CollectionsScraps
IN THE NEWS

Scraps

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 15, 1991 | by Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writer
This, you should know right off, is about wallpaper scraps. Old, colonial, very quaint wallpaper scraps, including a particularly historic specimen that was scraped from behind a baseboard in an old house in (where else?) Colonial Williamsburg. These tattered scraps of rag paper are not, old as they are, priceless. In fact, says the woman in charge of them, they're virtually worthless. Unless you happen to be attracted to 229-year-old wallpaper scraps, which Margaret Pritchard most definitely is. She said she was "really upset" yesterday because the quaint old wallpaper scraps are lost.
SPORTS
May 4, 2007 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Under fire from undergraduates, the Penn State athletic department bowed to students' wishes yesterday and scrapped a plan to distribute 21,800 football tickets by lottery. Penn State will return to the first-come, first-served policy. "It became very apparent, very quickly, that most Penn State students want the first-come, first-served system," associate athletic director Greg Myford said. "So that's what we are going to do. " With a capacity of 107,282, Beaver Stadium is the second-largest in the country behind Michigan Stadium (107,501)
SPORTS
October 29, 1998 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
At one end of this bizarre spectrum, Michael Jordan is facing down the NBA owners with the same steely-eyed, take-no-prisoners approach he adopts when he plays poker with teammates or when he taunts an Allen Iverson on the court. At the opposite end, fans outside the New York Sheraton calling themselves the Fans Union, wearing T-shirts inscribed "Sports Apocalypse Is Coming," ring bells and ask for donations of food and money to help feed the hungry, underpaid players, who were paid an average of $2.6 million last season.
SPORTS
December 11, 2012 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
The NHL on Monday canceled games through Dec. 30, meaning nearly 43 percent of the regular season has been scrapped because of the lockout. Before Monday, games had been canceled through Dec. 14. The NHL and the players union are expected to meet later this week, trying to end a labor dispute that started in mid-September. The sides have had informal talks since negotiations broke off on Thursday. The dispute is conjuring memories of the 1994-95 season, when the league and its players did not forge a collective bargaining agreement until Jan. 11. That year, a 48-game season started Jan. 20 and ended May 3. Monday was the 86th day of the lockout.
NEWS
September 17, 2009 | By Edward Colimore and Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
For nearly 40 years, it's been one of the Jersey Shore's oddities: the boardwalk without boards. Ventnor experimented with aluminum planks along a two-block section in 1972 as a way to hold down costs. The aluminum stood up better to the elements than wood did. But the idea never caught on with residents or visitors. Many slipped on the metal as they walked, jogged, or rode bikes, especially after rain or fog. No more. Ventnor is returning to an old-fashioned, all-wooden boardwalk and saying good riddance to the aluminum section.
NEWS
January 6, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Facing strong community opposition, the Philadelphia Housing Authority has scrapped plans to build new homes atop a former 18th century burial ground for African Americans that now lies beneath a soon-to-be-demolished apartment complex in the Germantown section. At a sometimes raucous meeting with about 150 community members and others Thursday night, Michael Johns, PHA's general manager for community development and design, announced - to the surprise of many - that the authority had dropped plans to build more than 50 homes on the site of the former Germantown Potter's Field.
NEWS
February 12, 1998 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Other people may recycle cans, bottles and newspapers. The children of Overbrook Educational Center reuse fabric. The students made quilts from scraps of pillows, T-shirts and baby blankets pulled from the bottom of drawers and closets in their homes. The quilts taught them that anything, no mattered how tattered, could gain new purpose and meaning. "We recycled to carry on the memories," said Bahiyah Abdul Malik, a sixth grader at the Philadelphia public school, at Lansdowne Avenue and 68th Street.
SPORTS
October 12, 1997 | By Marc Narducci, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bucky Mitchell likes to call his Lenape football players "fighters. " Individually, the team doesn't have players who will be among the statistical leaders in South Jersey. But collectively, they scrap and claw with the best of them. Yesterday the Indians delivered a knockout punch by hammering rival Cherokee, 28-6, in an Olympic Conference American Division game. Lenape is 2-1, 2-0 in the American Division. Cherokee, ranked No. 8 in South Jersey by The Inquirer, fell to 2-2, 1-1. "We may not have that big Division I player, but my kids are battlers," Mitchell said.
