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Sculptor

SPORTS
July 22, 2014 | BY JAKE KAPLAN, Daily News Staff Writer kaplanj@phillynews.com
THE ENORMITY of it catches you off guard. Even though you walk into the room knowing what you're there to see, visualizing a 9-foot effigy is different from actually standing next to one. Currently a few hundred-pound mixture of clay and foam dominating a second-floor Fishtown studio, the much-anticipated statue of late Philadelphia boxing icon Smokin' Joe Frazier is about 6 months from completion. After 4 months, the mold has certainly taken shape, but sculptor Stephen Layne expects to take time through September to accentuate features such as the gloves and shoes and otherwise fine-tune the project.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By A.M. Weaver, For The Inquirer
David Stephens, at 72 years of age, is a man quietly on a mission - to not let anything keep him from his art. In his exhibition "Auguries of Idolatry" at the Center for Art in Wood, his sculptures loom large, some of them 9 feet tall. The wooden altars are devoted to Stephens' deceased family members, ancestors, and acquaintances, flanked by structures that resemble stools made for offerings. Declared legally blind in 1979 due to glaucoma, the renowned Philadelphia artist continues to produce works that reveal a dynamic, sharp vision.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT WAS JUST like Jack Thompson to think of plucking a hair from the tail of a tiger. Well, he didn't pluck it himself. He got a keeper at the Philadelphia Zoo to do the plucking by holding a piece of meat in one hand and grabbing the hair with the other. "It was a great thing," said Jack's wife, Mary Pat Timony. "He was jumping up and down. " What, you might well ask, did Jack Thompson want with the hair of a tiger? He was working as the advertising manager for a company called Nuclide Industries, which made mass spectrometers - used to "determine the elemental signature of a sample," as it is described - like the hair of a tiger.
NEWS
February 7, 2014
In a story Thursday on "Monument Men," the name of sculptor Walker K. Hancock was misspelled.
NEWS
October 14, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial will be held Saturday, Oct. 19, for John A. Whereat, 55, a longtime Philadelphia sculptor, who died Saturday, Aug. 31, of heart failure at his home in Roxborough. The memorial is planned for 10 a.m. at the Radnor Friends Meeting House, Conestoga and Sproul Roads, his family announced last week. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Narberth, Mr. Whereat earned a bachelor's degree and, later, a master's degree in fine arts from the University of Pennsylvania. The bulk of his work, done in a garage on Spring Lane, is in private collections along the East Coast.
NEWS
August 8, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JOE FRAZIER'S left hook, the one that floored Muhammad Ali in their "Fight of the Century" in Madison Square Garden in 1971, could be preserved for all time if and when a statue of the Philly boxing legend will be completed. The fate of that memorial was left frozen with the death July 30 of Lawrence J. Nowlan Jr., the world-renowned sculptor who had started working on it. The Philadelphia-born Nowlan had completed a mock-up of the bronze statue, which he planned to be 8 feet tall and weigh 800 pounds, when he died of heart disease at his home in Cornish, N.H. He was 48. Mayor Nutter said the city will proceed with plans for a statue of Philly's most revered boxer, but how that will be accomplished is uncertain.
SPORTS
August 7, 2013 | By Zach Helfand, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city will proceed with plans for a statue honoring boxing legend Joe Frazier despite the death of the statue's sculptor, Mayor Nutter said Monday. Lawrence J. Nowlan, 48, who was commissioned by a city panel in April to create the statue, died last Tuesday at his home in New Hampshire. Nutter said the panel would evaluate other submissions before deciding on a new sculptor. At the time of his death, Nowlan had not received final approval from the Philadelphia Arts Commission but had completed a mock-up of the final statue.
NEWS
August 7, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawrence Joseph Nowlan Jr., 48, formerly of Merion, a sculptor whose bronze likeness of Harry Kalas welcomes fans to Citizens Bank Park, died Tuesday, July 30, of a heart ailment at his home in Cornish, N.H. Mr. Nowlan was "a supremely gifted artist, capturing the essence of people whom he admired and respected," said Todd Palmer, his friend and college roommate. Mr. Nowlan was a lifelong athlete and sports fan. His passion for Philadelphia's professional teams led to an effort to memorialize Kalas, the longtime Phillies broadcaster.
NEWS
June 9, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - It appeared to be very bad timing Friday for the World Championship of Sand Sculpting to be taking delivery of 1.2 million pounds of sand just as the remnants of Tropical Storm Andrea dumped torrents of rain at the Jersey Shore. This is the same coastline, after all, where 10 million cubic yards of sand was displaced by Hurricane Sandy in the blink of an eye. But organizers were confident that the 470 cubic yards of sand trucked in from a Tuckahoe quarry would stay put where it was unloaded, along the south side of the Pier Shops at Caesars.
NEWS
May 29, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing on Hancock Avenue, Terry Jones easily imagines what happened that hot summer afternoon 150 years ago. The smoke from an artillery bombardment lifts like a curtain, and 12,000 gray-clad soldiers march across an open field as if on parade. Red battle flags with the blue St. Andrew's cross flutter overhead, officers' swords rise skyward, and a forest of musket barrels and bayonets gleams in the sun. The objective: a small clump of trees on Cemetery Ridge, the center of the federal line where a native Philadelphian, Brig.
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