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ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1990 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
The exhibition of sculpture by the late Henry Mitchell that fills both the Paley and Levy Galleries at Moore College of Art and Design pays homage to an artist whose creations adorn a number of public spaces in the city. Mitchell's pieces, like the impala fountain at the zoo and the cat fountain at the Betsy Ross House, are highly visible; Mitchell is less well known. This exhibition of 59 pieces, the majority of them maquettes for public commissions, seeks to offer Mitchell some belated recognition for enlivening the city's public landscape.
NEWS
April 15, 1990 | Special to the Inquirer / JOAN FAIRMAN KANES
Sculptor Peter Rockwell, a 1958 graduate of Haverford College, is an artist-in-residence there this semester. With the help of nine student apprentices, he has been carving a "climbing sculpture" from a 5-ton block of Indiana limestone. Earlier this month, the unfinished sculpture was loaded onto a pickup and driven from the foundry to a spot near the campus library, where it was installed with the help of a crane. Rockwell, who is the son of Norman Rockwell, and his students will continue working on the statue, which was designed for children to clamber on, climb over and crawl through.
NEWS
April 2, 1989 | By Will Thompson, Inquirer Staff Writer
The idea to do a plaster-of-Paris sculpture of himself for a special art project, Craig Culley recalls, came to him in December during a sudden burst of inspiration. "The feeling was very strong and inspirational," he explained. "It was a feeling that God is really a part of me, as he is a part of everybody. It was a feeling full of love and compassion. " Culley, an 18-year-old resident of Brookhaven and a senior at Sun Valley Senior High School in Aston, created the six-foot-wide and eight-foot-high sculpture with plaster of Paris and called it "My Sunday Mourning.
NEWS
May 4, 1989 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
For the first time since 1975, there won't be an outdoor-sculpture exhibition in Philadelphia this summer. Marsha Moss, who has single-handedly organized the shows, held for the last three summers at the arboretum in Fairmount Park, has canceled this year's edition. Moss said she took the action because the city was unlikely to help defray the expenses of an outdoor show, which it has done in the past. She has turned back an $8,000 grant she received for the show from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, she said, and has notified about 150 artists who responded to a call for proposals that the show will not take place.
NEWS
August 8, 1986 | By SANDY SORLIEN, Special to the Daily News
Storm King Art Center is a 350-acre sculpture park nestled among wooded mountains in New York's Hudson Valley. All right, you've seen wooded mountains before. (But these plunge dramatically into the wide blue Hudson River! Yes, it really is sort of blue up here, an hour north of Manhattan.) Getting here is half the fun: the drive along the Palisades Parkway is beautiful and the view from scenic overlooks around West Point is breathtaking. Picture a meeting of a hundred brightly colored extraterrestrials from many planets gathered on a golf course.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
The fourth and final Challenge exhibition at the Fleisher Art Memorial is not only the best of the 1989-90 series but is also one of the most impressive shows of recent years there. The artists are Syd Carpenter, who makes ceramic sculpture; Judith Schaechter, who works in stained glass, and Nicholas Kripol, a Tyler School of Art ceramics professor whose sculptures for this show are made of stabilized adobe. For the last few years, Carpenter's sculpture has evolved from table-top pieces closely tied to craft antecedents to large, complex wall pieces.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1990 | By Jennifer Crohn, Special to The Inquirer
Phoebe Adams' sculptures, like myths bearing the germ of truth, seem to emerge fully formed from an intuitive, subconscious understanding of the way the world fits together. An overview at Beaver College of her work since the mid-1980s illuminates the gradual evolution of her ideas. Adams has been aptly compared with the 20th-century artists Jean Arp, Joan Miro and Louise Bourgeois, but some of her work also bears a resemblance to the 16th-century paintings of Hieronymous Bosch.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1999 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Steve Riedell didn't invent the shaped painting, but he has given it an unusual twist. He creates the painting and its support separately, then combines them. The method is demanding, but the result is an object that, paradoxically, accentuates its "painted" quality. Riedell's exhibition at Larry Becker Contemporary Art contains 12 such paintings made over the last several years. Some are essentially flat, while others project from the wall like sculptures. Each piece is a wood construction derived from an architectural source covered with painted canvas.
NEWS
June 4, 1986 | By Arlene Martin, Special to The Inquirer
From Israel to Mexico to New York From Israel to Mexico to New York to Berlin, N.J., the Ascalon family has traveled and lived as artists who specialize in religious works. The Ascalon tradition of sculpture and crafting began with Maurice Ascalon, whose hammered bronze sculpture dominated the Palestine pavilion at the 1939 New York World's Fair. Later, in Israel, Maurice Ascalon operated a metal works that popularized a green patina finish often associated with the Israeli crafts industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1995 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Fritz Dietel's sculpture has always displayed a consistent dedication to process. The viewer can't help but marvel at the way he coaxes wood into improbable configurations by bending, laminating and steaming. Yet while these processes and the labor they entail is always evident, it's the forms themselves that command the viewer's attention. In his show of new work at Schmidt/Dean Gallery, Dietel moves in unexpected directions. A large globular shape woven of white oak slats, open at the bottom and dyed yellow-green, resembles a huge ball of yarn - not exactly what we have come to expect from this artist.
