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NEWS
January 2, 2005 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The gigantic leatherback turtle shoveled black sand backward to cover her freshly deposited eggs, then paused to catch her breath before resuming the task, fulfilling the ancient imperative to produce a new generation. Epifanio Mualeri Biri gently approached the animal, which can weigh more than half a ton and whose powerful flippers can inflict a nasty blow. He extended a tape measure across the shell - 6 feet long and 3 1/2 feet wide. To Mualeri, handling this magnificent creature is all in a night's work.
NEWS
April 30, 1989 | By Nolan Walters, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Spotting a sea turtle - one of those lumbering, mossy throwbacks to the prehistoric past - swimming with strange ease just beneath the water's surface can be the high point of a beach vacation. But progress, pollution and predation make such sights less and less frequent. All five sea turtle species that ply America's coastal waters are on the endangered species list. And now, with new protective regulations scheduled to take effect tomorrow, an 11-year battle pitting the $500 million Gulf shrimping industry against protectors of the dwindling sea turtle population is flaring anew.
NEWS
July 9, 2004 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The mid-Atlantic Ocean should be closed to scallop fishing until researchers further study whether the boats' heavy steel dredges pose a danger to endangered and threatened sea turtles, an environmental group said yesterday in a court motion. In a preemptive strike just a week earlier, the fishing industry asked the federal government to require all boats from Long Island to Cape Hatteras, N.C., to install special chains that are designed to let scallops in, but keep turtles out. The two moves are the latest in a five-year-old battle over the $250 million Atlantic scallop industry, nearly $30 million of which comes ashore in New Jersey.
NEWS
January 14, 2013 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
He should have died. Twice. First, when he was born too weak to scramble from his sandy birthplace and scuttle to the sea. Rescued once, the tiny loggerhead sea turtle came down with pneumonia, which damaged his lungs. His hind fins didn't develop properly, making a swim to the ocean deep impossible. But with careful veterinary care, Ozzy survived. Now, the year-old loggerhead will be a star at Camden's Adventure Aquarium turtle exhibit, which opens Monday. The exhibit, called Turtles: Journey of Survival, features 19 turtle species that live in water, mud, and even sand.
NEWS
December 2, 1999 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tom Wilson, 54, a utility consultant, has spent years fighting the multinationals that have moved in to mine copper and gold in his home state of Wisconsin. This week, he used up his frequent-flier miles to come here and fight what he sees as a rising tide of global capitalism - by protesting the policies of the World Trade Organization. "What we're seeing is a control of world power by corporations," said the white-haired Wilson as he stood on a Seattle street corner yesterday in a yellow poncho printed with the words "Seattle '99, Protest of the Century.
NEWS
September 3, 2004 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fishing boats that dredge for scallops in the Mid-Atlantic accidentally killed or injured almost 460 threatened or endangered sea turtles last year, according to a new government estimate - far more than previously thought. A preliminary estimate released in February covered a smaller part of the ocean and pegged the number of killed or injured turtles at 28. Environmental groups already had called for a shutdown of the scallop fishery from North Carolina to Long Island until the problem could be studied further; the new estimate, dated Tuesday, prompted renewed cries of alarm yesterday.
NEWS
August 13, 1991 | By Vernon Loeb, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer staff writer Mark Jaffe contributed to this article
The giant leatherback turtle emerged from the pounding surf and slowly dragged herself onto the moonlit beach, sounding almost human as she grunted and swiped at the sand with her huge front flippers. Six feet long and about 850 pounds, the leatherback had come to lay her eggs, in what should have been a wondrous display of nature. But by the time her nesting ritual mercifully ended near dawn one morning recently, her vulnerable hours ashore had degenerated into an object lesson in why leatherbacks have become all but extinct at Rantau Abang, despite a highly touted conservation program.
TRAVEL
April 20, 2015 | By Gary Frisch, For The Inquirer
CANCUN, Mexico - For most sea turtles, crawling onto the beach at night to lay eggs is a risky proposition. Out of the water, they are achingly slow, ungainly . . . and vulnerable. But in tourist meccas where hotel sprawl has rendered the coastline a virtual Monopoly board of development with 24/7 hubbub, the annual trek onto the sand becomes all the more treacherous. Tourists, cameras in hand, camp out for a look at these massive tortugas, or worse, try to pet them or pose for pictures with them.
NEWS
June 18, 2010
THE EAGLES are about to start their new season, and I just can't wait for those hypocrites from PETA to show up and protest Michael Vick. Who finances these vultures to gain media attention? And with all the pelicans, fish and endangered sea turtles getting murdered by the BP oil spill, where are they? That's right, nowhere to be found. I rest my case. Ralph P. Goldsborough, Yeadon
NEWS
August 17, 2012
Doylestown police said Thursday that they had dropped charges against two teens who doodled on the street with chalk. Police Chief James Donnelly said that the drawings did not break the law, the Doylestown Intelligencer reported. He said Thursday that offending images would have to be "indelible and financially costly to remove. " Police had issued citations to Connor Logan, 18, and a 17-year-old friend this month for drawing a whale and sea turtles on a street downtown. Logan said he found the chalk in a parking lot and thought the drawings were "harmless.
