FEATURED ARTICLES
REAL_ESTATE
March 10, 1989 | By Melissa Dribben, Special to The Inquirer
THE SHIRES AT ENGLISH CREEK Egg Harbor Township, Atlantic County 609-641-8316 The Shires at English Creek is 15 minutes from the beaches on the Atlantic. The 176-house development is about the same distance from the casinos at Atlantic City. Residents of the Shires would have a considerable commute to Philadelphia, but come summer when the sea breezes beckon, the proximity to heat relief might make the rest of the year's driving worth the effort. The development's motto is, "Life the way it was meant to be. " Forty-nine souls have bought in and decided it's the way their lives were meant to be, at least for the time being.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | Special to The Inquirer / BOB WILLIAMS
Slides of underwater scenes set the stage and "Down by the Sea" was the theme for a talent show put on by Caln Elementary School students in Caln Township. Show director Linda Peppelman guided 45 students in various grades through their performances Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1998 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
How do you say dread in French? Francois Ozon's See the Sea, set on a sun-bleached Biscay island where a young English mother and her infant daughter encounter a brooding vagabond, practically palpitates with foreboding. An incredibly agile and unsettling piece of work, See the Sea taps into our unconscious fears and fantasies in a way very few films, or filmmakers, manage. Ozon, 31, shows in his just-under-an-hour See the Sea and its 15-minute companion piece A Summer Dress (also situated amid the rustling pines and hot sands of an idyllic beach setting)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1997 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
As a plot, the one about the gold digger and the romantic who go out together hunting for mates was probably gathering dust in the Jurassic period. But it's still fun, and when, as in Out to Sea, it stars Walter Matthau and Jack Lemmon, it's also quite winning. Though the sound of septuagenarians swearing is not my idea of ha-ha, the spectacle of Matthau and Lemmon as the Golden Guys is. In what amounts to a full-employment act for performers of a certain age, the guys from grumpus are joined by Gloria DeHaven, Hal Linden, Donald O'Connor, and Elaine Stritch.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1988 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Sounds like potboiler fiction: A mother who abandoned her child encounters the girl 12 years later. But unlike potboiler fiction, Gillian Armstrong's unforgettable High Tide is no schmaltz-larded tribute to mother love, no Stella Dallas offering on the altar of motherly self-sacrifice. High Tide breaks taboo by probing the depths of maternal ambivalence with a fearlessness and lack of sentimentality that ranks the film with such novels as Sue Miller's The Good Mother and Doris Lessing's The Fifth Child.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | By Ashley Halsey 3d, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not since Nelson triumphed at Trafalgar have sails at sea captured so much attention around the world. Only recently, muscular men drove powerful yachts through the towering seas of the Indian Ocean off Fremantle, Australia, united in a quest that pitted them against one another - the lust for that ornate hunk of silver called the America's Cup. But as corporate sponsors spent millions to trade off this combat at sea, the true lure of...
NEWS
February 3, 2002 | By John Maxtone-Graham FOR THE INQUIRER
Romance is in plentiful supply aboard ship and always has been. Years ago, when unattached British women sailed out to India, their romantic quests began the moment they embarked. Old hands referred to them disparagingly as "the fishing fleet," so determined were they to snare a husband. In our own times, there is something overwhelmingly seductive about finding yourself in an exhilarating new environment, detached from habitual surroundings while being pampered, entertained, and fed to distraction.
NEWS
February 7, 1998 | Inquirer photographs by John Costello
In Sea Isle City, the storm left some surreal illustrations of its power. Whatever sand that the storm didn't take out to sea, it seems to have left in preposterous places. Losses in the city alone could total more than $10 million, officials said.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
In the way people speak of "pre-Beatles rock," they might also describe the 1959 Venezuelan film Araya as a "pre-PBS documentary. " Before the invention of public television nonfiction in which talking heads argue the pros and cons and the director is telling you what to think, there were documentaries with images that broke your heart. One such film is Luis Bunuel's Land Without Bread (1932), a possible inspiration for Margot Benacerraf's Araya, which could be called Land Without Vegetation.
NEWS
December 5, 2004 | By Donna Gentile O'Donnell FOR THE INQUIRER
When your first criterion for a vacation is access to horseback riding, captivating circumstances and people will almost certainly find you. Like hacking through the Galisteo Basin in New Mexico with Babay, the French cowgirl. Or cantering on the beaches of Porto Santo, an island near Madeira, with my husband, Bob, and our "guide," Pedro - a barefoot, bareback-riding teenager, who spoke only five words of English, one of which was "gallop. " Horse people will tell you that there's nothing like horses, and the connection that occurs between four-footed and two-footed sentient beings.
