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NEWS
August 14, 1992 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The need to have a hearty laugh is the only reason to see "Single White Female," another farcical comedy masquerading as a suspense thriller. The picture stars lanky Bridget Fonda as a young woman who kicks a cheating boyfriend out of her Manhattan apartment, advertises for a new roommate, and gets Jennifer Jason Leigh, a psycho in sheep's clothing. "Single White Female" is directed by the unbelievably sardonic Barbet Schroeder, who made a hero out of Claus Von Bulow in "Reversal of Fortune," while at the same time presaging the development of crusading defense lawyer Alan Dershowitz into an egomaniac.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
Jason Statham was on holiday, as he and his fellow Brits like to say, when he flipped open a script sent for his perusal. It was by Lewis John Carlino , it was about a cool hit man whose specialty was making his kills look like accidents - and it was cracking good. "I read it, and I loved it," Statham says of the screenplay, which was called The Mechanic - the same title as a 1972 action pic starring Charles Bronson . And as it turns out, he was reading the shooting script from the Bronson film.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1990 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Danny Glover came to Philadelphia yesterday to talk about his new picture, "To Sleep With Anger," but by evening, he'd had just about enough. Sprawled casually in the back of a limo, his painful shoes discarded and his bare feet resting on the floor, the actor was too tired after nine hours of interviews to talk about anything but football. The San Francisco-raised Glover was talking about his hometown 49ers, remembering fondly and pointedly the 49ers' comeback victory over the Philadelphia Eagles last season.
NEWS
May 21, 2012 | Steven Rea
One of the obvious differences between The Dictator, the new Sacha Baron Cohen comedy, and Borat and Bruno, his 2006 and 2009 endeavors, is that the latter two, of course, were real. That is, they presented themselves as documentary-like affairs, with Baron Cohen's Kazakh TV personality and Austrian fashion journalist, respectively, inserting themselves into real-life situations with real-life people. Unscripted. Let the fur fly. In The Dictator, Baron Cohen plays General Admiral Haffaz Aladeen, the ruler of a fictional North African republic.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Hit and Runway, a desperate, aspiring screenwriter dreams of penning a blockbuster action movie even though he has absolutely no discernible talent or qualifications. Given the prevailing standards in Hollywood, this should assure him a lifetime of work. But in Christopher Livingston's erratic comedy, which features a lot more misses than hits, Alex Andero, a Greenwich Village dishwasher, realizes his work is terrible. This kind of honest self-appraisal would in real life ruin his chances of a three-picture deal with Jerry Bruckheimer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1996 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The film opens with Howard Stern - suspended over the stage, his buttocks bare - wondering whether he's doing the right thing as he prepares for his infamous entrance at the 1992 MTV Video Music Awards. It ends in a dream sequence, with Stern, in the same get-up, suspended over the stage at the Oscars, about to receive an Academy Award. "God . . . What a dream," Stern, now awake, says to wife Alison. "Good or bad?" "I don't know," says the exasperated jock who, in his dream, has just splattered onto the stage.
NEWS
September 1, 2008 | By Howard Shapiro, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seems like every year, at least one Fringe musical explores - or maybe exploits - the trials of an aspiring singer who looks for fame and love against all odds. Trite? You bet, but when it's good it connects. The Hoppers Hit the Road, about two singing brothers on a quest for the big time, is composed of a cast of Philadelphia improv actors who decided it would be fun to use a script. And it's good. If it can smooth out rough edges during this run, it will be better than that.
NEWS
February 13, 2003 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Arturo Brachetti appears before our eyes as a horseman, or possibly a royal mounted cop. Then he ducks behind a scrim. Poing! In a split second - not a full second, mind you - he's before us again, this time in full bumblebee getup. He disappears for an instant once more, then . . . He's back. As a sort of cartoon flower, in full splendor, pistils and stamens blushing in the stage lights. The talented Brachetti is a quick-change artist, and in his native Italy, he is a big star.
NEWS
September 2, 2008 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seems like every year, at least one Fringe musical explores - or maybe exploits - the trials of an aspiring singer who looks for fame and love against all odds. Trite? You bet, but when it's good it connects. The Hoppers Hit the Road, about two singing brothers on a quest for the big time, is composed of a cast of Philadelphia improv actors who decided it would be fun to use a script. And it's good. If it can smooth out rough edges during this run, it will be better than that. Hoppers is classic Fringe, done with joy and a sense that everyone, audience included, is a conspirator.
SPORTS
November 2, 2003 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Things haven't gone exactly as planned for the Eagles so far this season. Coach Andy Reid's original road map to Houston - site of Super Bowl XXXVIII - didn't include a malfunctioning passing game led by a quarterback with the NFL's worst passer rating and completion percentage. Or a defensive line and secondary ravaged by injuries. But at least one thing is still working as the Eagles reach the midpoint of their season with a game against the Atlanta Falcons this afternoon at the Georgia Dome.
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NEWS
September 10, 2016 | By Barbara Boyer, Staff Writer
The prosecutor asked for a five-year term. The defendant, in a plea deal, agreed to that. Millions were stolen, a reputed member of the mob already had received a 30-year term, and the judge was known to be tough. So what happened in federal court in Camden on Thursday was unexpected. U.S. District Judge Robert Kugler turned to Cory Leshner; called him a "good person" with no criminal history; noted that the 33-year-old defendant with a law degree had a wife who was expecting their second child, a supportive family, and a job waiting for him; and sentenced him to a two-year term.
