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NEWS
June 15, 1997 | By Todd Bishop, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
With black letters on aging gray parchment, the wood-handled scroll appears to have come straight from Mount Sinai. In spirit, say leaders of Shir Ami Congregation, it did. "It is the original," said Rabbi Gedaliah Druin, a scribe who just finished restoring the synagogue's Torah scroll, one of many such documents to survive the Holocaust. Members of the congregation paraded the Torah scroll, which contains the five books of Moses, through the streets of Newtown last week to mark the end of the yearlong restoration project.
NEWS
December 23, 1990 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
That giant Christmas card that Resorts International Casino sent to the American troops in the Middle East? That was nothing. Wimpy. It was only 325 square feet, for pete's sake. How many signatures could you get on that? But the scroll signed by patrons of restaurants, taverns and bars around Delaware County, now that meant business. A big, fat roll with 2,500 square feet of names and greetings, it kicked the butt of that casino card eight times over. "They were saying their card was the biggest," Mike DeMeglio, owner of the Red Eye Tavern in Springfield, said, scoffing at the competition from Atlantic City.
NEWS
March 19, 1992 | By Ken Dilanian, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The Nazis planned to include it in a museum exhibit chronicling an exterminated race. A stint in a damp Prague basement decayed it. A 1977 fire almost consumed it. But Holocaust Torah Scroll No. 348, which may have been written as far back as the 12th century, has now been restored - a job that took two years for the only rabbi in the Philadelphia area qualified to do it. And the handwritten scroll, which contains what is believed to be...
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Now tattered and indecipherable, the scroll once was held high every Sabbath and read aloud to tell the story of a people who were persecuted and survived. But the listeners did not survive. The 550-year-old Jewish community in Pisek, Czechoslovakia, was virtually wiped out in 1942, when the Nazis invaded the small town 40 miles south of Prague. And that is why Congregation Beth Emeth-B'nai Yitzhok has chosen Sunday, the day of remembrance for the victims of the Holocaust, to dedicate its newly acquired Torah scroll as a memorial to those who died, said Rabbi Herman Horowitz.
NEWS
October 18, 1987 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Jews, this is the season of new beginnings. September rang in the new year, Rosh Hashanah. Then came Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement from the old year. On Thursday, congregations in the Northeast and elsewhere marked another milestone - Simchat Torah, a day to give thanks for the Torah, also known as the five books of Moses, and to read the last scheduled passage for the year and to begin a new cycle. But for one congregation, the occasion was more memorable than usual.
NEWS
January 18, 2010 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The prayers of the world might be focused on Haiti, but Jewish tradition says God was paying special attention yesterday to a little rowhouse synagogue on South Fourth Street. "May all your prayers be answered," Torah scribe Menachem Youlus said each time he extended his ink-stained hand to the men and women departing the open Torah scroll at Congregation Shivtei Yeshuron Ezras Israel. More than 50 had come to ritually ink in a letter of the restored scroll, but few seemed prepared for the emotion of the moment.
NEWS
April 7, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The two West Chester University graduates were in a Warsaw hotel lobby late one afternoon in May 2012 when they were told of an antiques shop in an old neighborhood. "It was a shop that carried a mixture of Judaica and Nazi paraphernalia," Hilary Bentman said last week. An odd mix. But in the early evening, she and Hadassah DeJack went there. The Christian shopkeeper, whose grandparents had hidden Jews during World War II, asked if they would like to see a section of a Torah rescued from the Nazi occupation.
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer staff writer Lacy McCrary contributed to this article
Cantor Edmond A. Kulp held the Torah spindles and deftly rolled the scroll, first right, then left and back again with the quick motion he has learned over a lifetime of reading sacred Scriptures. At last he smiled. "This is definitely one of them," Kulp announced yesterday at the Lower Merion police station. Then he turned a second Torah in the same way and claimed it, too. "I can tell by the weight, by the print. I'm the one who reads them," he said. And so, Kulp, cantor for Congregation Beth Judah in Ventnor, N.J., had identified two of 15 Torahs stolen between Feb. 4 and last weekend in Southeastern Pennsylvania and South Jersey and recovered Wednesday by police in New York City.
NEWS
December 19, 1998 | By Nancy Phillips and John Way Jennings, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A key witness in the murder case against Rabbi Fred J. Neulander filed a complaint with Cherry Hill police yesterday, alleging that the rabbi had swindled him by selling him a flawed Torah for $16,000 four years ago. Myron "Pep" Levin told police he had asked Rabbi Neulander to purchase a Torah - a sacred hand-lettered scroll containing the first five books of the Old Testament - in honor of Levin's late wife, Reta. Levin then donated the Torah to Rabbi Neulander's Cherry Hill synagogue, M'kor Shalom.
