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Scrapple

BUSINESS
September 17, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Habbersett has scrapped plans to move into South Philadelphia, deciding to remain in Media and expand its scrapple and pork products facility where it has been headquartered for more than 140 years. Habbersett had reportedly been ready to move to Wisconsin, home of its new parent company, Johnsonville Sausage, although Johnsonville chairman Ralph Stayer said yesterday that such a move was never really considered seriously. What was weighed seriously was a move to the former Real Steak plant in the 3300 block of South Front Street, near the Food Distribution Center in South Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1994 | by Patricia Commins, Reuters Daily News staff writers Li Wang and Bill Wedo contributed to this report
Spam keeps bringing home the bacon. The food product carried by GIs at D-Day is today experiencing double-digit growth, according to Hormel, the company based in Austin, Minn., that packs it. America's best-known canned meat, whose name comes from "spiced pork and ham," is still marching to destinations around the world. But if Spam has survived as a staple for millions of Americans since being introduced in 1937, the "Miracle Meat" had its best years in the 1950s and 1960s.
SPORTS
October 8, 1993 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Tim McCarver heard the complainers yesterday on WIP-AM. The callers thought McCarver and play-by-play man Sean McDonough were anti-Phillies during CBS's telecast of Game 1 of the National League Championship Series. McCarver laughed yesterday, as I did. Were these people watching the same game I was, the game the Phillies won, 4-3, in 10 innings? "I did an article for the Atlanta Constitution (Wednesday) night before the game about anti-Atlanta (sentiments)," McCarver said, pausing in his detailed preparation for Game 2 in the CBS broadcast booth at Veterans Stadium.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1986 | By Francis Davis, Special to The Inquirer
I'll never forget the time, about 10 years ago, that I heard vibist Milt Jackson at a nightclub in West Philadelphia. Though burdened with an incompatible local rhythm section, he was masterful on a series of flavorsome ballads and sauntering blues. But that wasn't good enough for one of the patrons, a drunk at the bar who pleaded, "Play 'Scrapple From the Apple,' Milt," after every number. Jackson finally decided that he could take no more of it. Glaring at the man, he ripped off a version of the requested Charlie Parker line at a furious tempo that blurred its contours into something more abstract.
NEWS
June 21, 2012 | By Drew Lazor, For The Inquirer
In the early-morning hours of June 13, six Philadelphia chefs began filling their trunks with meticulously organized containers and coolers, each vessel stocked with the raw materials necessary to execute an elaborate, $170-a-seat dinner at New York's James Beard House. One unmistakable foodstuff, however, had been fully prepared ahead of time. "We wanted to bring a little Philly up with us," said the event's organizer, Mémé's David Katz. "So we brought scrapple. " This was no processed slab of gray, store-bought mush.
NEWS
October 15, 1993
By the end, they were doing the Philly chop, elbows bending a bit vengefully in the echoing, joyous, eye-rubbing rows of the Vet. Not only had these Phillies not collapsed. They'd brought a scrappy, disheveled dignity to a National League pennant win, silencing that dopey chatter on CBS about how scrapple is made, putting a whole new, beautiful spin on October in Philadelphia. Pardon the sports-as-metaphor-for-municipal-life bit. But there has seemed something appropriate about these 1993 Phils, these castoffs, underdogs, Rodney Dangerfields, climbing out of last year's basement to this year's pinnacle (almost)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1986 | By JIM KNIGHT, Daily News Staff Writer
Scrapple, euphemistically known in some quarters as "Philadelphia Pate," has taken a pasting for years. True, you don't drink champagne with this scrappy little pate, and it's only finger food if you eat it in a sandwich. Ken Finkle of the Library Company of Philadelphia and Glen Bergman of the Commissary are going to put all the scraps on Philadelphia scrapple into historical perspective with a program at 5:30 p.m. explaining its history and lore. This workshop on a local staple is part of an ongoing series presented by the Library Company and the Historical Society in conjunction with its new exhibit, "The Larder Invaded: Three Centuries of Philadelphia Food and Drink.
NEWS
August 25, 1988 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Rack roast of lamb, smothered in carrots and potatoes, will be the bill of fare when Mary Pat Young cooks the championship Shropshire lamb that her son Chris helped raise for the Delaware County 4-H Club in Upper Providence. Young and her husband, Warren, purchased the 129-pound lamb Saturday for $145 at the 4-H Club's summer fair and auction at Rose Tree Park. The lamb will be butchered, wrapped and ready for the freezer on Wednesday. Fifteen-year-old Chris Young, of Clifton Heights, said he prepared himself for the lamb's sale and slaughter but admitted, "I'll feel a little weird eating him. " Bryan Haskins of Aston - who sold his 108-pound lamb, Fats, for $113 - and Barbie Hannig of Broomall - whose 247-pound pig, Scrapple, sold for $345 - were a bit more emotional.
FOOD
April 8, 2010 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the Phillies' seventh season at Citizens Bank Park, concessionaire Aramark wanted to throw a little change-up in the hot dog routine. Not that hot dogs are unpopular. Last season, Aramark sold 1,314,223 hot dogs at the ballpark. The Center City-based food giant wanted to create a signature variety for its home team - something memorable, something that says Philadelphia and baseball . Aramark decided that the meaty matter would be put to a fan vote. Three choices were unveiled online last month, and all were sampled at the ballpark during last week's two preseason games.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Part of the list is runovers, unfinished business, cryptic notes to self: A fireside dinner at the Carversville Inn once again seems like the venue for good winter material; and has for about three years running. Its problem is that something always jumps the line in that neck of Bucks County (up toward New Hope) - a gorgeous lavender farm where they're making their own honey, or Solebury Orchard in cider season, or the homespun pork and oyster dinner they've been holding at the Carversville Christian Church since 1871.
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