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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
An insipid success fantasy for aspiring scriptwriters, Just Write stars Jeremy Piven as a tour guide mistaken for a hot screenwriter by a comely starlet (Sherilynn Fenn) who has him rewrite her movie romance with Brad Pitt. Along the way, fraud and fraulein fall in love. This has all the plausibility of a Mr. Softee vendor winning the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award and the hand of Michelle Pfeiffer. However preposterous the premise, it is always a pleasure to see Piven, the TV star (Ellen, Cupid)
NEWS
March 24, 2012
Tonino Guerra, 92, an Italian screenwriter and poet whose film collaborators, including Michelangelo Antonioni, Federico Fellini, Andrei Tarkovsky and Theo Angelopoulos, amounted to a who's who of European cinema's golden age, died Wednesday at his home in Santarcangelo di Romagna. In a screenwriting career covering a half-century, Mr. Guerra earned three Academy Award nominations and had a long partnership with Antonioni. Their first collaboration, the enigmatic L'Avventura (1960)
NEWS
September 12, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Catherine Turney, 92, the screenwriter who created the definitive roles for actresses such as Joan Crawford, Ida Lupino and Barbara Stanwyck, died Wednesday at her home in Sierra Madre, Calif. Ms. Turney specialized in Women Who Love Too Much, but unlike her male counterparts, she left her heroines their dignity. She wrote the screenplay for Mildred Pierce (1945), for which Joan Crawford won an Oscar as the sacrificing mother who tries to buy her daughter's love. For Lupino, Ms. Turney wrote the startlingly modern The Man I Love (1946)
NEWS
February 17, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Burt Kennedy, the screenwriter whose ticklish words revived the flagging fortunes of John Wayne, Randolph Scott and the Hollywood western, died of cancer Thursday at his home in Los Angeles. He was 78. A child vaudevillian and failed actor who liked to joke that he was "a has-been at the age of 7," Mr. Kennedy was an Army hero during World War II, winning the Silver Star, Bronze Star and Purple Heart. He studied acting under the GI Bill but found employment as a writer, first for radio and then with Wayne's company, Batjac Productions.
NEWS
June 25, 2011
David Rayfiel, 87, a screenwriter and script doctor who made his mark, often uncredited, on films by director Sydney Pollack that frequently featured Robert Redford, including Three Days of the Condor, The Way We Were, and Out of Africa, died Wednesday in New York City of congestive heart failure. The collaboration between Pollack and Mr. Rayfiel began in the early 1960s, endured for more than 40 years, and encompassed at least 15 films. When Out of Africa (1985)
NEWS
March 6, 1993 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul D. Zimmerman, 54, a Bucks County screenwriter and peace activist who won fleeting notoriety at the 1984 Republican National Convention for being one of only two delegates not to vote for the renomination of Ronald Reagan, died Tuesday at the Medical Center at Princeton. At the convention, Mr. Zimmerman said he withheld his vote because he was denied an opportunity to talk about an issue dear to his heart - a nuclear freeze. "I just wanted to make my case to the delegates in an open caucus or a regional platform hearing," he said at the time.
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Howard Gensler, Staff Writer
The magnet on the refrigerator was a saying from football coach Bill Parcells that hung in quarterback Phil Simms' locker: "Blame nobody. Expect nothing. Do something. " Brad Furman's mother put it up when Brad was a boy growing up in Lafayette Hill, 35 minutes from Center City. Both have taken it to heart. Furman, who graduated from Friends' Central School, decided early on he wanted to be in the movie business, moved to L.A., and, through force of determination, made it happen.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2004 | New York Daily News
Joe Eszterhas became Hollywood's highest-paid and most infamous screenwriter with such controversial movies as "Basic Instinct" and "Showgirls. " Now, in "Hollywood Animal" - his explosive tell-all new book - Eszterhas reveals many of the secrets of those days when he was a poster boy for sex and violence and depravity in movies. He also tells how he finally left Los Angeles for his hometown in Ohio, where he fought a life-or-death battle with cancer. He's a changed man, Eszterhas said in an interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1989 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
Screenwriters are usually the last humans on earth you want to see when you're making a movie. Their job is done - they wrote the thing, right? And if they're hanging around they'll just get in the way: blubbering pathetically as actors improvise over those carefully crafted lines, throwing tantrums when the director deems whole pages of script suddenly without merit. Which is why the presence of Tom Schulman on the Delaware set of Dead Poets Society last year was, in itself, remarkable.
LIVING
December 6, 1998 | By John Woestendiek, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So he's a little old, a tad bald, a bit roly-poly. It's not as if he's the newest washboard-abbed, sparkly-toothed hunk on Melrose Place. He's a writer. And as such, you'd think, as he does, that - in an occupation where wisdom and experience are supposed to count for something - his age would either: (a) not matter, or (b) work to his benefit. But no. This is Hollywood, where youth, it seems, is everything - even in a world of 49-year-old prizefighters and a 77-year-old astronaut.
