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Sculpture

NEWS
July 13, 2005 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A sculpture of a baby angel chopped from a wall outside a Center City building over the weekend was back home yesterday, intact and waiting to be cemented back in place. "The contractors will be here to put it back in," said an ecstatic Greg Lingham, maintenance mechanic at the National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees District 1199C building at 1319 Locust St. The cherub, clutching two dolphins, was believed taken from there sometime late Sunday afternoon and was recovered Monday night.
LIVING
October 25, 2002 | By Marty Ross FOR THE INQUIRER
Art isn't just something you hang on the walls in your living room. It also belongs in the garden - in the dappled light under the trees, on a sweep of lawn, or tucked into a quiet corner among the ferns. A successful collaboration between art and nature can turn a backyard into a private gallery, open to the changing seasons and to as many interpretations as the Mona Lisa. "Placing a man-made object in the landscape disturbs the sense that one is in a place of nature," says Susan Cohen, a landscape architect in Greenwich, Conn.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1993 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Clothing as costume is a long-established concept. We understand that clothing not only keeps us warm, preserves our modesty and enhances our appearance; it allows us to express fantasies and desires through the way we adorn ourselves. Clothing as sculpture is a more recent idea. In its most common manifestation, clothing-sculpture often is described as "wearable art," a term originally devised to add cachet to garments made by artists or artisans. In exhibitions at the Painted Bride Art Center and the Borowsky Gallery at the Gershman Y, clothing as sculpture is carried well beyond the chic and practical.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1992 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
Choreographer Garth Fagan sees in the sculpture of Martin Puryear all the qualities he aspires to in his own dances, and that is why he asked the sculptor to design the sets for his full-evening work Griot New York. The fruit of their collaboration will come tonight through Saturday at the Great Stairway of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, where a retrospective of Puryear's sculptures is on display through January 3. Fagan said in a telephone interview that he feels particularly simpatico with Puryear's work because "we both draw from classical concerns and primal concerns.
NEWS
December 7, 1986 | By Howard Gensler, Special to The Inquirer
As a few dozen Episcopal Academy middle schoolers noisily swarmed around the newly posted honor rolls Tuesday, sculptor Joseph J. Greenberg and two assistants quietly mounted his newest creation 20 yards away in the school's main lobby. Neither group seemed aware of the other. But when Greenberg's bronze-covered modernist interpretation of a boy reading was standing and centered, students began to mill around and whisper among themselves. Some wondered what the 5-foot-high piece was. Many recognized it as a larger version of the maquette that was in the lobby last year.
NEWS
March 4, 2001 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The intriguing thing about a two-person exhibit titled "Fur and Steel" at the Salon Des Amis Gallery is not necessarily its focus on steel sculpture and paintings of felines. The interest is in the intense focus that two young Malvern artists, painter Katie Gillespie and sculptor Mark Washburn, have achieved early in their careers. Gillespie's paintings vary widely in texture and composition, but not because she's an amateur in search of a style. She likes to experiment with paint texture by painting over canvases or going for a thick paint buildup on wood panels.
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Nineteenth-century taste held that high-minded sculpture could be created only from "noble" materials such as bronze and marble. Artists in the 20th century have so emphatically refuted that idea that today, serious sculptors are more likely to reject the pretensions such materials imply. Karen Stone's mixed-media sculptures proceed from kitsch, even revel in it. Yet they're composed with such sensitivity and style that they effortlessly evoke the kind of sentiments - elevated sentiments, not mawkish ones - associated with the best pre-modern sculpture.
NEWS
August 17, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing on her 55-foot-tall sculpture at the tip of a spit of land on the Delaware at Washington Avenue, artist Jody Pinto peered down the river and thought of her father and grandparents arriving at the same spot from Italy nearly a century ago. The sculpture, entitled Land Buoy , a silver spire with a spiral staircase wrapped around it, is the focal point of Washington Avenue Pier, a new park, which opened Friday morning where a million European...
NEWS
December 11, 1992 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In another "smash and grab" incident, an award-winning sculpture valued at $5,000 was stolen from an Old City art gallery. The piece, by Arlene L. Borow of Philadelphia, is a realistic polychromed bronze sculpture, about 24 inches by 16 inches, of a man reading a book in an easy chair. Borow said she called it Harry, after its model, the late Harry Vulk of Margate, N.J., a friend of hers. "He was a very special person, and it was a very special sculpture," she said. In 1989, the sculpture won the grand prize at the annual Atlantic City Boardwalk show and a gold medal in the annual competition of the Knickerbocker Artists of New York.
NEWS
January 11, 2007 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
A towering red sculpture by Mark di Suvero - known throughout the world for his fanciful steel I-beam constructions - has been approved by the Fairmount Park Commission for installation in a grassy area near the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Placement of the 40-foot-high work, titled Iroquois and currently on long-term loan to the Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park in Grand Rapids, Mich., still must be approved by the city Art Commission. If that panel gives its blessing, Iroquois could be installed across from Eakins Oval in the shadow of the Philadelphian condo building - and across the roadway from Rocky - by spring.
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