NEWS
June 21, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
For most of Gov. Christie's tenure, political theater in Trenton has followed a familiar pattern: Democrats, over Republicans' objections, raise taxes to fund New Jersey's pension plans for public employees. Christie vetoes the legislation, presenting himself as fiscally responsible. Now the equation has changed. Facing pressure to replenish the state's empty fund for roads, bridges, and rail projects before the fiscal year ends June 30, some Democrats are questioning the wisdom of a proposal to raise the gas tax but cut other sources of revenue, and a handful of Republicans are supporting the idea.
NEWS
May 29, 2016 | Paul Jablow, FOR THE INQUIRER
The dentist and the ex-cop first met about five years ago at a pain management seminar at Tufts University. "He asked me what I was doing there," recalls Carlos Aquino, who spent 23 years on the Philadelphia police force before retiring in 1995 as a sergeant specializing in narcotics investigations. "When I told him, he understood. " Elliot Hersh, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania dental school who specializes in pharmacology, understood so well that he soon had Aquino lecturing his students on the dangers of overprescribing painkillers, including opioids such as Percocet and Vicodin.
SPORTS
October 2, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple coach Matt Rhule seems sure of this much: If his special teams hadn't improved from his first couple of seasons, his Owls football team wouldn't be undefeated right now. "I think our special teams has been the winning edge for us," Rhule said this week. "They've been the difference-maker for us. " There was a 100-yard kickoff return against Cincinnati. And that blocked extra point against Massachusetts which was picked up, handed off, and run back for a game-defining two points the other way. Rhule looks at the whole picture and sees more.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The health-care economic landscape shifted again Monday when Express Scripts, the nation's largest pharmacy benefits manager, chose sides in the high-priced market for hepatitis C medication. St. Louis-based Express Scripts said it would provide only one brand of hepatitis C medicine to most patients in its employer-sponsored health plans, choosing AbbVie Inc.'s new Viekira Pak after AbbVie gave it an undisclosed but "significant discount" on its list price of $83,000 for a 12-week treatment regimen.
NEWS
September 25, 2014
KNOW HOW POLITICS can often be predictable? Well, that's what happened at the Two-Toms debate Monday night in Hershey. Tom Corbett and Tom Wolf followed their respective scripts. The Republican incumbent - trailing in polls and campaign cash and still regarded the No. 1 vulnerable guv in America - took some sweeping swings at his challenger. When you're behind, that's what you do. In response, the Democratic upstart pulled a Wolf-a-dope, leaning on rhetorical ropes, staying calm, happy just to lay a few jabs on the titleholder's chin.
SPORTS
September 22, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
The crowd came out to Parx Racing to see a star on Saturday in the 35th running of the Pennsylvania Derby, and California Chrome looked perfect for the role of a Hollywood hero as he walked regally around the paddock, accepted Victor Espinoza onto his back, and stepped onto the track to play his part. And then they ran the race. Someone messed with the script, just as they had in June at the Belmont Stakes, when Chrome wasn't able to parlay wins in the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes into Triple Crown immortality.
SPORTS
July 17, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
MINNEAPOLIS - The moment was staged for TV. Red Sox manager John Farrell instructed White Sox shortstop Alexei Ramirez to wait until Fox returned from a commercial break between the third and fourth innings of Tuesday's 85th All-Star Game. Ramirez stepped onto the field at 8:31 p.m. Central time. A lone cameraman trailed him. Frank Sinatra crooned over the loudspeakers. Derek Jeter, a reluctant participant for this national farewell, acted as if he were surprised. But Major League Baseball, in conjunction with Fox and Jeter, plotted the celebration details before Tuesday's first pitch because the Yankees shortstop loathes gratuitous attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
It's not often I get to write an unabashed rave that's also an expression of civic pride, so listen up: The Arden Theatre's revival of Incorruptible is a valentine to and from the Philadelphia theater community. An Arden greatest hit from its 1995-96 season, it's written by Michael Hollinger, a Philadelphia-based playwright, and features an all-Philadelphia cast, director, and designers. But that's not the only reason you should care. You should care because this production, about a medieval French monastery whose saintly miracle-performing relics and income have both flatlined, has a nimble, sharp script matched with performances by a cast that's a natural fit. Proven entities such as Ian Merrill Peakes as Brother Martin, a high-strung, Machiavellian monk, and Marcia Saunders as Agatha, a tyrannical monster (monstress?
NEWS
May 14, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
AS IF THE Goffney twins' saga couldn't get any more unusual, their next chapter could pair them with another set of twins - police officers - to tell their story on film. Troy and Trevor Parham, founders of Twin Tone Entertainment, are no strangers to the media spotlight. In 2012, Trevor, a police officer in the tiny Delaware County borough of Colwyn, was criminally charged with assault and oppression for Tasing a teen while he was handcuffed in the borough's holding cell. Trevor was acquitted by a judge and has since returned to the Colwyn Police Department.
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