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Sculpture Park

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2006 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
There is no better time than summer to explore sculpture parks, and the Abington Art Center has one of the more abundantly natural ones around. Yes, there are manicured lawns graced by works by such well-known sculptors as Ursula von Rydingsvard, but you will also come across sculptures in its woodlands, all of which are close to trails. The park's sculpture tends toward organic and natural forms - von Rydingsvard's included - not the minimal or hard-edged, which sets it apart from most other sculpture parks.
NEWS
July 9, 1992 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The Johnson Atelier in Mercerville, N.J., a fine-art foundry that produces cast metal sculpture, has inaugurated an exhibition program for large outdoor pieces in a new 16-acre park called "Grounds for Sculpture. " The park, behind the atelier on the site of the former New Jersey state fairgrounds just east of Trenton, was developed over the last three years in cooperation with the Atlantic Foundation of Princeton. Both the atelier and the foundation are the creations of Johnson & Johnson heir J. Seward Johnson Jr., also known as a sculptor of "real-as-life" bronzes.
FOOD
March 19, 2000 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When they say "life is a work in progress," they probably are thinking about J. Seward Johnson Jr., the noted realist sculptor and millionaire. Once a sculpture is set in bronze, usually, it is finished. But not to Johnson. Johnson fiddles with the work's environment. Eight years ago, he set up Grounds for Sculpture - a lushly landscaped sculpture park housing 130 large pieces of his own and of others - near an industrial park outside Trenton. A fine setting, but not quite enough of a destination, even with free admission.
NEWS
September 9, 1990 | By Steve Gelsi, Special to The Inquirer
Wallace Township supervisors on Wednesday directed a Main Line developer to take up a proposal for a 70-acre sculpture park at Cornog Quarry with the Planning Commission. Rod Russell-Ides of Peter Recchi & Sons in Wayne, which wants to convert the idle quarry into a $10 million sculpture park with man-made waterfalls, rainbows, an amphitheater and other attractions, plans to present a sketch plan for the project at a Planning Commission meeting on Wednesday. It is there that the developer and officials must begin to figure out a way to fit his plans into the township's zoning laws or how to modify the zoning laws to accommodate a large sculpture garden, supervisors said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2007 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
The green expanse at the bottom of the Abington Art Center's dramatically sweeping lawn might seem the site of choice for outdoor sculptures, but not all sculptures call for maximum visibility. Moreover, the artists who are invited to participate in the center's Sculpture Park exhibitions seem to be increasingly drawn to what's beyond the grass: a surprisingly sizeable, untouched woodland with winding paths. The light is dappled and mysterious; the quiet, broken only by birds and crickets, is profound.
NEWS
October 12, 2001 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
When art museums expand, as many have recently, they typically add a wing. The Delaware Art Museum is putting a novel spin on that familiar scenario: To grow substantially while achieving architectural harmony, it's not only adding but subtracting. The museum, which specializes in American art and illustration, announced yesterday that it would begin construction next summer on a complex architectural design that would dramatically reconfigure its facility on Kentmere Parkway. Two wings will be added, but one older one will be subtracted and another, built in 1987, will be altered.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1993 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Grounds for Sculpture, a 22-acre outdoor sculpture park behind the Johnson Atelier in Hamilton, N.J., just east of Trenton, has evolved significantly since it opened last summer. The landscaping has grown in, so the park looks much less raw. A new concrete structure provides placements for wall-mounted pieces. But the most obvious improvement is a 10,000-square-foot, glass-walled indoor gallery, for smaller sculptures and those that can't take the weather. The park occupies the site of the former state fairgrounds, and the pavilion, which serves as the park entrance, is a transformed fairgrounds building with a gracefully curved green roof.
NEWS
June 25, 1995 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In nearby Concord is the wooden span immortalized by Ralph Waldo Emerson as "The rude bridge that arched the flood," where farmers began the American Revolution by firing "the shot heard round the world" against British troops advancing from Boston. That bridge - or at least a facsimile of it - is a gem even in Concord's rich lode of historic and literary treasures. They include the study where Emerson most likely penned his familiar stanza; the homes of novelists Nathaniel Hawthorne and Louisa May Alcott; and the Walden Pond made famous by Henry David Thoreau.
