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NEWS
April 5, 2012
Elizabeth Catlett, 96, a sculptor and printmaker renowned for her dignified portrayals of African American and Mexican women who was barred from her home country for political activism, died Monday in Cuernavaca, Mexico, where she had lived since 1976. Born in Washington, D.C., Ms. Catlett moved to Mexico in 1946, became friends with great Mexican muralist Diego Rivera and others in his circle, and married Mexican artist Francisco Mora. She became known for her commitment to winning greater rights for black people, women and workers in the United States and her adopted country.
NEWS
November 21, 1987 | Associated Press Inquirer art critic Edward J. Sozanski contributed to this article
Abstract sculptor Christopher Wilmarth, 44, whose works are exhibited in major museums around the country, has died after apparently hanging himself in his studio-apartment, police said. His body was discovered by his wife Thursday at their Brooklyn residence, said a police spokesman, Detective Joseph McConville. She said he had been under treatment for depression. He left no note, authorities said. Mr. Wilmarth's work is part of the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum, the Cooper Union Library and other museums and galleries in New York.
NEWS
August 17, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Chances are you see and interact with Zenos Frudakis quite often. You don't know him, and you probably haven't read about the 64-year-old sculptor unless you've glanced at captions on photos of his famous work in The Inquirer and elsewhere: the 10-foot-tall bronze Frank Rizzo sculpture at the Municipal Services Building Plaza across from City Hall; the similarly oversize Steve Carlton at Citizens Bank Park; the 16-foot-high, abstract bronze ...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1988 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
Je Duck Park, a young ceramic sculptor from Seoul, South Korea, is featured at the University of the Arts, his alma mater, in a solo exhibit organized by his former ceramics instructor, Bill Daley. A recent recipient of a master of fine arts degree from Michigan's Cranbrook Academy of Art, Park displays work he did this summer after returning here to the university's ceramic studio. Featured are his investigations of the structural and pictorial aspects of three-dimensional form and the viewer's relationship to those aspects.
NEWS
November 19, 2012
William Turnbull, 90, a highly regarded British sculptor who drew inspiration from primitive forms, died Thursday, according to the public relations firm Bolton & Quinn, which is promoting a forthcoming show of his work. The cause of death was not announced. Mr. Turnbull's works were frequently extremely simple shapes, suggesting masks or totem poles. He was exhibited at the prestigious Hayward, Serpentine, and Tate Galleries in London and the Berggruen Gallery in San Francisco. British sculptor Anthony Gormley described Mr. Turnbull as "a radical modernist who recognizes that sculpture is of its nature archaic.
NEWS
October 14, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial will be held Saturday, Oct. 19, for John A. Whereat, 55, a longtime Philadelphia sculptor, who died Saturday, Aug. 31, of heart failure at his home in Roxborough. The memorial is planned for 10 a.m. at the Radnor Friends Meeting House, Conestoga and Sproul Roads, his family announced last week. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Narberth, Mr. Whereat earned a bachelor's degree and, later, a master's degree in fine arts from the University of Pennsylvania. The bulk of his work, done in a garage on Spring Lane, is in private collections along the East Coast.
NEWS
April 10, 1986 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
Bruce Kelvin said he never liked attending art class when he was a student at Springfield High School. And he never thought he had any talent as an artist. Today, Kelvin, 37, devotes all of his time to his craft as a metal sculptor. Kelvin spends his days in a wheelchair in his Erdenheim studio, sculpting copper, brass and other metals to weld into wall hangings for homes and offices. Eight years ago, during a trip to a Virginia art show, Kelvin was the victim of a hit-and-run car accident.
NEWS
July 27, 2001 | By Kay Raftery INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Francis Wharton Stork, 89, of Wynnewood, a sculptor whose work is in galleries and private collections, died Sunday at Cottage Hospital in Woodsville, N.H. He was visiting his niece, Deborah Fisher Regan, in Bath, N.H., when he was taken ill. For more than 60 years, Mr. Stork sculpted in many media, including marble, onyx, bronze, walnut, oak and plaster. His work is exhibited at the Woodmere Art Museum, the Athenaeum of Philadelphia, and the Tyler Art Museum. Mr. Stork was born in Philadelphia, a great-great-nephew of Joseph Wharton, for whom the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania was named.
NEWS
October 23, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
A LONGTIME FRIEND said Robert Ash was "Philadelphia proud. " It was true that while this highly praised sculptor spent most of his time in Santa Fe, N.M., his thoughts remained in his native city. As a result, his family intends to place one of his more spectacular works in Philadelphia. The piece is called "Finding Grace," a bronze nude created in Robert's highly original style to express the uniqueness of the human experience. A site has yet to be chosen. Robert's works, a critic once said, "explored the complexity of the human spirit.