NEWS
December 12, 1996 | For The Inquirer / CLIFF MAUTNER
The former Kings Shopping Center in Edgewater Park is being demolished. Thomas Matthews and Kevin Ferguson hauled scraps yesterday.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | BY SUSAN SELASKY, Tribune News Service
IF YOU'RE growing your own or getting produce through a CSA, you've probably got the whole vegetable to consider. Using it all can yield more value and variation. Not only are stalks, stems and leaves tasty, but some have entirely different flavors than their more popular parts. Broccoli stalks are sweeter than their florets. Feathery carrot tops taste like herbs and can be used as such. Beet greens mellow when sauteed; raw, they can add a peppery flavor to salads. To gather the makings of a great vegetable stock, keep a plastic bag in the freezer to add vegetable scraps or unused pieces (broccoli stalks, onion pieces, carrots, celery ribs and leaves)
NEWS
May 23, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sen. Pat Toomey has taken his defense of police to the White House. After delivering an unannounced, pro-police speech on the Senate floor two weeks ago, the Pennsylvania Republican on Thursday sent a letter to President Obama calling for an end to the newly announced ban on transferring military-grade weapons to local police departments - and saying that the task force which recommended the change had made "insulting" assumptions about police....
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
SAYREVILLE, N.J. - Sayreville's mayor and Borough Council members Tuesday night defended a decision by the school district superintendent to abolish the high school football season because of a hazing scandal that has caught nationwide attention. "I thought Dr. Labbe did a courageous thing," Mayor Kennedy O'Brien said at the council meeting, referring to Superintendent Richard Labbe. "It took true strength of character. " He said it was time for Sayreville, a Middlesex County community of about 40,000 people southwest of New York City, to begin healing.
SPORTS
October 9, 2014 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Florida reserve quarterback Skyler Mornhinweg and teammate Gerald Willis got into a fight over a pair of missing cleats Monday night, according to the university's police department. He is a former St. Joseph's Prep star and the son of New York Jets offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg. Mornhinweg suffered "small lacerations on his lower lip" and was taken to a nearby hospital for treatment, according to the police report. Willis had a "small cut on his chin" but did not get medical attention.
NEWS
July 1, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dania Sargenc often joked that the neon sign above Benash Liquor Store, with its bold yellow lettering, rusty red background, and arrow pointing toward the door, would one day be hers. The sign went up in 1948, when her uncle opened the store along Route 38 in Cherry Hill. Soon her father worked there, and even through ownership changes during the next 66 years, the sign remained. Then, last week, it came crashing down. What was one man's misfortune - accidentally toppling the sign with a red pickup truck - was Sargenc's chance to reclaim a part of her family's history.
NEWS
April 5, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia Streets Department worker and a School District employee have been caught on surveillance video hauling scrap metal from their jobs and selling it to recyclers, officials said Thursday. The video shows the streets worker using a forklift to put large items such as guardrails and storage containers into a trailer attached to his pickup truck, City Controller Alan Butkovitz said at a news conference at the Municipal Services Building. The employees were not identified.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
TWO CITY workers caught on tape stealing scrap metal from city-owned property and hawking it for cash may be facing criminal charges. City Controller Alan Butkovitz released the findings yesterday of an investigation into two public employees - one a school district locksmith and the other a Streets Department worker - caught taking scrap metal from city property and selling it to private recyclers. The controller declined to identify the two men, but said they still have their jobs.
FOOD
January 17, 2014 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
In the world of cooking, one chef's throwaways are the makings of another's sauce. This is especially true of vegetables, where tradition has guided what can sometimes seem like the arbitrary rules of keep and discard. "When you think about it, the first person to figure out how to eat an artichoke was a genius," says Michael Santoro, chef-owner of the Mildred in Bella Vista. "People were probably walking past those things for a while, and it took someone to look beyond that tough woody part to get what was inside.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
After months of trying to fix broken escalators at commuter train stations in Center City and South Jersey, PATCO may demolish and replace some of the equipment. That process could take nine months or more. PATCO riders have been dealing with broken escalators and elevators since July, when transit agency officials let a maintenance contract lapse. An emergency plea to SEPTA for help, apologies from the PATCO board, and a new maintenance contract have brought only marginal relief to many riders.
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Navy has paid 1 cent to have the USS Forrestal, the first of the United States' supercarriers, towed from its berth in Philadelphia to Texas to be scrapped. The Navy said Tuesday it awarded what is called a procurement contract to All Star Metals of Brownsville. All Star Metals is expected to tow the 1,067-foot carrier from its berth at the Navy's Inactive Ship Facility in Philadelphia to Brownsville before the end of the year, the Navy said. Christopher Johnson, a spokesman for the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|