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Sealant

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NEWS
August 17, 2006 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
PennDot officials, still puzzled by a defective road sealant that caused hours-long backups for morning commuters last week in Montgomery County, have switched to a more reliable but pricier alternative. On Aug. 8, southbound traffic on Interstate 476, known as the Blue Route, was squeezed into one lane after the latex asphalt sealant failed to harden overnight on the other two southbound lanes. That, in turn, clogged traffic entering the Blue Route from the Pennsylvania Turnpike, creating backups as long as 17 miles.
NEWS
October 2, 1999 | By Juan C. Rodriguez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Authorities evacuated about 700 students from Berlin Community School yesterday morning when fumes from paint sealant used on the roof made some children ill. Camden County officials said the fumes were reported more than an hour after they were first noticed in the school at 215 S. Franklin Ave. No one was seriously injured, but an emergency coordinator later criticized the school for waiting to call authorities. A teacher and students in an eighth-grade science classroom began complaining about the fumes about 9 a.m. Science teacher Barbara Rote and 37 students were taken to area hospitals, said George Hahn, the borough's emergency management coordinator.
NEWS
August 11, 1987 | By Francis M. Lordan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Construction work on the Benjamin Franklin Bridge will not be completed until at least Oct. 30, more than a year longer than the redecking project was initially scheduled to have taken, Delaware River Port Authority chairman William K. Dickey said yesterday. In the meantime, Dickey said, motorists will continue to face restricted traffic flows and delays on the partly closed span over the Delaware. The $72 million project has been slowed since March, when engineers first learned that an epoxy sealant being used to waterproof the joints of the bridge's new steel decking was defective.
NEWS
August 9, 2006 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A bad batch of blacktop on the Blue Route turned faces red at PennDot yesterday. Embarrassed officials apologized to drivers stuck in mammoth jams after a road sealant applied by overnight construction crews failed to harden in time for the morning rush hour. The goop forced southbound traffic on I-476, known as the Blue Route, to squeeze into one lane just south of the Schuylkill Expressway. Southbound traffic on the Pennsylvania Turnpike's Northeast Extension, in turn, backed up more than 10 miles to the Lansdale interchange.
NEWS
January 12, 2007 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three decades of the extremes of Philadelphia's winters and summers take their toll on a building - even one considered to be environmentally state-of-the-art when built. That's why construction workers have begun what will be a seven-month task of resealing the shiny, black glass panels that make up the distinctive exterior of Peco Energy Co.'s headquarters at 2301 Market St. Some passersby began to notice the work last week, especially after construction crews removed and began disposing of several large PVC-like pipe structures that decorated the plaza area around the building.
NEWS
July 16, 1987 | By Francis M. Lordan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The new deck joints are leaking on about a third of the Benjamin Franklin Bridge, and traffic delays are expected while an estimated $2 million worth of repairs are made this summer. James R. Kelly, president of the Delaware River Port Authority, said that sealant used to bond 1,100 steel panels that make up the deck or roadway were leaking when it rained or snowed. The panels average about 13 feet wide by 40 feet long. "The problem is the epoxy surface on the panels, which is porous and leaking water," Kelly said.
NEWS
July 10, 1993 | Daily News wire services
WASHINGTON PESSIMISTS, THAT WE ARE, POLL SAYS When Americans think about their country's future, they think dour thoughts - and they almost always have, says a pollster analyzing years of readings of the American mind-set. Everett C. Ladd, executive director of the Roper Center for Public Opinion Research at Storrs, Conn., also finds that discontent is rampant in the world's richest economies. People in Great Britain, France, Japan, Germany, Spain, Italy and Canada, in a variety of polls taken by his organization and others since last fall, have said that their homelands' economic situations were bad and getting worse, he said.
FOOD
February 13, 1991 | By Morris and James Carey, Special to the Daily News
Q. What's the best way to install double-glass French doors? We have been told by one person that sealing on the inside is the best way, and another person told us that sealing on the outside is the best way. Which is correct? - H.K. A. They're both good methods, but the best way is to do both. The two-step process is simple. A metal flashing should be installed across the top of the opening at the exterior, and foam or caulk sealant should be used to completely fill the gap between the frame of the door and the frame of the opening in the wall.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2010
HERE ARE some good ideas, for summer and beyond. Watering-can shower To avoid tracking in sand or soil after a day at the beach or working in the garden, set up a rinsing station just outside your door or at another convenient location. The steady stream from an ordinary watering can cleans every unwanted speck from your feet. Around the world Don't stash away or discard maps from your favorite vacation spots. Use them to make these handy coasters and you'll be reminded of that special destination every time you reach for one. Create a set for yourself and another for your travel companions.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 27, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the years, chemists have figured out how to make glues that stick to practically every material known to humans. Nowadays, that includes every material known to make up humans. One of the latest adhesives for use in the body, TissuGlu, aims to eliminate the need for fluid drains after reconstructive surgeries such as tummy tucks or mastectomies. The Pittsburgh developers already have gotten it approved in Europe. Another novel stickum may vastly improve surgeons' ability to repair congenital holes in newborns' hearts.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2010
HERE ARE some good ideas, for summer and beyond. Watering-can shower To avoid tracking in sand or soil after a day at the beach or working in the garden, set up a rinsing station just outside your door or at another convenient location. The steady stream from an ordinary watering can cleans every unwanted speck from your feet. Around the world Don't stash away or discard maps from your favorite vacation spots. Use them to make these handy coasters and you'll be reminded of that special destination every time you reach for one. Create a set for yourself and another for your travel companions.