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NEWS
October 6, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gone is the sprawling complex of buildings where the recording industry took root and made history in downtown Camden more than a century ago. The lone reminder of the city's crucial role in the early music business is the Victor apartment building with its iconic Nipper tower and stained-glass images of the dog listening to "his master's voice. " Phonograph recordings by the Victor Talking Machine Co. once captured the voice of opera singer Enrico Caruso and performances by classical musicians such as Sergei Rachmaninoff and orchestras conducted by Leopold Stokowski and Arturo Toscanini.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THAT BEAUTIFUL woman prowling around the junk yard, what could she be looking for? Or rooting in trash bins. Or just ransacking the urban environment for the castoffs of a reckless society. It would have been the artist Dina Wind, looking for discarded objects that she could fashion into the installations that made her one of Philadelphia's more interesting artists. She took old car fenders and other auto castoffs, as well as tools - hammers, saws, pliers, shears and the like - and welded them into shapes and contours that the motorists who once drove the cars and the workers who once wielded the tools wouldn't have recognized.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Take 100 Philadelphians drawn from every age group, ethnicity, and neighborhood, put them on a theater stage, and have them share stories about their lives. Sheer madness? Pure cacophony? Try a piece of cutting-edge theater. And a fascinating one at that. Called 100% Philadelphia , the FringeArts production will stage three performances, Friday through Sunday, at Temple Performing Arts Center. And yes, each will be an evening of storytelling, show-and-tells, and audience Q&As featuring 100 ordinary Philadelphians ranging in age from 2 months to 81 years.
NEWS
September 16, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dina Wind, 76, of Gladwyne, a sculptor and longtime patron of the arts in the United States and Israel, died Tuesday, Sept. 9, of ovarian cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Mrs. Wind juggled roles as artist and art patron, board member and consumer of cultural offerings, advocate of education and lifelong student, matriarch, and business person, and citizen of Israel and the United States. She led a busy, productive life. As a sculptor, she worked primarily in scrap metal, welding items like car bumpers and old farm tools into what she saw as three-dimensional drawings in the air. Though Mrs. Wind was best known for her sculpture, she also did painting, paper creations, and installations that were shown in 14 shows at two venues - the Viridian Gallery in New York, and the Nexus Gallery in Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2014 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Plant radish seeds now for fall crop. Radish is a very easy edible root crop to grow. It's not only one of the first vegetables to emerge in the spring, but by planting seeds by Labor Day, it can extend the veggie garden season. If you don't have leftover seed, look for discounted seeds at your local hardware or garden center. You can grow a typical red radish like 'Cherry Belle' - which I've grown in the past but found a bit too hot - or milder daikon or oriental radish that has long, white roots, and is often used in Asian-inspired cooking.
NEWS
August 17, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing on her 55-foot-tall sculpture at the tip of a spit of land on the Delaware at Washington Avenue, artist Jody Pinto peered down the river and thought of her father and grandparents arriving at the same spot from Italy nearly a century ago. The sculpture, entitled Land Buoy , a silver spire with a spiral staircase wrapped around it, is the focal point of Washington Avenue Pier, a new park, which opened Friday morning where a million European...
TRAVEL
March 17, 2014 | By John Rosenberg, For The Inquirer
BOGOTA, Colombia - As a globe-trotting adult, I've tended to err on the side of caution and have learned to approach overly novel attractions with a great deal of hesitation. Such was the case on a recent visit to Bogota, Colombia, when against all restraint I kept thumbing back to a dog-eared page in the guidebook referencing a so-called Salt Cathedral of Zipaquira, situated in an underground salt mine about 30 miles north of the capital. To prompt myself into finally hazarding Bogota's paralytic traffic so as to discover if the cathedral was worth its salt as a destination, I first had to channel a bit of Clark Griswold, goading his kids into the family car to make time to see the world's second-largest ball of twine as they made their way to Wally World.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just in time for Valentine's Day, Mayor Nutter and City Council President Darrell L. Clarke came to an agreement on the renovation of John F. Kennedy Plaza, better known to skateboarders, lunching office workers, tourists, and bridal parties as LOVE Park. There had been a fierce debate about its fate, but one thing had never been in dispute: The LOVE sculpture would stay. After all, the sculpture - based on a distinctive, stacked composition created by Robert Indiana 50 years ago - is practically the unofficial logo of Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 5, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
As shivering but curious passersby stopped to watch, holding up scarves to shield their faces from below-freezing winds, Kevin Gregory lifted a 10-pound Eagles helmet made of ice onto a clear, frozen podium. "Couldn't have asked for better weather - except for the sun," said Gregory, founder of Ice Concepts and the Eagles' unofficial go-to ice sculptor, on the 15-degree morning Friday. Gregory, 45, has been carving ice since 1994, most of that time with his business partner, Antonio Young.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Katie Grinnan's interactive sculpture For Your Information , the putative star of her show at the Print Center, "Katie Grinnan: Three Headed Lady," is still developing - and you can be part of its evolution by browsing on its computer (recipes, You-Tube videos, selfies, whatever), printing your contribution (yes, there's a printer, too), then clipping your papers together and filing them (real, old-fashioned folders hang on hinged compartments next to the seats). Grinnan's growing knowledge center has the best of intentions: She wants it to reveal "the nuances that are missed through computer interactions" and to "slow people down and focus on the way thought patterns emerge.
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