CollectionsScrabble
IN THE NEWS

Scrabble

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 27, 1988 | By Curtis Rist, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it comes to Scrabble, English is not always a pretty sight. It's not even a recognizable one. Take the word qoph, for instance. For poets, its use is limited: Few odes are written to the 19th letter of the Hebrew alphabet. But for Scrabble players, it's manna from heaven. After all, just how many U-less Q words are there? Buried within the language - and unearthed with 10-pound dictionaries - are abominable-sounding words such as xysti and ixia and aalii. Scrabble enthusiasts have set about rooting them out and bringing them to light on a board that has 225 spaces for wooden tiles.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Once again, I awoke under the table. When you buy a gardener's cottage that sits deep in the woods on a purling creek, you don't fast-forward 24 years and think what that house would be like during a hurricane for the ages. Those shady trees become howling missiles. Small appliances jet by in that whitewater creek. So after the electricity went out the second time Monday - after the Scrabble by candlelight, the gas-cooked spaghetti alla carbonara and the growler of South Philly IPA - we staked places to sleep on the first floor as Sandy's unblinking eye headed our way. One son made his bunk in the den. The other flopped on a nearby couch.
NEWS
June 17, 1999 | By Kristen A. Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sam Fala's killer Scrabble strategy is simple: "I go for score," said Fala, 69, of Media. "The right tiles in the right places. " Fala parlayed his plan into a second straight Scrabble championship yesterday in the Delaware County Senior Games, prevailing over Loretta Guy, 60, of Darby Borough. The games, which opened Monday and end tomorrow, consist of such athletic events as golf, swimming and bowling, as well as parlor games such as pinochle and Scrabble. Organizers say the competitions celebrate the skill and spirit of the area's older citizens.
NEWS
March 26, 2000 | By Froma Harrop
It was with a small jolt that I scanned the list of top 10 grossing movies for 1999, and realized that I hadn't seen one of them. That is one reason why tonight, the night of the 72nd annual Academy Awards, I will be playing Scrabble. I don't know how many Americans will be playing Scrabble tonight, but I do know that a lot of you will not be focused on the doings in Hollywood. Last year's Academy Awards show drew about 10 million fewer viewers than the year before. This year, it will probably lose more, and definitely me. That said, this is not an I-hate-Hollywood screed.
NEWS
September 15, 1994 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Albert "Billy" Jerry came to play Scrabble. Soon, the word games grew into a brief romantic relationship with his opponent. But after the woman broke off the relationship, prosecutors say, Jerry came back to her home for a relationship of a different kind - with her 15-year-old daughter. Yesterday, a Superior Court jury convicted the 40-year-old Jerry of seven counts of sexual assault and one count of criminal sexual contact. Jerry, formerly of Willingboro but now serving time in New York for burglary, could be sentenced to as much as 30 years in prison.
NEWS
February 12, 2008 | By Frank Visco INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Annette Jeffrey clicks the orange button on the lower right of the computer screen, shuffling the tiles in her vowel-plagued rack. Her sister, Beth, who lives in Seattle, is beating her 77-38, but Jeffrey has just noticed an opportunity for a three-word score that could put her back in the game. Jeffrey is playing Scrabulous, an Internet version of Scrabble that has been burning up the social-networking site Facebook. There, according to numbers visible online, the game draws more than 610,000 players a day; an affiliated Scrabulous Web site (www.
NEWS
December 5, 2007 | By Kathy Stevenson
Winter is here, and suddenly family members are spending more time indoors together. Dancing With the Stars is over and American Idol hasn't begun yet. What to do with all that leisure time? I reach for the Scrabble game. As I do so, I find myself thinking back on the thousands of Scrabble games I have played over the years, and realize that I have learned much more from the game than just words that start with q that don't need a u (qat, qaid, qoph). Or new words that might not seem like words (bork, jink, zax)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2006 | By Brooke Honeyford FOR THE INQUIRER
From baroque to the big screen, the Lenape Chamber Ensemble and the Curtis Institute of Music have designed unusual presentations to introduce children ages 4 to 12 to the mechanics and magic of classical music this weekend. The elaborate melodies of Vivaldi, Handel, Pachelbel and other composers will fill the Delaware Valley College Student Center in Doylestown as the Lenape Chamber Ensemble performs classics from the baroque era. The ensemble members selected excerpts from their adult concert repertoire they thought children could recognize, and adapted their format to in-the-round to add intimacy between audience members and performers.
NEWS
June 28, 2010
Karen Marie Dohm, 58, of Havertown, an anthropologist and educator, died of cancer Saturday, June 5, at Dunwoody Care Center in Newtown Square. Dr. Dohm was coordinator of master's programs in basic sciences at Thomas Jefferson University from 1997 until illness forced her to retire in 2006. She also taught anthropology and scientific writing at Jefferson. Dr. Dohm grew up in Pittsburgh and Miami and earned a bachelor's degree in anthropology from the University of Florida. While earning a master's degree and doctorate in anthropology from Washington State University, she conducted archaeological research on the origins of pre-Anasazi cultures in Utah and Colorado.