NEWS
January 12, 2007 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three decades of the extremes of Philadelphia's winters and summers take their toll on a building - even one considered to be environmentally state-of-the-art when built. That's why construction workers have begun what will be a seven-month task of resealing the shiny, black glass panels that make up the distinctive exterior of Peco Energy Co.'s headquarters at 2301 Market St. Some passersby began to notice the work last week, especially after construction crews removed and began disposing of several large PVC-like pipe structures that decorated the plaza area around the building.
NEWS
August 17, 2006 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
PennDot officials, still puzzled by a defective road sealant that caused hours-long backups for morning commuters last week in Montgomery County, have switched to a more reliable but pricier alternative. On Aug. 8, southbound traffic on Interstate 476, known as the Blue Route, was squeezed into one lane after the latex asphalt sealant failed to harden overnight on the other two southbound lanes. That, in turn, clogged traffic entering the Blue Route from the Pennsylvania Turnpike, creating backups as long as 17 miles.
NEWS
August 9, 2006 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A bad batch of blacktop on the Blue Route turned faces red at PennDot yesterday. Embarrassed officials apologized to drivers stuck in mammoth jams after a road sealant applied by overnight construction crews failed to harden in time for the morning rush hour. The goop forced southbound traffic on I-476, known as the Blue Route, to squeeze into one lane just south of the Schuylkill Expressway. Southbound traffic on the Pennsylvania Turnpike's Northeast Extension, in turn, backed up more than 10 miles to the Lansdale interchange.
REAL_ESTATE
November 20, 2005 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Dean Johnson, host of the renovation TV program Hometime, crouched in the corner of a kitchen, showing John Channon how to install 12-by-12-inch ceramic tiles along blue chalk guidelines he carefully snapped along the fiber-cement underlayment known as Hardiboard. Before applying the adhesive, Johnson and Channon placed several tiles side by side on the floor along the chalk line, both to see how they would fit and to determine the spacing between them, so that the grout lines would be even.
NEWS
October 2, 1999 | By Juan C. Rodriguez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Authorities evacuated about 700 students from Berlin Community School yesterday morning when fumes from paint sealant used on the roof made some children ill. Camden County officials said the fumes were reported more than an hour after they were first noticed in the school at 215 S. Franklin Ave. No one was seriously injured, but an emergency coordinator later criticized the school for waiting to call authorities. A teacher and students in an eighth-grade science classroom began complaining about the fumes about 9 a.m. Science teacher Barbara Rote and 37 students were taken to area hospitals, said George Hahn, the borough's emergency management coordinator.
NEWS
July 10, 1993 | Daily News wire services
WASHINGTON PESSIMISTS, THAT WE ARE, POLL SAYS When Americans think about their country's future, they think dour thoughts - and they almost always have, says a pollster analyzing years of readings of the American mind-set. Everett C. Ladd, executive director of the Roper Center for Public Opinion Research at Storrs, Conn., also finds that discontent is rampant in the world's richest economies. People in Great Britain, France, Japan, Germany, Spain, Italy and Canada, in a variety of polls taken by his organization and others since last fall, have said that their homelands' economic situations were bad and getting worse, he said.
NEWS
June 4, 1992 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
For years, Dick Tobin kept looking for the tough stuff. He pounded surfaces with boards and a hammer. He soaked them in water. And finally, he and other city health officials decided they'd found it. They say they're ready to approve a cheaper and safer way to reduce lead paint hazards in some of Philadelphia's contaminated homes. Starting late this summer, city crews will begin spreading an epoxy-like coating over lead paint on many surfaces, instead of always removing the paint.
FOOD
February 13, 1991 | By Morris and James Carey, Special to the Daily News
Q. What's the best way to install double-glass French doors? We have been told by one person that sealing on the inside is the best way, and another person told us that sealing on the outside is the best way. Which is correct? - H.K. A. They're both good methods, but the best way is to do both. The two-step process is simple. A metal flashing should be installed across the top of the opening at the exterior, and foam or caulk sealant should be used to completely fill the gap between the frame of the door and the frame of the opening in the wall.
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