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NEWS
May 14, 2013
Geza Vermes, 88, a translator of the Dead Sea Scrolls and renowned for books exploring the Jewish background of Jesus, died Wednesday, David Ariel, president of the Oxford Center for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, said Saturday. Mr. Vermes had an early interest in the Dead Sea Scrolls, a cache of documents written between 200 B.C. and A.D. 200 which were discovered in caves at Qumran, near Jericho, between 1947 and 1956. Mr. Vermes published the first English translation of the scrolls in 1962.
NEWS
April 7, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The two West Chester University graduates were in a Warsaw hotel lobby late one afternoon in May 2012 when they were told of an antiques shop in an old neighborhood. "It was a shop that carried a mixture of Judaica and Nazi paraphernalia," Hilary Bentman said last week. An odd mix. But in the early evening, she and Hadassah DeJack went there. The Christian shopkeeper, whose grandparents had hidden Jews during World War II, asked if they would like to see a section of a Torah rescued from the Nazi occupation.
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The pivotal moment at the "Dead Sea Scrolls" exhibition now at the Franklin Institute came for me in front of a glass case in which sits an incense holder about a foot high and a foot square. It's a sand-colored piece of pottery, scored with handmade Xs and what appear to be stamped circles. Scholars place it in a long-ago Jewish home in Israel, where it was discovered.   It is 3,000-odd years old. The first thing I noticed is the burn mark on its surface — the legacy of incense, as if it had been lit last night.
NEWS
May 15, 2012 | Stu Bykofsky
THE DEAD Sea Scrolls, in short (which they are not, running longer than a politician's promises), are the oldest known biblical manuscripts in existence. Perhaps the greatest archaeological find of the 20th century, they made their North American debut Saturday at the Franklin Institute, where they'll stay through mid-October. To many atheists, they are the Chronicles of Riddick, or a graphic novel. To most believers, the Dead Sea Scrolls — more than 900 parchments and fragments — offer proof (or at least evidence)
NEWS
May 11, 2012 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of history's greatest archaeological finds was so improbable that it borders on the miraculous. In 1947, a young Palestinian goatherder discovered a narrow cave entrance by the shores of the Dead Sea, in what is now Israel. Unsure of what he might find, the boy first threw a rock into its shadows and heard something shatter. Entering, he found dozens of tall clay pots packed with ancient writings. Known today as the Dead Sea Scrolls, the 972 parchments and papyrus fragments in this and other nearby caves contained some of the oldest surviving examples of Jewish scripture.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
  When the Franklin Institute opens its "Dead Sea Scrolls" exhibit May 12, visitors will catch a glimpse of one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of all time. Centerpiece of the exhibit will be 20 scroll fragments found in the 1940s in Palestine near the Dead Sea. They are part of an extraordinary trove of nearly 1,000 parchments that include the oldest surviving texts of the Jewish Bible, several of which will be on display in Philadelphia. Penned between 150 B.C. and A.D. 70 and sealed in urns, the scrolls make no mention of Jesus of Nazareth.
NEWS
September 27, 2011 | By Matti Friedman, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Two thousand years after they were written and decades after they were found in desert caves, some of the world-famous Dead Sea Scrolls went online for the first time Monday in a project launched by Israel's national museum and Google. The appearance of five of the most important Dead Sea scrolls on the Internet is part of a broader attempt by the custodians of the celebrated manuscripts - who were once criticized for allowing small circles of scholars to monopolize them - to make them available to anyone with a computer.
NEWS
April 30, 2011
Hubert J. Schlafly Jr., 91, who with two colleagues invented the first teleprompter in the late 1940s - a rudimentary device that has since evolved into computerized text scrolling across screens - died April 20 at a hospital near his home in Stamford, Conn. On Dec. 4, 1950, actors on the CBS soap opera The First Hundred Years turned their attention to a motorized scroll of paper lined with half-inch letters, mounted inside what looked like a suitcase and controlled by a stagehand.
NEWS
January 18, 2010 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The prayers of the world might be focused on Haiti, but Jewish tradition says God was paying special attention yesterday to a little rowhouse synagogue on South Fourth Street. "May all your prayers be answered," Torah scribe Menachem Youlus said each time he extended his ink-stained hand to the men and women departing the open Torah scroll at Congregation Shivtei Yeshuron Ezras Israel. More than 50 had come to ritually ink in a letter of the restored scroll, but few seemed prepared for the emotion of the moment.
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