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NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Howard Gensler, Staff Writer
The magnet on the refrigerator was a saying from football coach Bill Parcells that hung in quarterback Phil Simms' locker: "Blame nobody. Expect nothing. Do something. " Brad Furman's mother put it up when Brad was a boy growing up in Lafayette Hill, 35 minutes from Center City. Both have taken it to heart. Furman, who graduated from Friends' Central School, decided early on he wanted to be in the movie business, moved to L.A., and, through force of determination, made it happen.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2016 | By Charles McNulty, TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE
There was a time when we went to the movies to escape the workplace. These days, in keeping with the way our offices have taken over our lives, filmmakers have turned the big screen into one long career day. Audiences have been invited to experience firsthand the everyday grind of being a journalist ( Spotlight ), an astronaut ( The Martian ), a screenwriter ( Trumbo ), a fur trapper ( The Revenant ), and even an inventor of kitchen mops ( Joy ). Ever wonder what it was like to be a retail clerk in a fancy old New York department store?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2015 | Reprinted from earlier editions. By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Dalton Trumbo spent a lot of time in the bath. However, unlike most people who spend time in the bath, the industrious screenwriter wasn't lolling in dreamy requiescence, or blowing bubbles in the steamy mist. He was sitting upright in the water, puffing cigarettes, drinking booze, pumped on Benzedrine, and banging out page after page on a typewriter propped on a board. In Trumbo , the oddly jolly cautionary tale based on the true-life political and professional ostracism of one of Hollywood's most talented scribes, even a congressional committee's fiercest condemnation can't keep our hero from producing reams of dialogue and action, romance and intrigue, shootouts and space voyages.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2015 | BY JOSEPH SANTOLIQUITO, For the Daily News
WITHIN FIVE HOURS on the road, something wasn't right. The light-blue Oldsmobile Cutlass with the rusted holes through the wheel wells couldn't make it around a city block, let alone reach California, yet Brad Ingelsby and his cousin Bryan Paterson thought they could get one last ride out of the decrepit heap. It didn't take long for the car to begin huffing, puffing and lurching. Ohio was the first of many breakdowns by the side of the road. Another came in Joplin, Mo., tornado country, where Bonnie and Clyde once robbed banks.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Monday night, screenwriter Arash Amel gave Twitter a look inside something Hollywood rarely likes to talk about: what it feels like to be part of a disaster. Amel wrote the screenplay for the ill-fated Grace Kelly biopic Grace of Monaco . Those in the know already feel bad for Amel after reading that sentence. For those not: Grace of Monaco , starring Nicole Kidman and directed by La Vie en Rose 's Olivier Dahan, was scheduled for release in fall 2013 and meant for Oscar glory but didn't debut until the 2014 Cannes Film Festival, where it was booed.
NEWS
December 31, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
LARRY RICHETTE had a way of making lurid headlines. There was the time he was arrested for beating his mother, the late Common Pleas Judge Lisa A. Richette. He once flashed a woman TV reporter. There was an arrest for shoving a cop, breaking into Democratic headquarters in Washington and a couple of other altercations over the years. He became such a pariah in his South Philadelphia neighborhood that residents held a special town meeting in September 2010 to discuss what to do about him. But Larry also made a name for himself in cultural, political and literary circles as a journalist, novelist, playwright, screenwriter and political consultant.
NEWS
July 22, 2013
Vincenzo Cerami, 72, an Italian writer who coauthored the screenplay of Life Is Beautiful , died July 17 in Rome. His death was widely reported by Italian media. The cause could not immediately be confirmed. Life Is Beautiful , starring Roberto Benigni, who also directed, is an award-winning tragicomedy about a father's quest to save his son's life and innocence amid the horrors of a Nazi concentration camp. Mr. Cerami, a protege of Pier Paolo Pasolini, the writer and director, was a poet, novelist, and playwright who wrote or cowrote screenplays of more than 40 films.
NEWS
April 5, 2013
Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, 85, a German-born novelist whose fiction was set largely in India and who gained her greatest acclaim as a two-time Academy Award-winning screenwriter with the Merchant-Ivory filmmaking team, died Wednesday, April 3, at her home in New York City. She had a pulmonary disorder, said James Ivory, the film director who worked with Mrs. Jhabvala since the early 1960s. Producer Ismail Merchant, director Ivory, and Mrs. Jhabvala formed what would become one of the most enduring creative teams in moviemaking history.
NEWS
March 30, 2013
LOS ANGELES - Fay Kanin, 95, an Oscar-nominated screenwriter for the 1958 Clark Gable-Doris Day comedy Teacher's Pet and former president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, died Wednesday. In a career that spanned more than four decades, Mrs. Kanin penned screenplays for movies such as the 1954 Elizabeth Taylor romantic drama Rhapsody and television specials such as Tell Me Where It Hurts , for which she won two Emmy Awards in 1974. She won another Emmy in 1979 for producing Friendly Fire , a Carol Burnett TV movie based on the true story of an American soldier killed in the Vietnam War. Mrs. Kanin was president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences from 1979 to 1983, and was its second female president after actress Bette Davis.
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