NEWS
June 7, 1995 | By Jeff Gelles, with reports from Inquirer wire services
'HOME OF THE O.J. TRIAL' HAD LIMITED STAYING POWER It's not snazzy. It doesn't rhyme. And it doesn't say anything about kicking tail. But Los Angeles County thinks its new slogan - chosen over such suggestions as "You Can Shake Us But You Can't Break Us," "Floods, Fire and Fun" and "L.A.: Come Sequester Yourself" - will improve its tarnished image. The county's choice: "Together, we're the best. Los Angeles. " The phrase will be presented today with billboards, celebrity TV and radio commercials and a jingle.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Sarah Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cheri Cutler and her 6-year-old son, Jacob Weisgold, have a routine: Every morning, Jacob gleefully tells his mom by how many points he's beating her friends in Words With Friends. Jacob, a kindergartner at St. Peter's School, started playing Words With Friends, a digital adaptation of Scrabble, when he was 5, looking over Cutler's shoulder and taking her phone. At first, Cutler didn't think much of it - he was just a little boy who wanted to spend time with his mom. "Then he started taking my phone and making words bigger than I could make," she said.
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Jill Rachel Jacobs
As night fell on the eve of the return to Eastern Standard Time, the power was restored in lower Manhattan to thousands of apartments, including mine. Neighborhood by neighborhood, streetlamp by streetlamp, amid cheers and hallelujahs, a sense of relief began to ensue as the blinding blackness lifted, and the unseasonably chilly autumnal air that filled our homes these last days was replaced by a familiar warmth and comfort. Just as quickly as I had become one of the "have-nots," the unfortunates living below 40th Street post-Sandy, I was thrust back into my former status as one of the "haves," those once more living with the basics: heat, water, flushing toilets, electricity.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Once again, I awoke under the table. When you buy a gardener's cottage that sits deep in the woods on a purling creek, you don't fast-forward 24 years and think what that house would be like during a hurricane for the ages. Those shady trees become howling missiles. Small appliances jet by in that whitewater creek. So after the electricity went out the second time Monday - after the Scrabble by candlelight, the gas-cooked spaghetti alla carbonara and the growler of South Philly IPA - we staked places to sleep on the first floor as Sandy's unblinking eye headed our way. One son made his bunk in the den. The other flopped on a nearby couch.
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER COLUMNIST
Once again I awoke under the table. When you buy a gardener's cottage that sits deep in the woods on a purling creek, you don't fast-forward 24 years and think what that house would be like during a hurricane for the ages. Those shady trees become howling missiles. Small appliances jet by in that white-water creek. So after the electricity went out the second time Monday, after the Scrabble by candlelight and the growler of South Philly IPA, we staked places to sleep on the first floor as Sandy's unblinking eye headed our way. One son made his bunk in the den. The other flopped on a nearby couch.
NEWS
August 15, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ORLANDO, FLA. - One of the top young Scrabble players in the country has been kicked out of the game's national championship tournament in Florida after being caught hiding blank letter tiles, organizers said Tuesday. John D. Williams, Jr., executive director of the National Scrabble Association, said that a male player was ejected from the 350-player event in Round 24 of the 28-round event. The cheating was spotted by a player at a nearby table, who noticed the ejected player conceal a pair of blank tiles by dropping them on the floor, organizers said.
NEWS
March 18, 2012 | By Kevin Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Green was in prison when he got the word - eight letters spelling S-c-r-a-b-b-l-e that he says helped him turn his life around. "Robbery, burglary, I was no good as a kid," said Green, who spent 24 of his 51 years behind bars. But prison changed all that. While incarcerated, the Philadelphia native learned how to play Scrabble and how to dominate other players in the game. He spent so much time playing it that when he left prison, his family encouraged him to join the National Scrabble Association.
NEWS
January 25, 2012
Cheating to win is fun in video and social games. Many smartphone applications offer "cheats" for solving word games and the like. Your fake prowess will amaze friends - or enrage them. There's no better way to prove the grudging acceptability of a little cheating than to see the profusion of "cheats" apps in the Android Market and App Store. Cheats for The Sims, for Call of Duty, for Farmville. An app called Ultimate Cheats , by Digital Hot Sauce, is $1.99 for iPhone in the App Store.
NEWS
January 6, 2012
TELL ME, which Rick Santorum do you hate? The one who compared sodomy to bestiality, thereby insulting the type of people who engage in either - or both? (Not to mention the folks at PETA.) Or the one who believes that the unborn are more than just disposable masses of protoplasm and deserve the same respect that you'd give to any other creature of God? Or, speaking of God, the one who thinks that purging any vestige of religion from the public square is an intentional misreading of the Establishment Clause, one that wouldn't even pass muster with the Warren Court?
NEWS
April 21, 2011
WHEN JOHN GREEN was hired to be a photographer for Fan Foto in 2007, he had never held a camera in his hands. Zoom forward four years, and he's among the best in the firm, which contracts to take photographs of fans at sporting venues such as Citizens Bank Park. Fan Foto is owned by SharpShooter Imaging. Advance to two weeks ago, and the 50-year-old Green is fired just after the start of the baseball season because a background check showed he's an ex-con. Green, stunned and hurt, says he disclosed his status during his job interview with Fan Foto.
NEWS
December 28, 2010
IF YOUR FAMILY is anything like mine, they could be found the day after Christmas working their thumbs. That is, they probably spent the day hunched over a five-inch screen on the latest electronic game or gadget in their collection of virtual realities. I almost sat on my youngest granddaughter, who was on the sofa curled up under a blanket. She was blotting out the light around her to create a sharper contrast for her digital screen. Fortunately, her parents insist that she spend an hour or so reading every day. So she keeps her e-reader just outside the blanket in case her mother or father get medieval on her and enforce their reading rule.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|