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Sculptor

SPORTS
August 7, 2013 | By Zach Helfand, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city will proceed with plans for a statue honoring boxing legend Joe Frazier despite the death of the statue's sculptor, Mayor Nutter said Monday. Lawrence J. Nowlan, 48, who was commissioned by a city panel in April to create the statue, died last Tuesday at his home in New Hampshire. Nutter said the panel would evaluate other submissions before deciding on a new sculptor. At the time of his death, Nowlan had not received final approval from the Philadelphia Arts Commission but had completed a mock-up of the final statue.
NEWS
August 7, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawrence Joseph Nowlan Jr., 48, formerly of Merion, a sculptor whose bronze likeness of Harry Kalas welcomes fans to Citizens Bank Park, died Tuesday, July 30, of a heart ailment at his home in Cornish, N.H. Mr. Nowlan was "a supremely gifted artist, capturing the essence of people whom he admired and respected," said Todd Palmer, his friend and college roommate. Mr. Nowlan was a lifelong athlete and sports fan. His passion for Philadelphia's professional teams led to an effort to memorialize Kalas, the longtime Phillies broadcaster.
NEWS
June 9, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - It appeared to be very bad timing Friday for the World Championship of Sand Sculpting to be taking delivery of 1.2 million pounds of sand just as the remnants of Tropical Storm Andrea dumped torrents of rain at the Jersey Shore. This is the same coastline, after all, where 10 million cubic yards of sand was displaced by Hurricane Sandy in the blink of an eye. But organizers were confident that the 470 cubic yards of sand trucked in from a Tuckahoe quarry would stay put where it was unloaded, along the south side of the Pier Shops at Caesars.
NEWS
May 29, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing on Hancock Avenue, Terry Jones easily imagines what happened that hot summer afternoon 150 years ago. The smoke from an artillery bombardment lifts like a curtain, and 12,000 gray-clad soldiers march across an open field as if on parade. Red battle flags with the blue St. Andrew's cross flutter overhead, officers' swords rise skyward, and a forest of musket barrels and bayonets gleams in the sun. The objective: a small clump of trees on Cemetery Ridge, the center of the federal line where a native Philadelphian, Brig.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2013 | By Ellen Scolnic, For The Inquirer
When sculptor Darla Jackson found herself creating castings of her life-size rabbit sculptures in her upstairs bathroom - mixing plaster in the tiny sink, dripping soapy residue on her toothbrush, and spilling the mess on the floor - she knew things had to change. Jackson thought there must be other artists out there trying to create in rowhouse bathrooms and basements, praying they didn't ruin yet another rug, or worse, set the house on fire. She dreamed of creating a space where fellow sculptors could use specialized machinery, share inspiration, and work in a safe environment.
NEWS
January 14, 2013 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
New art often comes with a backstory, which can be useful in helping identify a point of entry into otherwise-enigmatic work. The genesis of Daniel Arsham's sculpture at the Fabric Workshop and Museum is particularly dramatic, to the point where the story implants itself so firmly in the viewer's consciousness that it biases one's evaluation of the artist's efforts. Arsham makes sure this happens by including in his installation, "Reach Ruin," a sculpture incorporating sound, light, and music that re-creates a cataclysmic event and his enduring memory of it. The event was Hurricane Andrew, one of the most powerful and destructive storms in U.S. history, which struck Florida in late August 1992.
NEWS
November 19, 2012
William Turnbull, 90, a highly regarded British sculptor who drew inspiration from primitive forms, died Thursday, according to the public relations firm Bolton & Quinn, which is promoting a forthcoming show of his work. The cause of death was not announced. Mr. Turnbull's works were frequently extremely simple shapes, suggesting masks or totem poles. He was exhibited at the prestigious Hayward, Serpentine, and Tate Galleries in London and the Berggruen Gallery in San Francisco. British sculptor Anthony Gormley described Mr. Turnbull as "a radical modernist who recognizes that sculpture is of its nature archaic.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2012
Conan (11 p.m., TBS) - Mindy Kaling; micro-sculptor Willard Wigan; Barry Rothbart. The Colbert Report (11:30 p.m., COM) - Political commentator Andrew Sullivan. The Daily Show With Jon Stewart (Midnight, COM) - Election news and results analysis from the team.  
SPORTS
November 2, 2012
JOE FRAZIER beat Muhammad Ali. March 8, 1971, Madison Square Garden. Knocked him down in the 15th round with a brutal left hook that left Ali's jaw as lumpy as a bag of peanuts. It was the fight of the century, pick a century. And now, fight fans will get a chance to watch it again, at City Hall, at $1,000 a pop, the proceeds going to erect a statue honoring Frazier, the winner and heavyweight champion of the world. "Jerry Perenchio, the promoter of that fight, owned the exclusive rights to the film," explained attorney Richard Handley, who is the liaison between the city, Xfinity Live!
NEWS
September 12, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
IT SURE beats a pan of paella. Although there's nothing wrong with this rice dish, often served with seafood on a large pan, Maximillian was a better choice. Robert Phillips, a prominent local sculptor who worked in iron, convinced the owners of the Striped Bass restaurant at 15th and Walnut streets in 1994 that a fish named Maximillian would be a better choice as a decorative piece to hide the oven's hood. And what a fish! Bob Phillips' fish is an amazing work of art, 16 feet long, 7 feet wide, 4 feet thick and weighing about 400 pounds.
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