NEWS
June 18, 1994 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Aurielio Regis Milione, 77, a sculptor and master stone carver who left the indelible marks of his vanishing craft on buildings and statuary across Philadelphia and around the country, died Tuesday at his home, in Largo, Fla. He lived for many years in Springfield, Delaware County. Mr. Milione, who was known as Regis, learned much of his art from his father, Louis, and was respected both as a sculptor and as a stone carver. He was a major figure in restoration work around the country.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 8, 2016 | Thomas Hine, for The Inquirer
There is one joyous moment in the Fabric Workshop and Museum's current exhibition, "Ally," and it is about someone else's joy. It is a video, projected on a very large screen, showing the face of dancer-choreographer Anna Halprin as she watches a performance of Rope Dance, a work she created for this exhibition, in collaboration with sculptor Janine Antoni and choreographer Stephen Petronio. Halprin, who is 95, has a deeply lined face, and as she reacts to the dance, you can see where every wrinkle came from - some to express surprise, others to show concern, curiosity, amusement, elation, pride, and a flow of other emotions.
NEWS
October 23, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
A LONGTIME FRIEND said Robert Ash was "Philadelphia proud. " It was true that while this highly praised sculptor spent most of his time in Santa Fe, N.M., his thoughts remained in his native city. As a result, his family intends to place one of his more spectacular works in Philadelphia. The piece is called "Finding Grace," a bronze nude created in Robert's highly original style to express the uniqueness of the human experience. A site has yet to be chosen. Robert's works, a critic once said, "explored the complexity of the human spirit.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2015 | By A.M. Weaver, For The Inquirer
Five years ago, Miguel Horn returned to Philadelphia after living and working in Mexico as the assistant to acclaimed sculptor Javier Marin. An ambitious artist with Colombian and Venezuelan roots whose vision spans multiple communities and continents, Horn finds himself today, at 31, at a crossroads and immersed in determining the direction of his career. While public-art commissions punctuate his practice as a sculptor, he balances his portfolio with individual sculptures that express his inner psyche.
NEWS
August 29, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Karl O. Karhumaa, 90, a sculptor who taught at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts for more than 20 years, exerting a quiet but powerful influence on a generation of Philadelphia sculptors, died Monday at Wyndmoor Hills Health Care & Rehabilitation Center. He was recovering from a broken hip, friends said, when he died in his sleep. "He had a dry sense of humor, and his sculpture has humor - it's a lot like him," said friend and fellow sculptor Jerry Klein. Klein said Mr. Karhumaa was a figurative artist but saw figures "in a different way" than others at the academy.
NEWS
August 17, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Chances are you see and interact with Zenos Frudakis quite often. You don't know him, and you probably haven't read about the 64-year-old sculptor unless you've glanced at captions on photos of his famous work in The Inquirer and elsewhere: the 10-foot-tall bronze Frank Rizzo sculpture at the Municipal Services Building Plaza across from City Hall; the similarly oversize Steve Carlton at Citizens Bank Park; the 16-foot-high, abstract bronze ...
NEWS
July 21, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his studio in his serene backyard in Deptford, Frank Seder Jr. meticulously shaved a fine layer along a curve of a wooden crook. A chisel in the wrong direction, the artist noted, could cause an unsightly crack in the majestic, exotic purple wood from South America. "I have to make sure everything is going to fit perfect," Seder, 65, said while wearing a magnifying-lens headpiece. Perfect, for the pope. When Pope Francis travels to Philadelphia to cap the church's eighth World Meeting of Families in September, Seder, a lifelong Catholic and respected South Jersey sculptor, plans to offer the church's top leader the pastoral staff that he has been crafting for three months.
NEWS
June 29, 2015 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Tom Doyle is not the sort of artist who craved success, but it seems to have found him anyway. Prestigious awards and fellowships have been bestowed, commissions have come his way, and his sculptures have been included in major museum shows. Of late, however - and probably much to his amusement - the 87-year-old Roxbury, Conn., sculptor has become something of a cult figure. First, in 2008, came a rambling, insidery interview in the Brooklyn Rail with its publisher, Phong Bui, in which, among other things, Doyle recalled his 1957 arrival in New York after studying with Roy Lichtenstein at Ohio State University.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
CLARENCE QUEEN was a man of many talents. He could restore an antique car, remodel a house, sing professionally and make unique sculptures that won prizes. Clarence used his knowledge of auto mechanics and auto restoration to create sculptures out of auto parts and other discarded material, which were exhibited in Philadelphia and New York City galleries. "I fell in love with his art when I first saw it," said Marilyn Kai Jewett, who worked with Clarence to promote his art. "I had never seen anything like it. Clarence was a very unique sculptor.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
In the forlorn city of Chester, on a spot where creative magic - construction of oil tankers by Sun Shipbuilding & Drydock Co. for wartime and commercial use - once was worked precisely and abundantly, two brothers are unobtrusively continuing the artistic tradition. Larry and Randy Welker - the "La" and "Ran" of Laran Bronze Foundry - might not be high-profile, but the creations they and their workforce of nine have enabled the last 30 years sure are. One of them, the National World War II Memorial in Washington, has earned Laran serious industry credibility since its unveiling in April 2004.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
LUMBERTON - The large tree stump at Main and Landing Streets had bothered Tommy Shover since he took down the rest of the diseased red oak about five years ago. What could he do with it? As general foreman of Lumberton's public works department, he could saw it off to the ground - or he could ask his brother Guy to turn it into a work of art. And that's what happened Sunday while a small crowd watched mesmerized. Motorists opened their windows to offer praise every time the corner traffic light turned red. Over about 10 hours, the eyesore became a graceful bird in flight, the inner wood grain beautifully mimicking the feathers of the wings.
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