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Sculptor

NEWS
June 20, 2012
Barton Lidice Benes, 69, a New York sculptor who worked in materials that he called artifacts of everyday life, expanded his definition of everyday as he went. He used the everyday mementos of childhood in his early work, and later made sculptures from chopped-up, everyday U.S. cash (purchased pre-shredded from the Federal Reserve). When friends started dying of AIDS, and Mr. Benes himself tested HIV-positive, he began working in everyday materials of the epidemic - pills and capsules, intravenous tubes, HIV-infected blood, and cremated human remains.
NEWS
April 5, 2012
Elizabeth Catlett, 96, a sculptor and printmaker renowned for her dignified portrayals of African American and Mexican women who was barred from her home country for political activism, died Monday in Cuernavaca, Mexico, where she had lived since 1976. Born in Washington, D.C., Ms. Catlett moved to Mexico in 1946, became friends with great Mexican muralist Diego Rivera and others in his circle, and married Mexican artist Francisco Mora. She became known for her commitment to winning greater rights for black people, women and workers in the United States and her adopted country.
SPORTS
March 9, 2012
JOE HAND IS going to build a statue of Joe Frazier. No ifs, ands or buttresses about it. Going to hire a sculptor, approve a design, carve it, bronze it, erect it on a lovely spot near Xfinity Live. Unveil it on Jan. 12, 2013. (Maybe Michael Buffer growling, "Let's get ready for humble. ") "We are going to celebrate Joe's birthday right there," Hand said emphatically, ignoring the can't-be-done whispers. He's going to raise $200,000, choose a sculptor, agree on a pose, get it built, bronzed and fastened to a handsome marble slab, all in 310 days?
NEWS
March 6, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Royal T. Popper, 88, formerly of Center City, an orthodontist, sculptor, and arts patron, died of complications from hip surgery Sunday, Feb. 26, at Ann's Choice, a retirement community in Warminster. For 35 years, Dr. Popper maintained an orthodontics office in Olney. He had a busy practice straightening the teeth of students at nearby Central and Girls High Schools, said a son, Howard. For several years, Dr. Popper also had an office in Delaware County and taught anatomy at the Temple University School of Dentistry.
NEWS
February 14, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Victor's first chocolate sculpting job nearly ended in a meltdown. The Conshohocken sculptor made busts of stars Mickey Rooney and Ann Miller for a 1982 celebration of the 1,000th performance of the Broadway musical Sugar Babies . The famously big-haired Miller swept into the party and then slammed into the sculpture table. Chocolate heads rolled. Candied Ann's neck was broken; Mickey's nose, crushed. At that moment, Victor's fears about trading on his Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts training to make figures out of food seemed to crystallize.
NEWS
November 30, 2011
Sergio Scaglietti, 91, who used intuitive genius and a hammer - seldom blueprints or sketches - to sculpt elegant Ferraris that won Grand Prix races in the 1950s and '60s and that now sell for millions of dollars, died Nov. 20 at his home in Modena, Italy. Ferraris, with their hair-raising acceleration and sleek lines, bespoke postwar modernity in the manner of the Color Field paintings of Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko or the architecture of Eero Saarinen. Mr. Scaglietti in the 1950s designed the bloodred skin of the 375mm sports car that film director Roberto Rossellini, the master of neorealist cinema, gave to his wife, Ingrid Bergman.
NEWS
September 27, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Sculptor Jordan Griska couldn't talk for long Monday. "I'm in the middle of lifting an airplane," he said over the phone from his West Philadelphia studio, an old trolley shed on Haverford Avenue. The airplane in question, a decommissioned Cold War submarine bomber, has taken on a new life in Griska's hands. It has become a work of art, a sculptural installation for the pristine Lenfest Plaza. There, in the shadow of Claes Oldenburg's newly installed giant paintbrush at Broad and Cherry Streets, Griska's plane will rest, nose driven into the ground next to the historic Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.
NEWS
September 26, 2011
Mohammed Ghani Hikmat, 82, the Iraqi sculptor who created many of Baghdad's most famous landmarks and who led the effort to recover works of art looted from the National Museum of Iraq after the fall of Saddam Hussein, died Sept. 12 in Amman, Jordan, where he had gone for medical treatment. The cause was kidney failure, his son, Yasser Mohammed, said. In the 1960s and '70s, Mr. Hikmat created many sculptures that were inspired by the Middle Eastern fables 1,001 Nights and were placed in bustling parts of the city.
SPORTS
August 17, 2011
THEY'RE NOT done. No sooner was the spectacular statue of Harry Kalas finally unveiled last night than its grass-roots organizers and sculptor were dreaming up the next step, channeling Harry as they spoke. "Obviously, Harry can stand on his own," Lawrence J. Nowlan, the sculptor, said afterward, as the throng of fans who surrounded the unveiling ceremony took turns touching and admiring the statue placed in the plaza below Harry the K's in the leftfield corner of Citizens Bank Park.
NEWS
July 29, 2011 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
FRANK BENDER, who helped identify hundreds of victims of violence and bring many of the perpetrators to justice over a long career as a forensic sculptor, was confronted by his greatest challenge that fall of 2000. He had to sculpt a face where there was no face. The skeletal remains of a woman had been found in a wooded area of Manlius, N.Y., a town near Syracuse. The skull was a shell and there was no face. Told it was impossible to create something out of nothing, Bender rose to the challenge.
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