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ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1990 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
The exhibition of sculpture by the late Henry Mitchell that fills both the Paley and Levy Galleries at Moore College of Art and Design pays homage to an artist whose creations adorn a number of public spaces in the city. Mitchell's pieces, like the impala fountain at the zoo and the cat fountain at the Betsy Ross House, are highly visible; Mitchell is less well known. This exhibition of 59 pieces, the majority of them maquettes for public commissions, seeks to offer Mitchell some belated recognition for enlivening the city's public landscape.
NEWS
April 15, 1990 | Special to the Inquirer / JOAN FAIRMAN KANES
Sculptor Peter Rockwell, a 1958 graduate of Haverford College, is an artist-in-residence there this semester. With the help of nine student apprentices, he has been carving a "climbing sculpture" from a 5-ton block of Indiana limestone. Earlier this month, the unfinished sculpture was loaded onto a pickup and driven from the foundry to a spot near the campus library, where it was installed with the help of a crane. Rockwell, who is the son of Norman Rockwell, and his students will continue working on the statue, which was designed for children to clamber on, climb over and crawl through.
NEWS
April 2, 1989 | By Will Thompson, Inquirer Staff Writer
The idea to do a plaster-of-Paris sculpture of himself for a special art project, Craig Culley recalls, came to him in December during a sudden burst of inspiration. "The feeling was very strong and inspirational," he explained. "It was a feeling that God is really a part of me, as he is a part of everybody. It was a feeling full of love and compassion. " Culley, an 18-year-old resident of Brookhaven and a senior at Sun Valley Senior High School in Aston, created the six-foot-wide and eight-foot-high sculpture with plaster of Paris and called it "My Sunday Mourning.
NEWS
May 4, 1989 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
For the first time since 1975, there won't be an outdoor-sculpture exhibition in Philadelphia this summer. Marsha Moss, who has single-handedly organized the shows, held for the last three summers at the arboretum in Fairmount Park, has canceled this year's edition. Moss said she took the action because the city was unlikely to help defray the expenses of an outdoor show, which it has done in the past. She has turned back an $8,000 grant she received for the show from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, she said, and has notified about 150 artists who responded to a call for proposals that the show will not take place.
NEWS
August 8, 1986 | By SANDY SORLIEN, Special to the Daily News
Storm King Art Center is a 350-acre sculpture park nestled among wooded mountains in New York's Hudson Valley. All right, you've seen wooded mountains before. (But these plunge dramatically into the wide blue Hudson River! Yes, it really is sort of blue up here, an hour north of Manhattan.) Getting here is half the fun: the drive along the Palisades Parkway is beautiful and the view from scenic overlooks around West Point is breathtaking. Picture a meeting of a hundred brightly colored extraterrestrials from many planets gathered on a golf course.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
The fourth and final Challenge exhibition at the Fleisher Art Memorial is not only the best of the 1989-90 series but is also one of the most impressive shows of recent years there. The artists are Syd Carpenter, who makes ceramic sculpture; Judith Schaechter, who works in stained glass, and Nicholas Kripol, a Tyler School of Art ceramics professor whose sculptures for this show are made of stabilized adobe. For the last few years, Carpenter's sculpture has evolved from table-top pieces closely tied to craft antecedents to large, complex wall pieces.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1990 | By Jennifer Crohn, Special to The Inquirer
Phoebe Adams' sculptures, like myths bearing the germ of truth, seem to emerge fully formed from an intuitive, subconscious understanding of the way the world fits together. An overview at Beaver College of her work since the mid-1980s illuminates the gradual evolution of her ideas. Adams has been aptly compared with the 20th-century artists Jean Arp, Joan Miro and Louise Bourgeois, but some of her work also bears a resemblance to the 16th-century paintings of Hieronymous Bosch.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1999 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Steve Riedell didn't invent the shaped painting, but he has given it an unusual twist. He creates the painting and its support separately, then combines them. The method is demanding, but the result is an object that, paradoxically, accentuates its "painted" quality. Riedell's exhibition at Larry Becker Contemporary Art contains 12 such paintings made over the last several years. Some are essentially flat, while others project from the wall like sculptures. Each piece is a wood construction derived from an architectural source covered with painted canvas.
NEWS
June 4, 1986 | By Arlene Martin, Special to The Inquirer
From Israel to Mexico to New York From Israel to Mexico to New York to Berlin, N.J., the Ascalon family has traveled and lived as artists who specialize in religious works. The Ascalon tradition of sculpture and crafting began with Maurice Ascalon, whose hammered bronze sculpture dominated the Palestine pavilion at the 1939 New York World's Fair. Later, in Israel, Maurice Ascalon operated a metal works that popularized a green patina finish often associated with the Israeli crafts industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1995 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Fritz Dietel's sculpture has always displayed a consistent dedication to process. The viewer can't help but marvel at the way he coaxes wood into improbable configurations by bending, laminating and steaming. Yet while these processes and the labor they entail is always evident, it's the forms themselves that command the viewer's attention. In his show of new work at Schmidt/Dean Gallery, Dietel moves in unexpected directions. A large globular shape woven of white oak slats, open at the bottom and dyed yellow-green, resembles a huge ball of yarn - not exactly what we have come to expect from this artist.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
A sculpture in memory of a girl who loved to read has been removed from storage, reconfigured, and installed in front of the Cherry Hill Public Library. "I'm overwhelmed," says Sally Callaghan, the indefatigable leader of the equally indefatigable band of art lovers who together saved a piece of cultural history few others seemed to care about all that much. "It took 13 years to get to this. " We're standing outside the library, where the sculptor David Ascalon's handsome reinterpretation of the original piece commands a grassy spot overlooking Kings Highway.
