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Seattle Slew

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May 8, 2002 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seattle Slew, the homely, awkward commoner who became one of the greatest champions and stallions in the sport of kings, died at 28 yesterday, 25 years to the day after he won the Kentucky Derby. The 1977 Triple Crown winner, whose age in human years would have been at least 80, succumbed in his sleep at Hill 'n' Dale, the 319-acre Lexington, Ky., farm where he will be buried. A longtime resident of nearby Spendthrift and Three Chimneys Farms, Slew had been moved to Hill 'n' Dale recently after a second spinal operation.
SPORTS
December 14, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Prize money on the PGA Tour will go up to a record $180 million in 2001, with an even larger increase anticipated when the tour negotiates a new, four-year television contract in the spring. Also, commissioner Tim Finch-em said yesterday he's confident the tour can work out marketing issues with the player largely responsible for those rising purses - Tiger Woods. "We don't have issues that can't be resolved," Finchem said during a teleconference to discuss the state of the tour.
SPORTS
June 22, 1997 | By Craig Donnelly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leestown was on the "small side" and excelled at middle distances, so he was not considered a serious candidate for this year's Triple Crown by the powerful D. Wayne Lukas stable. But the son of Seattle Slew, the 1977 Triple Crown winner, is on the rise, as he displayed again yesterday at Delaware Park by capturing the $150,000 Leonard Richards Stakes. Leestown triumphed by one length over George Steinbrenner's fast-closing Universe. The pacesetting Bleu Madura finished 2 1/4 lengths back in third, with Gold Book fourth in the field of eight 3-year-olds.
SPORTS
September 23, 1994 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
Philadelphia Park's Cotillion Handicap once was a mandatory stop for 3- year-old fillies in the fall. Now, there are so many stakes races for 3- year-old fillies, especially in New York, that past winners, such as Shuvee, Alma North, Susan's Girl, My Juliet, Revidere and Truly Bound, champions and near champions, are just that - past. Tomorrow's race drew a nice field of 10, but no champions or potential champions. Realistically, only Lakeway and Heavenly Prize are candidates for the 3-year-old filly championship.
SPORTS
June 3, 1997 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
Compose a list of the 20 greatest horses in American racing history and there would be a place for Buckpasser, Cigar, Damascus, Dr. Fager, Easy Goer, Forego, John Henry, Kelso, Man o' War, Nashua, Native Dancer, Spectacular Bid and Sunday Silence. None won the Triple Crown. Some just weren't ready for that five-week crucible as 3-year-olds, and made their marks later. Seven tried and failed to win the three races at three race tracks at three different distances over those 35 days in May and June.
SPORTS
May 10, 1996 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
This time, there wasn't even a week's suspense. For the 18th consecutive year, there will be no Triple Crown winner. Kentucky Derby winner Grindstone, who won the most thrilling Derby in 35 years, has been retired to stud after a bone chip was discovered in the knee of his right front leg, the same injury that caused him to have an operation last year. The colt, a son of 1990 Derby winner Unbridled, made just the sixth start of his career last Saturday. Now, just that fast, he's gone.
SPORTS
May 14, 2013 | Associated Press
BALTIMORE - Orb has settled into the place reserved for royalty at Pimlico Race Course - Stall 40. The Triple Crown hopeful arrived at Pimlico on Monday afternoon, five days before the Preakness. He was immediately taken to Stall 40 at the Stakes Barn, which traditionally serves as home to the Kentucky Derby winner. Some of the greatest horses in history have been kept there, including the last three Triple Crown winners: Secretariat (1973), Seattle Slew (1977), and Affirmed (1978)
SPORTS
January 13, 2001 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
An angry Shaquille O'Neal asked the Los Angeles Lakers to trade him two weeks ago, but general manager Mitch Kupchak didn't take the request seriously and said problems within the team will soon blow over. "I have no knowledge of that. I read it for the first time today," said O'Neal's agent, Leonard Armato, referring to a Los Angeles Times report that O'Neal told Kupchak and coach Phil Jackson in separate conversations after a game in Phoenix on Dec. 28 that he wanted to be traded.
SPORTS
August 8, 2004 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Smarty Jones will have a room with a view: Seattle Slew's old digs at Three Chimneys Farm, the only stall in the stallion barn where you can see all the mares parade from the receiving barn to the breeding shed. He'll like it here. The 1,700-acre Three Chimneys, just outside Lexington, is what you'd expect from a Kentucky farm that calls itself a "boutique" breeding operation. It's all stone, brick and charm, with rolling green hills in all directions, an old tobacco barn converted into a place for mares, individual 2 1/2-acre paddocks for each stallion, and spacious wood-paneled stalls.
SPORTS
October 16, 2007 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Nebraska athletic director Steve Pederson was fired yesterday, two days after the school's once-mighty football team was rocked with its worst home loss in nearly a half-century. Pederson, along with coach Bill Callahan, has been heavily criticized after a series of one-sided losses this season. The most recent was a 45-14 loss to Oklahoma State on Saturday with former Cornhuskers coach Tom Osborne and his 1997 national title team in attendance. Callahan's job is apparently safe for now. Chancellor Harvey Perlman said the next athletic director would decide the fate of the football staff.
