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April 29, 2011
Q: Is sea salt a healthier option than regular table salt? A: Both sea salt and table salt are composed of sodium and chloride. Sodium is crucial to good health. It helps your body maintain a balance of fluids, keeps the nervous system running smoothly and influences muscle movement. But too much can cause high blood pressure. Aim to consume no more than the 2,300-milligram daily limit recommended by the American Heart Association. All salts add sodium to your diet. A teaspoon of a coarse variety, however, contributes slightly less than the same amount of the finer table salt.
FOOD
July 24, 2015 | Samantha Melamed
Hug a lemon Many recipes call for half a lemon, or, say, half an onion. What happens to the other half? That's between you and the unseemly, plastic-wrap-strewn back of your refrigerator. A better solution is now available: silicone Food Huggers, available in a range of sizes to put the wraps on a variety of produce.  - S.M. Food Huggers, $9.99 for a four-pack at  Foodhuggers.com .   A creamy butter sans dairy and nuts A new peanut-butter alternative is on the market, and it's made in Lancaster.
FOOD
October 30, 2015 | Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
A better butter  Just as Italians debate the subtleties of their finest olive oils, the French obsess over butters. One of my longtime favorites, Echiré, has been the butter gold standard at Bibou, and the equally wonderful Pamplie (with sea salt) lathers the baguettes at sister restaurant Le Chéri. But a new contender has arrived at Di Bruno Bros. in a big wicker basket from one of France's rock-star cheese mongers, Rodolphe Le Meunier. This "beurre de baratte" - churned in the old-school way as opposed to modern centrifuge methods - isn't le bonmarché at $12.99 a pound.
NEWS
April 19, 2012
For the beets: 4 medium yellow beets 1 to 2 teaspoons olive oil A few pinches sea salt 2 tablespoons agave nectar For the risotto: 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon diced ginger 1 teaspoon diced garlic 1 cup sliced shiitake mushroom caps 2 cups arborio rice Approximately 1 to 2 teaspoons sea salt, to taste 5 cups water 1 cup soy or almond milk 1/4 cup...
FOOD
February 21, 2008
Let Craig LaBan have all the fun with diver scallops, as he did in this space last week? Another great two-scallop appetizer ($11) comes off the stove of Mike Stollenwerk at Little Fish. He whips up a cauliflower gratin of bechamel and fontina cheese, sears the salted-and-peppered scallops, and plates them atop a smudge of slightly sweet raisin emulsion made of sherry wine vinegar and oil. A dusting of sea salt at the very last moment gives the scallops a special crunch.
FOOD
April 11, 2013
Makes a generous 11/4 cups 1/3 cup plus 2 tablespoons    extra-virgin olive oil 1 cup raw unsalted cashews 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin 1/2 teaspoon chili powder 1/2 teaspoon sweet smoked paprika (pimento dulce) 1/2 jalapeno pepper, seeded and    coarsely chopped 3 tablespoons fresh lime juice 1/3 cup water 1 teaspoon coarse sea salt 1. Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a small skillet over medium-high heat until the oil shimmers.
FOOD
April 4, 2013
Makes 6 servings 1 pound lump or jumbo lump crabmeat 1/4 cup finely chopped flatleaf parsley 1 bunch scallions, roots trimmed, thinly sliced 3/4 cup fresh bread crumbs 2 large eggs 1/4 cup milk Pinch of cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce Fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 3 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 lemon, thinly sliced, for garnish ...
FOOD
August 11, 1996 | By Andrew Schloss, FOR THE INQUIRER
I am tasting salt for the first time. After years of coveting its crystalline crunch on pretzels, its salty flocking on popcorn and chips, I am here with several shakers and I'm tasting the stuff, straight. Kosher salt, iodized salt, free-flowing table salt, purified crystals of sea salt, potassium salt, reduced-sodium salt, pretzel salt, and several varieties of raw sea salt lie on plates across my kitchen counter. Some are as coarse as gravel, while others are powdery fine. They differ in color, moisture content, transparency, flavor, and, most surprisingly, aroma.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2007 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Campbell Soup Co.'s product lineup for this fall will have nearly 40 new or reformulated soups, including 14 using sea salt to reduce sodium, five Chunky Fully Loaded varieties with more meat, and - likely - the company's first organic soups, the Camden company said yesterday at a conference in Arizona. The plan to put sea salt in Campbell's soups sold in microwavable containers and other items comes as sales of the original 32 lower-sodium soups launched last year are projected to reach $300 million to $350 million in the current fiscal year, the company said.
NEWS
April 25, 2014
THE shagbark hickory, distinctive for its shedding bark, is a common tree in southeastern Pennsylvania. SHAGBARK HICKORY SYRUP 2 pounds shagbark hickory bark 2 cups granulated sugar Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Scrub bark thoroughly in clean water to remove debris. Break bark into roughly 8-inch pieces and place on a baking sheet. Toast bark until slightly brown and toasty smelling, about 25 minutes. Place bark in a large pot and add enough water to cover by one inch.
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TRAVEL
April 18, 2016 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
MODENA, Italy - As we ascended the winding stairs into the garret of Acetaia Giuseppe Giusti, a familiar musky grape aroma wafted over us, one that had we had previously associated with ancient wine cellars carved out of chalky loam. However, it was not wine we were going to taste, but another product of grapes, authentic Balsamico di Modena, the globally renowned vinegar that, in some cases, is so precious it is served via eyedropper. Modena is a city of contrasts. Two prominent buildings pierce the azure Italian sky; the 12th-century white-marble-clad cathedral and the racy, yellow curved roof of the Enzo Ferrari museum.
