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Sculptor

NEWS
November 17, 2014
An article Sunday on the Cheltenham School District misidentified literacy instructor Christine Long, and the name of interim Superintendent Joe Kircher was misspelled. A Galleries article in the Live Life Love arts section on Sunday misstated the year in which sculptor Robinson Fredenthal died. He died in 2009. The article should have said his works have been housed since 2003 in the Architectural Archives at the University of Pennsylvania, in his own collection, not that of Louis Kahn.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2014 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Two much-admired Philadelphia sculptors are being remembered in eloquent exhibitions that should not be missed. Robinson Fredenthal's enormous, geometric steel sculptures are ubiquitous in this city if you know where to look: in the lobby and outdoor plaza of the SEPTA building at 1234 Market St.; in a pedestrian walkway behind the Wells Fargo Bank on Market between Fourth and Fifth Streets; at Eighth and Spring Garden; and on Woodland Walk, near...
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THAT BEAUTIFUL woman prowling around the junk yard, what could she be looking for? Or rooting in trash bins. Or just ransacking the urban environment for the castoffs of a reckless society. It would have been the artist Dina Wind, looking for discarded objects that she could fashion into the installations that made her one of Philadelphia's more interesting artists. She took old car fenders and other auto castoffs, as well as tools - hammers, saws, pliers, shears and the like - and welded them into shapes and contours that the motorists who once drove the cars and the workers who once wielded the tools wouldn't have recognized.
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Jenna Kuerzi describes Clair, her onstage character, as a "very nervous person. " It's V-J Day, Aug. 14, 1945, and Clair is going to kiss a sailor while a photographer captures the moment in Times Square. Needless to say she has no idea she's also going to go down in history. That's the premise of Unconditional Surrender , one of three short plays premiering Friday in the East Gallery of Grounds for Sculpture, in Hamilton Township, Mercer County (groundsforsculpture.org/events)
SPORTS
July 22, 2014 | BY JAKE KAPLAN, Daily News Staff Writer kaplanj@phillynews.com
THE ENORMITY of it catches you off guard. Even though you walk into the room knowing what you're there to see, visualizing a 9-foot effigy is different from actually standing next to one. Currently a few hundred-pound mixture of clay and foam dominating a second-floor Fishtown studio, the much-anticipated statue of late Philadelphia boxing icon Smokin' Joe Frazier is about 6 months from completion. After 4 months, the mold has certainly taken shape, but sculptor Stephen Layne expects to take time through September to accentuate features such as the gloves and shoes and otherwise fine-tune the project.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By A.M. Weaver, For The Inquirer
David Stephens, at 72 years of age, is a man quietly on a mission - to not let anything keep him from his art. In his exhibition "Auguries of Idolatry" at the Center for Art in Wood, his sculptures loom large, some of them 9 feet tall. The wooden altars are devoted to Stephens' deceased family members, ancestors, and acquaintances, flanked by structures that resemble stools made for offerings. Declared legally blind in 1979 due to glaucoma, the renowned Philadelphia artist continues to produce works that reveal a dynamic, sharp vision.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT WAS JUST like Jack Thompson to think of plucking a hair from the tail of a tiger. Well, he didn't pluck it himself. He got a keeper at the Philadelphia Zoo to do the plucking by holding a piece of meat in one hand and grabbing the hair with the other. "It was a great thing," said Jack's wife, Mary Pat Timony. "He was jumping up and down. " What, you might well ask, did Jack Thompson want with the hair of a tiger? He was working as the advertising manager for a company called Nuclide Industries, which made mass spectrometers - used to "determine the elemental signature of a sample," as it is described - like the hair of a tiger.
NEWS
October 14, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial will be held Saturday, Oct. 19, for John A. Whereat, 55, a longtime Philadelphia sculptor, who died Saturday, Aug. 31, of heart failure at his home in Roxborough. The memorial is planned for 10 a.m. at the Radnor Friends Meeting House, Conestoga and Sproul Roads, his family announced last week. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Narberth, Mr. Whereat earned a bachelor's degree and, later, a master's degree in fine arts from the University of Pennsylvania. The bulk of his work, done in a garage on Spring Lane, is in private collections along the East Coast.
NEWS
August 8, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JOE FRAZIER'S left hook, the one that floored Muhammad Ali in their "Fight of the Century" in Madison Square Garden in 1971, could be preserved for all time if and when a statue of the Philly boxing legend will be completed. The fate of that memorial was left frozen with the death July 30 of Lawrence J. Nowlan Jr., the world-renowned sculptor who had started working on it. The Philadelphia-born Nowlan had completed a mock-up of the bronze statue, which he planned to be 8 feet tall and weigh 800 pounds, when he died of heart disease at his home in Cornish, N.H. He was 48. Mayor Nutter said the city will proceed with plans for a statue of Philly's most revered boxer, but how that will be accomplished is uncertain.
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