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SPORTS
May 14, 2013 | Associated Press
BALTIMORE - Orb has settled into the place reserved for royalty at Pimlico Race Course - Stall 40. The Triple Crown hopeful arrived at Pimlico on Monday afternoon, five days before the Preakness. He was immediately taken to Stall 40 at the Stakes Barn, which traditionally serves as home to the Kentucky Derby winner. Some of the greatest horses in history have been kept there, including the last three Triple Crown winners: Secretariat (1973), Seattle Slew (1977), and Affirmed (1978)
SPORTS
October 16, 2007 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Nebraska athletic director Steve Pederson was fired yesterday, two days after the school's once-mighty football team was rocked with its worst home loss in nearly a half-century. Pederson, along with coach Bill Callahan, has been heavily criticized after a series of one-sided losses this season. The most recent was a 45-14 loss to Oklahoma State on Saturday with former Cornhuskers coach Tom Osborne and his 1997 national title team in attendance. Callahan's job is apparently safe for now. Chancellor Harvey Perlman said the next athletic director would decide the fate of the football staff.
SPORTS
August 8, 2004 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Smarty Jones will have a room with a view: Seattle Slew's old digs at Three Chimneys Farm, the only stall in the stallion barn where you can see all the mares parade from the receiving barn to the breeding shed. He'll like it here. The 1,700-acre Three Chimneys, just outside Lexington, is what you'd expect from a Kentucky farm that calls itself a "boutique" breeding operation. It's all stone, brick and charm, with rolling green hills in all directions, an old tobacco barn converted into a place for mares, individual 2 1/2-acre paddocks for each stallion, and spacious wood-paneled stalls.
SPORTS
May 7, 2004 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Now that his Kentucky Derby victory has catapulted Smarty Jones into national prominence, Philly's favorite four-legged competitor suddenly is being compared to another Derby winner of humble origins and great popular appeal. Until Saturday, Seattle Slew had been the last horse to emerge unbeaten from the Run for the Roses. So while comparisons to the 1977 Triple Crown winner may be inevitable, they also are amazingly apt. Like Smarty Jones, Seattle Slew lacked the majestic physical bearing of a Secretariat or a Spectacular Bid, was the lightly regarded product of parents that no one then deemed exceptional, possessed breeding that indicated he ought to be a sprinter, and was 6-0 when he managed to navigate early traffic and triumph in the Derby.
SPORTS
May 8, 2002 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seattle Slew, the homely, awkward commoner who became one of the greatest champions and stallions in the sport of kings, died at 28 yesterday, 25 years to the day after he won the Kentucky Derby. The 1977 Triple Crown winner, whose age in human years would have been at least 80, succumbed in his sleep at Hill 'n' Dale, the 319-acre Lexington, Ky., farm where he will be buried. A longtime resident of nearby Spendthrift and Three Chimneys Farms, Slew had been moved to Hill 'n' Dale recently after a second spinal operation.
SPORTS
January 13, 2001 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
An angry Shaquille O'Neal asked the Los Angeles Lakers to trade him two weeks ago, but general manager Mitch Kupchak didn't take the request seriously and said problems within the team will soon blow over. "I have no knowledge of that. I read it for the first time today," said O'Neal's agent, Leonard Armato, referring to a Los Angeles Times report that O'Neal told Kupchak and coach Phil Jackson in separate conversations after a game in Phoenix on Dec. 28 that he wanted to be traded.
SPORTS
December 14, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Prize money on the PGA Tour will go up to a record $180 million in 2001, with an even larger increase anticipated when the tour negotiates a new, four-year television contract in the spring. Also, commissioner Tim Finch-em said yesterday he's confident the tour can work out marketing issues with the player largely responsible for those rising purses - Tiger Woods. "We don't have issues that can't be resolved," Finchem said during a teleconference to discuss the state of the tour.
SPORTS
June 6, 1998 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
It's been a three-week wait for 2 1/2 minutes. When the horses are sent on their way from the starting gate in today's Belmont Stakes, one horse will negotiate the mile and a half at Belmont Park in that 150-second window faster than the rest. If it's any horse but Real Quiet, it's just another Belmont Stakes winner. If it's Real Quiet, it's a Triple Crown and a $5 million bonus for owner Mike Pegram. "I'm a horse fan that ended up owning horses," Pegram said the other day. What better owner to win the first Triple Crown in 20 years.
SPORTS
May 31, 1998 | By Christopher K. Hepp, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Real Quiet approaches the Belmont Stakes with a chance to become only the 12th horse to win the Triple Crown, it is tempting to dwell on the great heritage and tradition of thoroughbred racing, the power and glory of past winners, the role call of champions. Let's resist that urge for a moment. Let's discuss a more mundane and earthy matter. Let's talk stud fees. What might a Triple Crown winner be worth in the sack? In short, a lot. Peter Kirwan, general manager of Highland Farms Inc., says for a mare to get a roll in the hay with Real Quiet, it would cost a mare's owner $50,000 or $60,000 now. And that number could go higher should he win the Triple Crown.
SPORTS
June 22, 1997 | By Craig Donnelly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leestown was on the "small side" and excelled at middle distances, so he was not considered a serious candidate for this year's Triple Crown by the powerful D. Wayne Lukas stable. But the son of Seattle Slew, the 1977 Triple Crown winner, is on the rise, as he displayed again yesterday at Delaware Park by capturing the $150,000 Leonard Richards Stakes. Leestown triumphed by one length over George Steinbrenner's fast-closing Universe. The pacesetting Bleu Madura finished 2 1/4 lengths back in third, with Gold Book fourth in the field of eight 3-year-olds.
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