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TRAVEL
July 20, 2015 | By Ellie Slott Fisher, For The Inquirer
Standing at an edge of the eastern Pacific Ocean on sand as white as the moon and as soft as cashmere, I spot scores of sea turtles treading water in mid-wave. They are waiting for the sun to set so they can safely come ashore and bury their eggs. But I won't see their amphibious landing, because like all humans, I must leave the island before dark. This is the Galapagos, and I am merely an interloper, a party crasher. Yet, those minutes I spend on the silky beach, my toes submerged in water the color of blue topaz, are some of the most memorable in my life.
TRAVEL
April 20, 2015 | By Gary Frisch, For The Inquirer
CANCUN, Mexico - For most sea turtles, crawling onto the beach at night to lay eggs is a risky proposition. Out of the water, they are achingly slow, ungainly . . . and vulnerable. But in tourist meccas where hotel sprawl has rendered the coastline a virtual Monopoly board of development with 24/7 hubbub, the annual trek onto the sand becomes all the more treacherous. Tourists, cameras in hand, camp out for a look at these massive tortugas, or worse, try to pet them or pose for pictures with them.
TRAVEL
December 29, 2014 | By Eric Vohr, For The Inquirer
Unspoiled white-sand beaches, turquoise-blue waters, frolicking green sea turtles, and bays, lagoons, and reefs so idyllic you have to pinch yourself just to make sure they're real - the Grenadines are one of the most spectacular sailing destinations in the world. In this archipelago of sun-splashed Caribbean islands that stretch from Grenada to St. Vincent, there's so much to explore that it would take a lifetime to truly appreciate it all. With only two weeks and a chartered sailboat, my photographer and I did our best to get a taste of this fabled paradise.
TRAVEL
May 19, 2013 | By Lisa Loeb, For The Inquirer
At last, I'm zooming in on my dream. The island appears through the window just as the sun begins its descent. Tropical paradise is within my reach. Back up 25 years: With the birth of my daughter, my husband and I had chosen a dreamy Hawaiian name. It was chosen with karmic intentions, a name from paradise, and a name full of warm sun, free breezes . . . and of the ocean. We hoped the name would be a talisman for a good life, and we agreed the name was as beautiful as she was - Laina.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Come out of your shell this weekend and learn how turtles have been able to adapt and survive since prehistoric times at Adventure Aquarium's newest exhibit "Turtles: Journey of Survival. " On display through March 24, the exhibit features more than 20 species of land and sea turtles from around the globe. Each day activities will educate about their biology, evolution, and living habitats. At "The Journey of Five Turtles," a daily interactive show in the Ocean Realm Dive Theater, visitors can learn about vulnerable species and meet Loggerhead Bob; Ozzy, a 3-month-old hatchling; and green sea turtles Old Green and Stitches.
NEWS
January 14, 2013 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
He should have died. Twice. First, when he was born too weak to scramble from his sandy birthplace and scuttle to the sea. Rescued once, the tiny loggerhead sea turtle came down with pneumonia, which damaged his lungs. His hind fins didn't develop properly, making a swim to the ocean deep impossible. But with careful veterinary care, Ozzy survived. Now, the year-old loggerhead will be a star at Camden's Adventure Aquarium turtle exhibit, which opens Monday. The exhibit, called Turtles: Journey of Survival, features 19 turtle species that live in water, mud, and even sand.
NEWS
December 9, 2012
Fla.'s Crist is Democrat now TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - Former Florida Gov. Charlie Crist, who was elected the state's chief executive as a Republican and then ran unsuccessfully for the U.S. Senate as an independent, announced on Twitter that he's switching to the Democratic Party. He cited the Republican Party's shift to the right on a range of issues, including immigration, education, and the environment. The announcement Friday night fanned speculation that he would seek to get his old job from Republican Gov. Rick Scott in 2014.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
The searchlights over the Benjamin Franklin Parkway have gone dark. The three-week Open Air show by Montreal artist Rafael Lozano-Hemmer is packing up. But the issue of light pollution that simmered throughout is still with us. It is of concern not only to astronomers, but to others who feel the bejeweled dark sky is an important part of living on Earth and being human. The lofty realm has inspired us to write poetry, compose music, ponder the existence of God, and fall in love.
NEWS
August 17, 2012
Doylestown police said Thursday that they had dropped charges against two teens who doodled on the street with chalk. Police Chief James Donnelly said that the drawings did not break the law, the Doylestown Intelligencer reported. He said Thursday that offending images would have to be "indelible and financially costly to remove. " Police had issued citations to Connor Logan, 18, and a 17-year-old friend this month for drawing a whale and sea turtles on a street downtown. Logan said he found the chalk in a parking lot and thought the drawings were "harmless.
NEWS
June 23, 2012 | By Molly Murray, WILMINGTON NEWS JOURNAL
LEWES, Del. - In late May and June, five sea turtles washed ashore on Delaware's beaches. Then, over last weekend, six more dead turtles were found. Along New Jersey beaches, four dead sea turtles washed in on Sunday alone. And along the Virginia coast, the number of dead turtles was abnormally high during May. State and federal officials who monitor sea turtle populations said they do not know if the numbers indicate any problem. "This time of year, turtles are migrating," said Edna Stetzer, a Delaware biologist.
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