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Secession

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NEWS
February 28, 1987 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Delaware County judge has dismissed for a second time a petition by black residents of southern Darby Township to secede from the racially segregated community. Common Pleas Court Judge Howard F. Reed Jr. dismissed on procedural grounds a petition by the Concerned Citizens of Darby Township, a group of residents representing the community's predominantly black section, to secede from the white-dominated township and create a borough called Green Hill. The order for dismissal, issued Tuesday, was received yesterday by the attorney for secession proponents.
NEWS
November 23, 1986 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposal to endorse southern Darby's move to secede from Darby township was voted down by the Board of Commissioners last week during a raucous meeting in which black residents accused the board's white majority of ignoring their needs and concerns. Commissioner Lee Taliaferro offered the proposal Wednesday to endorse secession, saying that it would stand a better chance in court if it had the township's backing. Proponents of the bid for secession must collect signatures supporting the move from a majority of homeowners in southern Darby Township before it will be considered by the county court.
NEWS
July 9, 1987 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
A group of Darby Township residents told mediators they oppose a secession movement because they fear creating a separate borough in the township's southern end could result in higher taxes and isolation. "Economics is the bottom line," Samuel Alexander told residents and representatives of the Friends Mediation Service of Philadelphia last week. "The vast majority of homeowners do not want secession. They realize what it would cost," said Alexander, the township's building inspector.
NEWS
May 7, 1988 | By RON GOLDWYN and JOANNE SILLS, Daily News Staff Writers Staff Writer Gina Boubion contriubuted to this report
Imagine the City of Philadelphia without Chestnut Hill: Nobody wearing plaid pants. Hardly anyone left to eat all that brie cheese. Ex-Mayors Rizzo and Green in exile - or forced to move off the Hill if they want to run for their old jobs again. Some community leaders in Chestnut Hill think that seceding from Philadelphia sounds grand. Willard S. Detweiler, president of the Chestnut Hill Community Association, believes the Hill should consider incorporating itself, apart from the rest of the city.
NEWS
June 10, 2011
Saturday's editorial, "Taxing seniors," called attention to the issues facing seniors living in continuing-care retirement communities and age-restricted communities. Taxing all property owners to fund schools is settled law. But municipal taxation for self-contained communities is not. I live in a 55+ community that provides all its own services, including water, sewer (we have our own sewage plant), snow plowing, road repair, trash pickup, and recycling. Yet we are taxed by the township as if we received full township services.
NEWS
September 23, 2002 | By Dick Polman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They liken themselves to the colonial rebels of 1776, even though they have no plans to march southward in their khaki shorts over the Santa Monica Mountains and hurl their lattes at the downtown sophisticates. But their mode of rebellion is still revolutionary. They are trying to stage the biggest municipal divorce in American history - severing their sprawling suburbia, the San Fernando Valley, from the rest of Los Angeles situated "over the hill" - and create the sixth most populous city in the nation, right behind Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 16, 1994 | By Cathleen Egan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Turnout is expected to be higher than usual Tuesday when voters decide whether Winslow Township should break away from the Lower Camden County Regional High School District. The issue has been hotly debated in recent weeks not only in Winslow, but in the district's other communities. "In a normal school election, we get about 10 percent" of the 35,651 registered voters, said June Dzierzynski, the regional district's business administrator. "We're expecting much more than that.
NEWS
November 23, 1998 | By Angela Pomponio, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Members of the West Norriton Education Reform Movement say they are serious about wanting out of the Norristown Area School District - so much so that they are prepared to knock on doors in hopes of gathering the signatures of 9,000 residents to back their secession plan. The group announced last month that it wanted to break away from Norristown and move students from Burnside and Marshall Street Elementary Schools to the Methacton School District. Prompting the secession drive, members of the group said, was the Norristown school board's failure to decide last month whether to close or rehabilitate Burnside Elementary School in West Norriton.
NEWS
February 19, 1997 | By Douglas Belkin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Montgomery County Court judge yesterday heard arguments for and against a petition filed by some Montgomery Township residents seeking to secede from the North Penn School District and join the Hatboro-Horsham School District. Testimony is expected to continue today, with a ruling expected immediately. If the petition presented by The Educational Alternative for Montgomery (TEAM) Inc. is approved, it will be forwarded to the state secretary of education, who will determine whether the secession should proceed.
NEWS
March 2, 1996 | By Joseph Sobran
Now that his birthday is behind us, is it possible to say a few critical words about Abraham Lincoln without sounding sacrilegious? No question, Lincoln was a formidable man who had the force of character to preside at the great crisis of our history. He wrote with an eloquence that puts him in the company of Shakespeare and Milton; he shaped the way we still think, not only about the Civil War, but about our national identity itself. But I must confess that my admiration for Lincoln is not as unqualified as it used to be. Far from it. Though he was right about slavery, he himself acknowledged that slavery was not the central issue of the Civil War. The central issue was the preservation of the Union, and he said forthrightly that he would tolerate or abolish slavery, depending on which course would achieve his "paramount" goal of saving the Union from secession.