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TRAVEL
July 27, 2015 | By Marianne Grieco, For The Inquirer
My husband and I are on a pilgrimage throughout sunny Italy to visit the lands of our forefathers. Since our journey takes us to the remote towns of Gioiosa Marea in Sicily and Badolato in Calabria, we find it necessary to rent the Opel wagon that will be our faithful companion for the duration of this yet-unexplored territory. Today, we set out to visit Badolato. The Autostrada takes us to Messina, Sicily, and the ferry that crosses the Straits of Messina to Reggio Calabria. Armed with GPS maps of Italy, tablet, and a smartphone, we venture into the land of Calabria, searching for the new road that will take us from Tyrrhenian shores to those of the Ionian Sea. All is fine until we come upon the popular rotunda , or roundabout, where the GPS goes crazy after we make a supposedly wrong turn.
NEWS
July 19, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
People here seem to love the Shore. But for a relative newcomer to Philadelphia, the words Jersey Shore evoke specific images: Hurricane Sandy-battered towns, absurd MTV characters, miles of standstill traffic, a failing casino town. So why do friends and colleagues continuously go down the Shore, to family summer homes, hotels, rented beach houses? What incredible activities do they find there? What is it they're seeking? It couldn't be just sand and surf, right? Jersey's beaches are probably like any other: sand getting everywhere, sun beating down, waves crashing around, and that universal smell.
FOOD
July 17, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Inside the sweltering heat of a greenhouse near the Jersey Shore, where the afternoon summer temperatures can hit 160 degrees, a bit of the Atlantic Ocean is rapidly transforming before our eyes into one of civilization's oldest treasures. "I'm literally swimming in salt," says Derrek Thomas, 43, leading us between the 2,000-gallon retention pools that line the new salt house he and his partner, chef Lucas Manteca, 38, built on Thomas' Windy Acres farm in Ocean View. "I can't get water fast enough.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEA ISLE CITY, N.J. - Call this summer drama 50 shades of yellow. And then gray. And back to yellow again. In this overpopulated beach town, the summer parking battles are being fought with cans of paint. And a parade of trips to Municipal Court. Hey, the accused are arguing, this is how it's always been done in Sea Isle: You paint the strip of the curb in front of your house yellow to make sure cars don't block your driveway, or maybe even you make it a little longer to save a space.
NEWS
July 1, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEA ISLE CITY, N.J. - Residents and vacationers traveling between Sea Isle City and Avalon were elated Friday evening when the Townsends Inlet Bridge reopened after five months of construction, said Diane Wieland, director of the Cape May County tourism department. "We're hearing people are very happy," Wieland said. And it's just "in time for the Fourth of July. " While the bridge was under repair, motorists had to take the Garden State Parkway or Route 9 - both of which can add about 10 miles each way - to get back and forth from the neighboring Shore towns.
NEWS
May 14, 2015
IN PAST City Council races, we've always been impressed with the wide variety of candidates that come up from the neighborhoods and community activism, "regular joes" who are dedicated to public service. These contenders are not always the best qualified, but their runs represent the essence of democracy - and a refreshing counterpoint to a City Council that has often represented political dynasties as much as, if not more than, the people's business. This time around, the large slate for at-large Council seats is impressive for a different reason: They represent a level of professional accomplishment in law, business and education that could bring a strong upgrade to the city's legislative body.
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cheryle Goldberg, 69, an almost 37-year survivor, has walked in every one of the 25 Philadelphia breast cancer walks on Mother's Day. In honor of her longevity - and the event's 25th anniversary - on Sunday, she led the emotional and ceremonial survivors' parade down the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. What made the day most significant for the Warminster woman - diagnosed in 1978, when for so many a diagnosis was a death sentence -...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Big Hero 6 , which last month was graced with an Oscar for best animated feature, is a very good film. I'd never dream of denigrating the witty Disney 3D picture, which had so much fun with its cast of Marvel Comics heroes. But did it deserve to beat out some of this year's other nominees - say, the Irish musical fantasy The Song of the Sea ? One of this year's best films - live-action or animated - the Irish family picture is a transcendent work of art that's almost wasted on kids.
TRAVEL
March 1, 2015 | By Si Liberman, For The Inquirer
  Lee Wachtstetter, an 86-year-old Florida widow, took her daughter's advice. She sold her five bedroom Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-area home on 10 acres and became a permanent luxury cruise ship resident after her husband died. Mama Lee, as she's known aboard the 11-year-old Crystal Serenity, has been living on the luxe 1,070-passenger vessel longer than most of its 655 crew members - nearly seven years. "My husband introduced me to cruising," she recalled. "Mason was a banker and real estate appraiser and taught me to love cruising.
NEWS
February 11, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Off the Jersey Shore, where the continental shelf plummets into the deep sea, scientists have been exploring vast canyons, discovering far below the surface a trove of deep-sea corals as colorful and exciting as their warm-water cousins. The fragile formations include more than 40 species of corals, some previously undiscovered. Some are massed in forests; others jut out from current-swept canyon walls. Given the growth rates of coral, some are thought to be thousands of years old. The discoveries, made in recent summers all along the East Coast thanks in part to new technology, are prompting fisheries managers to consider restricting commercial fishing in portions of this dark, cold, and eerily beautiful undersea world.
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