NEWS
March 16, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, CULTURE WRITER
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts has acquired more than 40 works, including an enormous 1870 oil by the Hudson River School painter David Johnson, and a marble sculpture, white as a puffball, by Harriet Hosmer, considered the preeminent American female neoclassical sculptor of the 19th century. In addition, PAFA officials announced Monday, the museum has added to its holdings of more recent art, acquiring pieces by Theodore Harris, Emil Lukas, and Brian Tolle, and a large collection of works made from 1978 to 2010 by academy alumna Anne Minich.
NEWS
February 1, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
Thousands of people flocked Saturday to Mount Holly, scouring the area for parking spots and then joining a downtown throng to soak up colorful sights and sunshine just one week after a major storm barreled through the area. They came to see sculptors create masterpieces from ice that was bound up in 300-pound blocks, not swirling about and wreaking havoc. Oh yes, they came, too, for the spicy hot chili that was being served up as the annual Fire & Ice Festival unfolded on a three-block stretch in the business district.
NEWS
January 11, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Ritter & Shay are best known for designing the extraordinary trio of art deco skyscrapers that hover over Center City like giant frosted wedding cakes: the Drake , One East Penn Square , and the U.S. Custom House. But before the architects made it big downtown, they designed a modest commercial building for North Broad Street. Their contribution to the boulevard's collection of architectural riches is the Broad Street Trust Co., just above Stiles Street. Built in 1927, the four-story limestone building predates Ritter & Shay's first art deco skyscraper, the Drake, by two years.
NEWS
December 21, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Staff Writer
What once was lost may well be found, but with public art, there are usually no saviors, and fate is unpredictable. Take, for instance, two sets of monumental sculptures removed in 1961 from the landmark Witherspoon Building at Walnut and Juniper Streets. One group of nine-foot statues, fashioned by Alexander Stirling Calder, was taken down, stored, and re-installed in 1967 in the court of the Presbyterian Historical Society's new home on Lombard Street in Society Hill. The other, a group of 10 enormous biblical prophets created by the renowned Thomas Eakins and his friend and former student Samuel Murray, became the Lost Prophets, dealt off for a pittance in the 1960s and forgotten, but recently rediscovered.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Rea Rossi, sound has always been a tricky thing: elusive and slippery, wrangled only with therapy, concentration, and excellent hearing aids. So Rossi, 29, an artist based in Fishtown, began contemplating how to capture it and make it tangible, solid enough to wrap around a wrist or drape over her shoulders. The resulting artworks - visualizations meant to represent sound waves created in a computer-assisted design program and 3D-printed from nylon - are somewhere on the spectrum between jewelry and sculpture.
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On Tuesday morning, atop the cinematic steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, officials will unveil a special loan, in honor of Pope Francis - a monumental bilingual version of Robert Indiana's famous  LOVE  sculpture. AMOR  will overlook the Benjamin Franklin Parkway where Pope Francis will conduct his papal Mass on Sunday, Sept. 27. Officials at the Art Museum and the Association for Public Art, who arranged a four-month loan of the colorful six-foot sculpture, noted that  amor  means  love  both in Latin, the classic language of the church, and in Spanish, Francis' native language.
NEWS
September 5, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The anonymous messages ranged from the universal - "World Peace! World Peace! World Peace!" - to the deeply personal: "Prayers for my son having a liver transplant. " "I pray that I will be able to fully accept my son's homosexuality. " And: "Grieving the loss of my dear husband of 37 years. " Knotted ribbons of white cloth bearing prayers and statements of personal struggle rippled in the breeze Thursday outside the Cathedral Basilica of SS. Peter and Paul. More than 30,000 streamers of hope and faith fluttered during the dedication of the "Knotted Grotto" outside the cathedral.
NEWS
August 29, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Karl O. Karhumaa, 90, a sculptor who taught at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts for more than 20 years, exerting a quiet but powerful influence on a generation of Philadelphia sculptors, died Monday at Wyndmoor Hills Health Care & Rehabilitation Center. He was recovering from a broken hip, friends said, when he died in his sleep. "He had a dry sense of humor, and his sculpture has humor - it's a lot like him," said friend and fellow sculptor Jerry Klein. Klein said Mr. Karhumaa was a figurative artist but saw figures "in a different way" than others at the academy.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
A glance down the hallway toward the gallery of the Woodmere Art Museum, where its 74th Annual Juried Exhibition begins, reveals the quirky aesthetic of jurors and artist brothers Steven and Billy Dufala. In the distance, an enormous, featureless, off-white creature shaped like a cross between a duck and a sheep lies on the floor. Behind it is a large painting of two women standing side by side against a starry night, one holding an ungainly cloudlike form, the other's face hidden by a mass of droopy hair - or something like hair.
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