NEWS
November 5, 2004 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The effort to create an Alexander Calder Museum on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, which has been proceeding incrementally for several years, received a major psychological boost yesterday with the opening of a new display of Calder sculptures on the proposed museum site. The two-acre plot across from the Rodin Museum has been converted to a temporary Calder sculpture park with the placement of 10 works fabricated from sheet steel and painted black. They join a 19-foot-tall standing mobile called Ordinary, which was placed at the 22d Street corner of the site in May 2002.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | Edith Newhall
Every so often Works on Paper Gallery sheds its somewhat staid personality as a purveyor of prints and drawings by blue-chip contemporary artists, and the change is so abrupt — so seemingly out of nowhere — that it always makes me smile. It turns out that Evan Slepian, the gallery's owner, fell under under the spell of street art four years ago and will probably continue his presentations of urban artists he admires. The latest to be given the privilege of reinventing the gallery's main space is Then One, an artist, designer, illustrator, and muralist who lives in northern New Jersey.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Only two weeks remain to see one of the most sublime exhibitions of the fall season. "Winifred Lutz: Between Perception and Definition," the first large survey of the works of Lutz, a Philadelphia-based artist, has the entire Abington Art Center to itself and also includes the poetic site-specific outdoor installations she has been making in the center's sculpture park since 1992. At first, the indoor component of the survey appears to be one large multipart work consisting of groupings of natural objects and ones made by Lutz.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | Edith Newhall
Every so often Works on Paper Gallery sheds its somewhat staid personality as a purveyor of prints and drawings by blue-chip contemporary artists, and the change is so abrupt — so seemingly out of nowhere — that it always makes me smile. It turns out that Evan Slepian, the gallery's owner, fell under under the spell of street art four years ago and will probably continue his presentations of urban artists he admires. The latest to be given the privilege of reinventing the gallery's main space is Then One, an artist, designer, illustrator, and muralist who lives in northern New Jersey.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2009 | By Victoria Donohoe FOR THE INQUIRER
Amid the fast pace of gallery exhibits, the Abington Art Center is providing a welcome period of stock-taking. The occasion is the center's 70th anniversary year, highlighted in a special exhibit, "Forever Young. " The display celebrates seven decades of activity by featuring the work of 26 regional artists linked with the art center, as exhibitors or teachers, during the last 20 years, some now enjoying considerable recognition. They include Katie Adams, Astrid Bowlby, Frank Bramblett, Steven Donegan, Ron Klein, Blaise Tobia, Sarah Van Keuren, and Chris Zmijewski - familiar artists all. Historic content and the center's own history are especially important here.
NEWS
September 25, 2007 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
LOVE Park has figured in city founder William Penn's vision, city planner Edmund Bacon's college thesis, architect Vincent Kling's blueprints, and skateboarder Tony Hawk's video game. Visitors come from all over the world to see Robert Indiana's sculptural ode to the world's greatest four-letter word. The original-thinkers pose for snapshots in the open middle of it, their hands raised as if they're holding it up with their remarkably un-Atlas-like arms. Yes, that little park in the grand shadow of City Hall is a site of incalculable import.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2007 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
The green expanse at the bottom of the Abington Art Center's dramatically sweeping lawn might seem the site of choice for outdoor sculptures, but not all sculptures call for maximum visibility. Moreover, the artists who are invited to participate in the center's Sculpture Park exhibitions seem to be increasingly drawn to what's beyond the grass: a surprisingly sizeable, untouched woodland with winding paths. The light is dappled and mysterious; the quiet, broken only by birds and crickets, is profound.
NEWS
June 23, 2007 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
It was one of those heart-stopping moments, a moment when disaster hangs on a delicate loop of rope or a hand on a lever. But what could be controlled was controlled. The physics, the workers, the location were set. The temperamental forklift was up and running. The cranes were humming. Sunlight washed over the crew of a dozen, and twice that many onlookers. Sculptor Mark di Suvero, apprehensive, 30 feet in the air, swung the forklift around and then slowly down; as he did, a massive crane lifted three tons of red-orange steel and gently, guided by five straining workers on the ground, moved it slowly into place.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2006 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
There is no better time than summer to explore sculpture parks, and the Abington Art Center has one of the more abundantly natural ones around. Yes, there are manicured lawns graced by works by such well-known sculptors as Ursula von Rydingsvard, but you will also come across sculptures in its woodlands, all of which are close to trails. The park's sculpture tends toward organic and natural forms - von Rydingsvard's included - not the minimal or hard-edged, which sets it apart from most other sculpture parks.
NEWS
November 5, 2004 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The effort to create an Alexander Calder Museum on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, which has been proceeding incrementally for several years, received a major psychological boost yesterday with the opening of a new display of Calder sculptures on the proposed museum site. The two-acre plot across from the Rodin Museum has been converted to a temporary Calder sculpture park with the placement of 10 works fabricated from sheet steel and painted black. They join a 19-foot-tall standing mobile called Ordinary, which was placed at the 22d Street corner of the site in May 2002.
NEWS
April 2, 2002
"It was the Age of Optimism, a period when Americans were convinced in their hearts that all things were not only possible to accomplish, but that they were things of which to be proud. . . . " "The Great Bridge," the story of the 1883 building of the Brooklyn Bridge. Perhaps it is the age of pessimism in this spring of 2002, considering the world's precarious condition, and, locally, Philadelphia's 22 futile years trying to fill the vacant corner at Eighth and Market Streets.
NEWS
October 12, 2001 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
When art museums expand, as many have recently, they typically add a wing. The Delaware Art Museum is putting a novel spin on that familiar scenario: To grow substantially while achieving architectural harmony, it's not only adding but subtracting. The museum, which specializes in American art and illustration, announced yesterday that it would begin construction next summer on a complex architectural design that would dramatically reconfigure its facility on Kentmere Parkway. Two wings will be added, but one older one will be subtracted and another, built in 1987, will be altered.
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