FOOD
March 4, 2016
Makes a generous 2 cups 1/2 teaspoon nigella seed (also called kalonji or black onion seed) 1/2 teaspoon cumin seed 1/2 teaspoon fennel seed 2 crisp green apples, such as Granny Smith Grated zest and juice of 1 lemon Generous pinch sugar, or as needed Pinch sea salt, or as needed 11/4 cups plain, low-fat Greek-style yogurt 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped mint 1. Lightly toast the nigella, cumin, and fennel...
FOOD
February 19, 2016
Makes 18 servings 1 pound of unsalted butter, softened 11/2 cups of sifted 10X or confectioner's sugar (Sifting is a must, due to massive lumpage) 4 cups of flour 21/2 teaspoons of sea salt 1. Beat the butter and sugar with a mixer until fluffy. Then, I prefer to mix in the flour and salt by hand. This will avoid over mixing, potentially creating a tough cookie. (We may desire that quality in a person, but not in our shortbread.) 2. Line a 9x13-inch pan with parchment paper, the baker's best friend, leaving an overhang to facilitate removing the baked product.
FOOD
October 30, 2015 | Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
A better butter  Just as Italians debate the subtleties of their finest olive oils, the French obsess over butters. One of my longtime favorites, Echiré, has been the butter gold standard at Bibou, and the equally wonderful Pamplie (with sea salt) lathers the baguettes at sister restaurant Le Chéri. But a new contender has arrived at Di Bruno Bros. in a big wicker basket from one of France's rock-star cheese mongers, Rodolphe Le Meunier. This "beurre de baratte" - churned in the old-school way as opposed to modern centrifuge methods - isn't le bonmarché at $12.99 a pound.
NEWS
October 2, 2015 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
Over the Top, an occasional series in the Philadelphia Daily News, features local dishes that are so ridiculously delicious, so awesomely sinful, so, well, over-the-top, that they're worth obsessing over.   Last weekend left many Philadelphians feeling quite virtuous. Time to fix all that, with a Salty Pimp ice-cream cone from South Street's Big Gay Ice Cream . Ever since the NYC-based biz opened its Philly store in late April, fans have been streaming in for cake cones drizzled with own-make dulce de leche, filled with 4.8 ounces of organic-cream vanilla soft serve that's injected with more dulce, sprinkled with sea salt, and dipped into an all-natural chocolate shell whose recipe includes a dash of deliciously burnt-tasting cayenne.
FOOD
July 24, 2015 | Samantha Melamed
Hug a lemon Many recipes call for half a lemon, or, say, half an onion. What happens to the other half? That's between you and the unseemly, plastic-wrap-strewn back of your refrigerator. A better solution is now available: silicone Food Huggers, available in a range of sizes to put the wraps on a variety of produce.  - S.M. Food Huggers, $9.99 for a four-pack at  Foodhuggers.com .   A creamy butter sans dairy and nuts A new peanut-butter alternative is on the market, and it's made in Lancaster.
FOOD
July 17, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Inside the sweltering heat of a greenhouse near the Jersey Shore, where the afternoon summer temperatures can hit 160 degrees, a bit of the Atlantic Ocean is rapidly transforming before our eyes into one of civilization's oldest treasures. "I'm literally swimming in salt," says Derrek Thomas, 43, leading us between the 2,000-gallon retention pools that line the new salt house he and his partner, chef Lucas Manteca, 38, built on Thomas' Windy Acres farm in Ocean View. "I can't get water fast enough.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | BY SUSAN SELASKY, Tribune News Service
IF YOU'RE growing your own or getting produce through a CSA, you've probably got the whole vegetable to consider. Using it all can yield more value and variation. Not only are stalks, stems and leaves tasty, but some have entirely different flavors than their more popular parts. Broccoli stalks are sweeter than their florets. Feathery carrot tops taste like herbs and can be used as such. Beet greens mellow when sauteed; raw, they can add a peppery flavor to salads. To gather the makings of a great vegetable stock, keep a plastic bag in the freezer to add vegetable scraps or unused pieces (broccoli stalks, onion pieces, carrots, celery ribs and leaves)
FOOD
February 13, 2015 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Want to show loved ones that they are worth a little extra effort? Handcrafted cards are nice, but on Valentine's Day, nothing is better than homemade treats. Who wouldn't be wooed by hand-dipped chocolates? Or reminded of fond affections with sugar cookie missives? Homemade confections are as perfect a gift for the teacher who cares for your child as they are for your mom or dad. And you can create an assortment of goodies just the way your sweetheart or friend or firstborn likes them best.
NEWS
December 5, 2014
MEAT and potatoes offer a hearty entry into the big-eating, rib-sticking world of chef Ben Ford.   STANDING RIB ROAST For the roast: One 7-bone standing prime rib roast (16 to 18 pounds), trimmed and tied 10 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened Kosher salt and fresh coarsely ground black pepper For the jus: 2 cups red wine 10 fresh thyme sprigs 2 fresh rosemary sprigs 2 cups veal or beef stock 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper To prepare the roast, remove it from the refrigerator 30 minutes prior to cooking time and preheat the oven to 450°F.
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