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NEWS
November 23, 2012
By Jonathan Gurwitz Sore losers threatening to leave the United States. Extremists trafficking in loose talk about secession. A description of the aftermath of the 2012 election? Yes, but also of the situation in 2004. The liberal establishment has been exasperated to discover that some Americans who are dismayed at the prospect of living four more years under an administration they detest could consider secession. In response to petitions that appeared on the White House website from citizens in all 50 states asserting the right of states to secede, Obama supporters started their own petition to "strip the citizenship of everyone who signed a petition to secede and exile them.
NEWS
November 19, 2012
By Frank Cerabino WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - Thousands of Floridians have gotten the idea that seceding from the United States is the proper reaction to the presidential election. This is good news for me - especially if these foes of tyranny put their rugged individualism into actual action by not using Interstate 95. My commute will be much easier when I don't have to share the federal highway with freeloading secessionists. Since President Obama was reelected - an outrageous perversion of democracy in which the person with the most votes was declared the winner - online secession petitions have popped up in more than 20 states.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
About 700,000 people, from all 50 states, have signed petitions on a White House web site seeking permission from the Obama administration for their states to secede from the country and create new governments. The total number on two Pennsylvania petitions rose by Wednesday afternoon to 17,884, while another 12,330 signed a single New Jersey petition and 6,591 others signed one for Delaware. Petitions in at least seven states have collected in excess of 25,000 signatures, requiring the Obama Administration to formally respond by reviewing the requests.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The petitions on the White House website won't be granted. They're the aftereffects of a heated presidential election season, folks simply blowing off steam, historians and scholars say. Hundreds of thousands of Americans unhappy with the result of last week's voting have signed petitions on behalf of at least 35 states, including Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. What do they want? For the Obama administration to "peacefully grant" the states permission to "withdraw from the United States of America" and create new governments.
NEWS
July 6, 2012 | Letter to the Inquirer Editor
Failing grade on Civil War David Goldfield deserves a failing grade ("A deadly rush into Civil War," Monday). Southern slave owners took their states out of the Union because they wanted no restrictions on the expansion of slavery. They feared any political evolution that would make a peaceful end to slavery possible. In 1860, Lincoln and the Republican platform recognized the constitutionality of slavery in the states where it already existed, but opposed the creation of any new slave states.
NEWS
June 10, 2011
Saturday's editorial, "Taxing seniors," called attention to the issues facing seniors living in continuing-care retirement communities and age-restricted communities. Taxing all property owners to fund schools is settled law. But municipal taxation for self-contained communities is not. I live in a 55+ community that provides all its own services, including water, sewer (we have our own sewage plant), snow plowing, road repair, trash pickup, and recycling. Yet we are taxed by the township as if we received full township services.
NEWS
February 10, 2011 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Momentous days are at hand for Sudan, and actress Mia Farrow, who travels constantly throughout Africa, and has worked hard for the people of Darfur, says she is feeling both hope and trepidation. Farrow, 66, will receive this year's Marian Anderson Award, given to celebrities who work for social change. The award ceremony is May 10 at the Kimmel Center. "Yes, the people of the south voted to secede," Farrow says, speaking from her home in Connecticut. She's referring to the referendum in which nearly 99 percent of voters in Southern Sudan voted for independence.
NEWS
November 6, 2006 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Separatists, unite! That was the pitch this weekend by neo-Confederates, New England free-staters, Hawaiian nationalists, and a clutch of other dissenters who want out of the United States. The First North American Secessionist Convention, billed as the first national gathering of secessionists since the Civil War, included an eclectic mix of conservatives, liberals, libertarians, left-wing Green Party zealots, and right-wing Christian activists. The bearded, denim-vested representative of the Alaskan Independence Party sat next to the United Texas Republic man in his gray suit and red tie, just across from the blond pony-tailed representative of Cascadia (better known as Oregon, Washington and British Columbia)
NEWS
August 16, 2004 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 150 houses look like most of the sherbet-hued vacation homes in neighboring Avalon. The view of the Intracoastal Waterway from the marina is about the same as the one from Avalon. Even the name screams Avalon. But Avalon Manor isn't Avalon. The two-square-mile bay island is part of 72-square-mile, betwixt-and-between Middle Township, a mainland Cape May County municipality. And most of the 290 residents on this pocket of land at the foot of a bridge leading to the Avalon barrier island would like that to change.
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