 2 strokes. PGA WILLIAMSBURG, Va. - Morris Hatalsky increased his lead to 3 strokes with a 5-under-par 66 in the second round of the Anheuser-Busch Classic.
NEWS
November 23, 1986 | By Frank Langfitt, Special to The Inquirer
Margaret Taggart Allan, born in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1906, died on Nov. 15 at her home in Bryn Mawr. She was 80. In 1930, at the age of 24, she immigrated to the United States after the death of her parents, according to her daughter, Mary Gardner Doran. Mrs. Allan, the third of eight children, came to the United States in search of better job opportunities. She settled on the Main Line, where she worked as a maid to help support a younger sister and four younger brothers in Scotland.
NEWS
December 9, 1990 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
When jazz bagpiper Rufus Harley swung into the traditional version of "Scotland the Brave," 200 Miquon school students, teachers and parents clapped vigorously to the beat. But several measures later, Harley bent the melody and the rhythm, turning the rousing Scottish march into "Scotland the Brave With Blues. " The audience lost the beat but not its fascination with a man who for nearly 30 years has combined the music of two seemingly disparate cultures. "Once you get into culture, you are talking about the marriage of everybody on the planet," said Harley, 54, of Germantown.
SPORTS
September 4, 2011 | The Inquirer Staff
Michal Kadlec's 90th-minute penalty kick for the Czech Republic salvaged a controversial 2-2 draw Saturday against Scotland in Glasgow in a 2012 European Championship qualifier. Scotland had led twice, with Kenny Miller scoring just before halftime and setting up Darren Fletcher's 83d-minute strike after Jaroslav Plasil had equalized for the visitors. But Kadlec blasted the spot kick into the net after Jan Rezek went down lightly under a Danny Wilson challenge. There was still time for the Scots to have a penalty appeal of their own turned down when Christophe Berra was instead booked for diving.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1993 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Great Garden at Pitmedden slowly appears as ocean mist rises from the rolling green banks of Aberdeenshire. Elsewhere on the landscape, wrought-iron gates reveal the enchanting Castle Garden of Crathes. Lines from Robert Burns' poetry? Not quite. It's the Philadelphia Flower Show, which takes this year's theme from Scotland for its annual floral extravaganza, to come into full bloom March 7 to 14 at the Philadelphia Civic Center. Besides viewing the hundreds of competitive displays by area nurseries, horticultural organizations and amateur gardeners, visitors can get gardening advice from the pros, watch demonstrations and purchase nearly everything related to gardening, from Victorian birdbaths to bonsai.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2015
SMOKED HADDOCK BRANDADE 2 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes 1 pound smoked haddock*, cut into 2-inch pieces 2/3 cup whole milk 1/3 cup olive oil 2 cloves whole garlic 1 bay leaf Salt and pepper to taste Peel and large-dice the potatoes, then place with bay leaf in cold water, just one inch over the top of the potatoes. Bring to a boil and turn the flame down to a medium-high heat. Cook until the potatoes are fully cooked, about 10 to 15 minutes. In a different pot, cook the smoked haddock in the milk until the fish breaks down, about 10 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2015
THANKS TO this past fall's widely debated independence vote, as well as poppy entry points like the hit Starz series "Outlander," talk of Scotland has been rolling off plenty of American tongues in recent months. And it's never long before the talk turns to food. Scotland's reputation in this department stinks. It's battered and deep-fried candy bars, at its most flattering; the dreaded haggis, at its least. Such characterizations, of course, are more cockamamie than cock-a-leekie soup without the prunes.
TRAVEL
December 15, 2014 | By Jamie Kirkpatrick, For The Inquirer
  EDINBURGH, Scotland - I was only 12 when I saw my first Scottish castle. It was the final night of the Edinburgh Festival and my parents marched me up the Mound to attend the Tattoo, a spectacle of military bands just outside the walls of the magnificent castle dominating the skyline of Scotland's capital. The queen arrived in a horse-drawn carriage, there were pipers and drummers galore, and at the end of the bedazzling performance, a lone piper played from the ramparts of the towering castle.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2014 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there When American University of Antigua held its 2010 orientation for new veterinary students, Stephanie had been on the island for a week, and had already bonded with everyone in her dorm building. But here were the other, yet-to-be-met classmates, who lived in the other dorm. Seemed like a good time to say hello! "She was the first one from the other group to introduce herself to us," John remembers. "She has this liveliness. This personality. And an unusual voice - it drew me to her right away.
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
They've got North Sea oil. They've got silky Scotch. Now, many are demanding free-e-e-e-dom ! Ken Kirkwood, a retired civil engineer who has lived in Haddonfield since 1976, is unequivocal: If he lived in his native Scotland he would vote a resounding "yes" to disaffiliate from the United Kingdom in Thursday's too-close-to-call referendum. "The battle for independence has been going on for 700 years. It's not new," Kirkwood said. "They should go for it. " In local pubs such as Cavanaugh's in Philadelphia, and King's Corner, in Jenkintown, where Scots congregate to watch soccer matches, and among the 450 members of the St. Andrew's Society of Philadelphia - which was founded in 1747 to aid indigent Scottish immigrants and today gives out college scholarships - the topic of Scottish separatism is hotter than a haggis out of the oven.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2014 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Spring semester of sophomore year at La Salle, Janette and two friends wanted adventure, but needed major-appropriate credits. Searching led to Scotland's University of Glasgow, where Janette could do work for an English/Spanish major with a minor in Japanese. One January night in 2006, firmly focused on the adventure part, Janette, Christina, and Amanda whooped it up at the Garage, one of the biggest dance clubs in the city. Fraser was at the bar when he saw his friend Martin talking to them and walked over.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
US Airways Group Inc. announced Monday new nonstop daily flights between Philadelphia and Scotland's capital city of Edinburgh, beginning in May. When the service begins May 23, Philadelphia's dominant airline, which transports more than 70 percent of air travelers who use the airport, will fly to 19 trans-Atlantic destinations from Philadelphia International Airport. The Edinburgh flights will be seasonal, between May 23 and Oct. 1, 2014. The airline will operate 176-seat Boeing 757 aircraft.
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
US Airways Group Inc. announced Monday new nonstop daily flights between Philadelphia and Scotland's capital city of Edinburgh, beginning in May. When the service begins May 23, Philadelphia's dominant airline, which transports more than 70 percent of air travelers who use the airport, will fly to 19 trans-Atlantic destinations from Philadelphia International Airport. The Edinburgh flights will be seasonal, between May 23 and Oct. 1, 2014. The airline will operate 176-seat Boeing 757 aircraft.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano and David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS), which was bailed out and is still owned mostly by British taxpayers, said Friday it would "accelerate" the sale of its U.S. banking subsidiary, which includes Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania. Citizens has 159 branches in Philadelphia and its four suburban Pennsylvania counties, more than any other bank in the region. RBS said in a statement that it was planning a "partial initial public offering" of Citizens Financial Group for 2014 and "intends to fully divest the business by the end of 2016.
TRAVEL
August 26, 2013 | By Kate Wunner, For The Inquirer
With a newly diagnosed gluten allergy, I had no idea how I would manage on a gluten-free diet during a recent visit to Scotland. While Edinburgh and Glasgow have fine restaurants and a vibrant ethnic food scene, tourists traveling north often have to rely on the familiar comfort foods. But fish and chips, meat pies, and scones were no longer an option for me. Surprisingly, this proved to be no hardship. Scotland has embraced gluten-free dining with a capital GF. Our first surprise was being welcomed at the home of friends with hot, buttered GF toast.
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